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How Has The Short Supply Of Data Analysts Impacted The Industry?

How Has The Short Supply of Data Analysts Impacted The Industry?

Is Data the world’s most valuable asset? Every business has it, most use it, and the best transform their businesses with it. It’s unsurprising, then, that there is now an enormous demand for Data Scientists, Data Engineers, and all forms of Analysts. Whilst many enterprises are now beginning to see the benefit of internal Data education, progress in upskilling remains slow. But how is this impacting the industry?  Education, Education, Education For starters, with the evolution of Data, we have also seen an evolution in education. Universities have long been our source for acquiring knowledge, skills, values and beliefs. As such, they continuously reinvent the way they educate, modernising and adapting to the present day. So, it will come as no surprise that we are seeing more and more Data focused programmes and degrees in top universities around the world, including in the Nordics.  This is a great way of organically growing Data talent and supplying businesses with freshly educated minds, and should, in the long term, help conquer the short supply of talent available. As there is little to no sign that Data will become irrelevant anytime soon, providing an education in this area makes sense. And, with so many training and educational opportunities now available, businesses looking to upskill their employees have the option to externally fund their development. A Fountain of Youth Another highly visible effect of this talent shortage, and something unique to the Data & Analytics industry, is a lack of experienced leaders. Whilst there definitely are great leaders within this space, all with plenty of knowledge, the young make-up of the market means that their experience is often limited. Having reported on the state of the industry in our Diversity Report, Harnham found that over 60% of the Data & Analytics community is aged between 25 and 34, with 35% aged between 35 and 44. In other words, those leading the industry are young, or at least younger than in many more established industries. There are some obvious reasons for this, as Data is a relatively new field, and its importance to businesses has only emerged somewhat recently. Of course, having young leadership does not imply ignorance or inadequacy, but simply highlights how young the industry is, and how those leading may still have plenty of room to develop.  Fast-Paced Progression Going hand-in hand with young management is, unsurprisingly, an industry that offers fast progression. From the moment you step out into the wild world of Data & Analytics, there are numerous opportunities to progress quickly into specialist and management roles. However, this has stabilised somewhat recently.  Our 2019 Salary Guide uncovered that it now typically takes 10 to 12 years to reach a Director/Head of position. Obviously these numbers are an average, with those in Digital Analytics progressing significantly faster than those in Risk Analytics, alongside natural variations depending on the sector and size of individual businesses.  What remains apparent is, with such a high demand for talent that’s in short supply, it is crucial that businesses can both recruit and retain the best individuals out there. By keeping the above in mind, and ensuring that education, progression and leadership opportunities are on each employee’s career path, enterprises stand a better chance of getting hold of, and keeping, the best people in the industry.  If you’re looking to get hold of the best employees in a talent-short market, or are looking to take the next step in your career, Harnham can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

A decade of data

A Decade of Data

Y2K was nearly 20 years ago. Remember when we were all worried about the massive changes that could mean; the preparations we made getting ready for the turn of the century? Ten years later, we scoffed at our worries and hopped on the Data bandwagon…some of us. Others are still trying to catch up but in recent years, most businesses have realised it isn’t a matter of “if” you should have a Data strategy and begin to build your team, it’s a matter of “if you don’t do it, you’ll be left behind.” As the year and the decade come to a close, we thought we’d take a look back and see some of the trends which have shaped a decade of digital transformation. And like everyone who takes a moment to look back and reflect, in our next article, we’ll take a look forward and see what surprises 2020 has in store. Data Trends Then and Now Still reeling from the financial crisis of 2008-2009, budget concerns were top of mind for many. The takeaway? Plan, and be flexible.  Other trends which began in 2010 still exist today, but the vocabulary has changed. And there are further changes still which impact our technologies today and in ways we may not have realized. Train and Retrain becomes Upskill and Reskill. In 2010, organisations were advised to train, and cross train their staff. Not much has changed in ten years as it’s just as important now. Only the vocabulary has changed. Now it’s upskill and reskill those employees with the skill and inclination to pivot into more Data-centric roles within your company.Colocation Concerns Give Rise to the Cloud. Astronomical real estate costs for Data centre space and colocation prices drove businesses to find another way to store and manage their Data. As Cloud Computing spread, it allowed companies to avoid costly IT infrastructures. Not only did this save money, but it also gave businesses the flexibility they needed. In addition to the benefits of enterprise level organisations, cloud computing levels the playing field for smaller businesses to get in on the game.Virtual in the Palm of Your Hand. Smartphones and apps offer project management of our businesses and personal lives from “what’s for dinner?” to “let’s schedule our next meeting.” Our smartphones are a one-stop shop for phone calls, text messages, video conferences, scheduling, communication with remote teams, online banking, bill pay, and more.Eco-friendly is not an option, it’s an imperative. Carbon-emissions and reduction plans were already abuzz within companies. Today, Data has evolved from LEED green building certification to massive advances and predictions on the climate crisis. Standards are set.Blockchain finds friends in finance, and beyond. Though it debuted in 2008 in the finance industry, it was quickly snapped up in every industry from manufacturing to retail to shipping; any business requiring a more organised supply chain.  Rise of Automation and Artificial Intelligence (AI) offers benefits beyond basic tasks. While this evokes fears for many in the workforce, there are benefits which is what’s driving things forward. While this is intended to streamline processes and avoid health risks in dangerous places like factories, there is still some cause for concern. However, some studies suggest people are happy to allow computers to take on mundane, routine, and menial tasks, freeing humans to think more creatively.  Getting Social Goes Online. Though platforms like Facebook and MySpace (yeah, remember MySpace?) were already available in 2010, the plethora of platforms today was a glimmer in our smartphones’ eye. No longer relegated to youth culture, social media has become one of the most important ways for leaders and corporations to communicate with people.  The Information Age has morphed into the 'Data Decade', with improvements across Data and Analytics, AI, and Machine Learning just to name a few. It’s enhancements within these spectrums which allow Data professionals to search and sort more quickly to provide the most useful Insights for their enterprises.   It’s estimated that in the next couple of years, 90% of companies will list information as critical and Analytics as essential to their business strategy. If you’re interested in Marketing & Insights, Robots and Automation, Big Data and Digital or Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

‘Tis The Season Of Data: Black Friday Is Here

‘Tis The Season Of Data: Black Friday Is Here

It’s that time of year again. Decorations are going up, the temperature is dropping daily, and the year’s biggest shopping weekend is upon us.  Black Friday and Cyber Monday may have started stateside, but they’re now a global phenomenon. This year, in the UK alone, shoppers are expended to spend £8.57 billion over the four-day weekend. But, for retailers, this mega-event means more than a cash injection. In the world of Data, insights gained from shopping and spending habits during this period can dictate their product and pricing strategies for the next twelve months.  So what is it, exactly, that we can stand to learn from the Black Friday weekend? THE GHOST OF BLACK FRIDAY PAST There are a few interesting takeaways from 2018’s Black Friday weekend that will likely impact what we see this year.  Firstly, and perhaps unsurprisingly given that it’s a few years since the event has become omnipresent, spending only increased about half as much as initially predicted. There are a number of reasons for this, but cynicism plays a central role. More and more, consumers are viewing Black Friday deals with an element of suspicion and questioning whether the discounts are as good as they’re promoted to be. This, combined with other major annual retail events, such as Amazon’s Prime Day, means that this weekend no longer has the clout it once did.  However, 2018 also saw marketers doing more to stand out against the competition. Many businesses have moved away from traditional in-your-face sales messaging and some are even limiting their Black Friday deals to subscribers and members. By taking this approach, their sales stand out from the mass market and can help maintain a level of exclusivity that could be jeopardised by excessive discounts. In addition to branding, marketers making the most of retargeting saw an even greater uplift in sale. Particularly when it came to the use of apps, those in the UK using retargeting saw a 50% larger revenue uplift than those who didn’t.  So, having reviewed last year’s Data; what should businesses be doing this year in order to stand out? GETTING BLACK FRIDAY-READY WITH DATA Businesses preparing for Black Friday need to take into account a number of considerations involving both Marketing and Pricing. For the latter, Data and Predictive Analytics play a huge role in determining what items should go on sale, and what their price should be.  Far from just being based on gut instinct or word-of-mouth, algorithms derived from Advanced Analytics inform Machine Learning models that determine what should be on sale, and for how much. These take into account not only how many of each discounted product need to be sold to produce the right ROI, but also what prices and sales should be for the rest of the year in order to make the sale financially viable.  In terms of Marketing, Deep Learning techniques can be used to accurately predict Customer Behaviour and purchases. These predictions can then reveal which customers are likely to spend the most over the weekend, and which are likely to make minimal purchases. Marketers can then, in the lead up to Black Friday, target relevant messaging to each audience whether it be “get all you Christmas shopping in our sale” or “treat yourself to a one-off item”. By carefully analysing the Data they have available and reviewing the successes and failures of their Black Friday events, businesses can generate greater customer loyalty and improve their sales year-round. If you’re looking to build out your Marketing Analytics team or take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

MARKETING INSIGHT AND THE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK LOOP

Marketing Insight And The Customer Feedback Loop

As the holidays approach, Marketers are focusing more than ever on User Experience (UX). They’re not only looking at what kind of product customers might want or need but how will it look and feel to them? If a product doesn’t have what you need or doesn’t function as appealingly as others, what good is it? Key elements such as aesthetics, usability, and ‘feel’ are integral to the user experience. Because these elements come from such seemingly disparate departments as Marketing and Developers, it’s important to figure out how to come together for the ultimate UX. After all, if today’s buyers buy experiences over tangible products, then ensuring the experience is important to bridging the gap between customers, marketers, and developers. This, when done right, helps to build and retain customer relationships; the foundations upon which business is built. Design User Experience with M&D By bringing marketers and developers (M&D) together, you create the opportunity for innovation. But there are some key elements to consider when designing UX and it follows four stages. Do your research. Identify needs, spending patterns, buying behaviours, and historical data to determine what it is customers desire. Find out what they want or need and give it to them. This is the role of the marketer backed by development.Gather the data. Using multiple touch points across multiple sources and channels, find what works. What product offers usability and determine how design choices can help to create a seamless experience for your customer.Design your idea and create a prototype. Brainstorm your design. What are its product features, user interface, and aesthetics? Does it look user friendly? Would you pick it up off the shelf? Why? What is it about the product that makes you want to have it? What problems can it solve for you?Time to Test it. Is your product user friendly? What are its useful functions? How does it look? Feel? Incorporate feedback to improve its performance, function, or aesthetic. What does your test market say? Would they buy it? Why or why not? Bridging the Gap with collaboration We can forget sometimes, lost in our jargon and our buzzwords, that it’s the customer who we hope will benefit from our product or service. Yet, traditionally, marketers gathered customer preferences and drove sales, while developers designed products based on those preferences. However, the two departments were often siloed and creativity, usability, function, and aesthetics either got overshadowed or underrepresented to varying degrees. Enter customer feedback an integral point of reference for all parties involved. Customers are at the heart of user experience and it’s their feedback which can inform the user experience. What better marketing insights than those straight from the customer? Working with Marketers and Developers, customers provide a crucial component to helping marketers understand market dynamics. On the flip side, customer feedback can help mitigate risk or issues down the road by providing solutions and helping to resolve problems. the impact on Product Development By conducting user experience testing, marketers and developers can determine if a product is a good fit for customer needs. At the same time, they may identify issues to be resolved which can be learned of in real-time for a better user experience once the product is launched. Each has their role to play in designing the user experience and contributing to market insights for more informed business decisions.  These include: Marketers are part of the design experience from conception to inception. They are responsible for gathering the data to identify problem areas, working with Developers to create a product or service to solve a problem, and gathering data from the customer. Do they like this product? Why? What pain points does it serve? And how can it be made better or improved? Developers are the designers. They must take the information the marketers have collected and try to make the product into something functional and aesthetically-pleasing. Though they operate more at the back-end, they too much collaborate with customers to capture issues and solve problems. Developers test the products, making improvements as needed. Each stage a constant in UX design.Customers offer invaluable data and metrics through their feedback and reviews. The insights they contain as the end user about using the product, revealing its challenges, and suggesting room for improvement, make this three-part collaboration the final link in the chain between marketers, developers, and customers when it comes to designing the ultimate user experience. If you’re interested in the relationship between insights and UX, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more. 

Integrate Your Data And Business Strategies For Success

Why You Need To Integrate Your Data and Business Strategies

United we stand, together we fall. Not too put too fine a point to it, but how your business and data strategies align are integral to your business. Today’s world is about change, being able to pivot toward new strategies, and being open to trying new things. Consider this: the “mom-and-pop” shop is back and it is flourishing. Younger generations of farmers are returning to their family farms when they graduate and they’re bringing new knowledge with them. And the makerspace, freelance, and gig economies are thriving. These businesses are learning how to work with technology and align their Data Strategy with their Business strategy. Some legacy enterprises are taking notice. Others are missing the mark. Consumers may have changed how they want to shop and learn about services and products, but the services they want and expect haven’t changed that much which is why it’s more important than ever to “know your customer.”  3 Key Elements of Integrated Strategies While there are a number of things to take into consideration as you align your strategies, these three key elements can help get you started. 1. Understand the key elements of Business Strategy. 2. Apply innovation strategy to business objectives. 3. Determine key elements of your Data Strategy for use in a real-world scenario. Understand the key elements of business strategy  A business strategy encapsulates two main ideas; cost advantage versus competition. The cost advantage includes costs and other resources, identification and awareness of strengths, weaknesses, and competition. Competitive advantage happens when you’ve done your market research and can show what makes you different from any other provider with similar goods and services. This is the time you might perform a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunity, and threat) analysis of your business. It’s helpful to include your mission and vision statements, objectives, core values, risk tolerance, and understanding trends in your business. Apply Innovation Strategy to Business Objectives Ideas and innovation flow when you and your business understand your customers and are able to easily shift into new things. Think R&D into Bioinformatics, automated tasks into AI, or a platform such as streaming services to help sell services such as insurance. Laying the groundwork to apply innovation strategies to your business objectives follow these ideas: Identify your business objectives by asking questions.Assess the budget and personnel resources and develop a budget strategy.Test the market to determine what issues will or need to be solved and understand how this innovation will benefit your overall strategy. If you’re working on a Data initiative to integrate into your Business strategy, one of the key elements is to determine how those changes may affect your business. Determine Key Elements of Data Strategy for Use in Real-World Scenarios As you work on developing your Data Strategy, it’s important to consider all the elements required to ensure success. So, what do you need to take into consideration when working on this type of strategy? Here are some things to consider as you develop your framework. Determine your business needs and their current state.Determine what works and what can be improved upon if there is a technology improvement or process.Evaluate your Data from sales, profit, and evaluate your progress.}Develop an action plan. Many businesses don’t incorporate just one type of Data into their strategy. They consider the potential impact of technologies such as Machine Learning, Predictive and Data Analytics, and other Big Data Strategies to drive improvements when it comes to decision making. They understand these Data-driven insights can help them improve or solve their most critical problems. There is a caveat, however, and it is how you collect the information for real-world scenarios. Certain requirements are in place for a reason and they ensure only relevant Data is collected. This is done by formulating “predictive models” and necessary information to operate and determine whether your case will be something to be done over time or if it’s something brand new to consider when looking at real-time access. One Final Thought… Data-centric organisations have a distinct advantage over their competition. The information gained from collecting and analysing to understanding their customers can offer great insight as to what’s working and what isn’t. Integrating your Business Strategy with a Data Strategy can offer you a more well-rounded understanding of the customers you serve and can ultimately, help you to serve them better; now and in the future. Disruptive business models from this way of thinking can also foster growth and lead to innovative changes in your marketplace. If you want to be at the forefront of change we may have a role or candidate for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.

Data Storytelling Vs Data Visualisation

Data Storytelling vs Data Visualisation

The demand for “unicorn” employees is growing. Those with humanities and communications skillsets are now in demand, alongside those who specialise in Computer Science, Data Science, and anything technology-related. So, what exactly is the world looking for today? Well, with the plethora of online learning opportunities available, the ramping up of technology courses both online and offline, and a cadre of storytelling books on the shelves; answering the question can seem daunting. But there are two ways in which you tell your story. They’re not separate exactly, but they do have their own parts to play. What is Data Storytelling? In a nutshell, it’s the ability to tell a story using the Data you’ve collected and analysed. So, how does this work exactly, and why would someone use it? This way to explain what’s happening the Data to stakeholders and executives helps paint a picture of their company in a different way. And unlike traditional storytelling, this type has facts and figures to back it up. But that’s only half the story. By taking a wider view of Data storytelling, you can provide stakeholders with the big picture in a way that’s relevant and engaging. But you still need the Data to back it up. This is where Data Visualisation comes in. Think of it as the Graphic Novel of your business’s story. Content is the narrative and images are the visual behind the narrative cementing the story in your mind. What is Data Visualisation? This is how you define your story, and you can do this in a variety of ways. You can use Data Visualisation software to help guide your story and keep you on track in the details. Seeing is believing and can help persuade a call-to-action from decision makers. In a nutshell, Data Visualisation enhances storytelling using traditional techniques such as a “hook”, and embodies the basic structure of beginning, middle, and end. And while those in the marketing world know how to draw emotion and get people to act on it, Data Storytelling provides a new, useful skill for Analysts. What are the Elements of a Good Story? First, understand the story you’re telling. While visualising the results happens at the end to cement the story you’re telling, the heavy lifting is done in Data preparation. It’s not unlike baking a cake; you spend more time buying (collecting/gathering) the ingredients, mixing them, and organising (which pan, how long, and at what temperature), than you do baking the cake. The end result is the smell of something freshly baked, that looks amazing (visualisation), and tastes phenomenal – where the story and the visuals come together. Second, identify the main characters; your Data elements. You need ask yourself what is the relationship between your characters (Data elements) and was is their role in the story. This can help you bring together two disparate Datasets. Ask yourself, what tools would you need to make things work together? This is the preparation side of things. Once this is sorted, you have the elements of your story.  Keys to Good Data Storytelling Choose the right subject Source credible DataCraft an interesting, engaging, or enlightening narrativeEnsure your story provides meaning and valueEnsure you’re using credible Data to back up your story.Blend narrative and visuals which can cement the information and make your story stick.Choose relevant, useful topics for a more engaging story. You want your listeners to resonate with what they’re hearing or seeing. When people are engaged, this is where the emotion comes in. Stories come from a variety of sources, but are essentially either internal (you or your organisation) or external (trade publications or industry leaders). For content marketing, external sources offer a variety of ideas to tailor your story around. But what best will resonate with your audience is your internal story. Those tailored to pain points or interests are particularly valuable.  Remember that Data storytelling is not a story about numbers; it’s about humans and how those numbers affect them.  If you’re interested in Data Storytelling and Visualisation, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current vacancies or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

Data & Berlin: Looking To 2020

Data & Berlin: Looking to 2020

Following our recent Data & Analytics meet-up at our new Berlin offices, I’ve been reflecting on some recurring challenges faced in our industry. A number of our speakers all touched on the same topics and, having looked around, it seems they aren’t the only ones who are concerned about staying ahead of the curve.  In a market of constantly shifting priorities and 2020 just around the corner, I’ve highlighted some of the main themes that keep coming up, and are worth bearing in mind as you begin to look at your Data & hiring strategies for next year: Retention Retention remains a highly important issue for businesses, as covered here, and we heard a number of insightful talks on the topic at our event. In particular, both the optimisation of workloads and the essence of customer centricity and autonomous teams were highlighted as key issues. Both providing interesting approaches to ensuring your workforce remains engaged and happy and  we will be releasing further information on these talks soon so, if you missed the event, watch this space or sign up to our mailing list to keep up to date. Cyber Security Following a number of high-profile data leaks (including the sensitive data belonging to hundreds of German politicians, celebrities and public figures less than one year ago), security really is at the forefront of everyone’s minds. Integrating Security into the DevOps cycle is becoming more and more popular as businesses increase their security and reliability alongside their speed of deployment. If you're interested in knowing more, the Puppet “State of DevOps Report 2019,” is well worth a read. Analysing Data How we analyse and use Data as a business is becoming more and more important as enterprises look to stay at the forefront of their fields and remain relevant in this Data-centric world. With so many different technologies and techniques used to quickly process & analyse data, Data Science, Machine Learning & Business Intelligence professionals are becoming more and more sought after. Recruiting & onboarding The recruitment and retention of staff is frequently the most important thing on the agenda of many businesses, not just in Data. Making sure your recruitment process in a candidate-led market is as streamlined and relevant as possible is something that should be a priority for any expanding business. From my experience, many companies write up their process, then stick with it for years and, whilst this can create consistency, in such a fast-paced and evolving industry is this necessarily the right thing to do? Here's one of my colleagues on attracting the right candidates and I also intend to put together my own article on creating an effective Recruitment Process for your business next week.  If you’re looking for support with your Data Science hiring process, get in touch with one of our expert consultants and we'll able to advise you on the best way forward. 

The Next Generation Of French Web Analysts

The Next Generation Of French Web Analysts

The role and purpose of Web Analysts has evolved over the last few years, and now there are a number of different types of candidate profile across the French marketplace. Whilst, traditionally, Web Analysts focused on Data pulled from websites before using their findings to make business recommendations on how to improve the site and streamline user experience.  However, as, digital channels, including apps, social media and mobile devices have multiplied, the amount of Data available to gather insights from has increased dramatically. Web Analytics has become Digital Analytics as a result of the need to quantify and better understand customer behaviour regardless of the channel or device used.  Across the world’s leading technology hubs, the role of the Digital Analyst is no longer to just relay insights from a company’s website, but to analyse different Data sources, work with complex technologies and tell stories with their findings. We’re now seeing the same evolution take place across the French market.  Today's Web Analysts  Throughout the era of digital measurement and optimisation tools, the use of AB tests and MVT tests has allowed Web Analysts to trial different online solutions for their enterprises. Nevertheless, until recently, these have remained centred on only one channel; the website. Over recent years, however, new categories of Analytics have now emerged, all of which need to be viewed as equally important:  In-store Analytics: The measurement of physical store Data, a real-world equivalent of web analytics. Mobile Analytics: The analysis of users’ traffic and behaviour on mobile sites and applications. Social Analytics: The analysis of Data from social networks such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.  As a result of this diversification, businesses are now not only looking for technical Web Analysts who can work with Google Analytics or Adobe Analytics and implement tags with GTM or DTM. There is now an appetite to go further and deeper with their analysis and Web Analysts who can use tools such as Big Query/ SQL, R or Python are high in-demand. A candidate with ‘Data Web’ vision, a strong knowledge of Data and KPIs in different business models, stands out amongst ever-increasing competition.  Furthermore, as Web Analysts use a lot of Data, particularly personal Data, a strong knowledge of GDPR and the legal implications of their work are also incredibly beneficial.  In other words, Web Analysts are becoming more versatile. No longer siloed to their own space, Web Analysts should have experience of collaborating with marketing and technical teams, as well as to top management and senior stakeholders.  Tomorrow's Web Analytics With this progression of Analytics tools and skillsets, Digital Analysts are now playing a more important role in businesses than ever before.  As they continue to present new ways of interpreting and visualising Data, their impact on the bottom line is being felt more significantly than ever.   As a result, Web Analysts are now open to significantly more professional opportunities. Specifically, if they have a strong technical skillset and a business mindset, they can move into a Digital Business Analyst or Data Scientist position. This means that the best candidates are in incredibly high-demand and businesses need to be sure of what skillset they need before beginning a recruitment process.  For example, a company recently going through a big change in tools migration, such as moving from Adobe to GA, would be in need of a strong technical Web Analyst who can implement those tools. A business that is further down the line with their capabilities, on the other hand, may be looking for a candidate with a real business vision, in additional to an analytical skillset, who can make informed business recommendations. Whilst the French market may be in transition, we’re already seeing these changes take place in other regions. In the UK, there is a large amount of conversation around ‘Digital Intelligence’, and Web Analysts are now beginning to be viewed as important as Data Scientists within many leading organisations, partially because these roles are overlapping more and more. In fact, the lack of appreciation for Web Analysts in France is a point of contention for many candidates, something that was discussed frequently at this year’s MeasureCamp Paris.  Businesses who are looking to hire, and retain, Web Analysts need to be aware of this mindset. Candidates often share their apprehensions around the lack of training offered within their companies, as well as concerns about investment in their area. As Web Analysts continue to upskill, enterprises need to make sure they continue to offer growth, opportunity and a good working environment, particularly if they are seeking domestic talent.  Whether you are looking to expend your Web Analytics function or take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expect consultants to find out more. 

How AI Will Revolutionise CRM

How AI Will Revolutionise CRM

If we can be sure of anything in today’s business climate, it is that new trends will emerge and disrupt, new technologies will continue to be developed and attract hype, and companies will be left to navigate a landscape of opportunity and uncertainty. Customer Relationship Management is an upright concept or strategy to solidify relations with customers whilst at the same time reducing cost and enhancing productivity and profitability in business. CRM systems provide a well-defined platform for all business units to interact with their customers and fulfil all their needs and demands in order to build long-term relationships. Every business unit has an emphasis on developing long-term relationships with customers in order to nurture their stability in today’s blooming market. Customer’s expectations are now not only limited to get best products and services, they also need a face-to-face business in which they want to receive exactly what they demand and in a quick time. New Look CRM CRM is vital for the success of any organisation that seeks to continuously build relationships and manage countless interactions with customers. Now CRM systems bring together customer Data from a multitude of different sources, delivering it to all customer-facing employees to provide a complete picture of each customer across all department Today, there is a ton of available information across many devices and platforms. Companies need a way to integrate this “Big Data” into their intelligent CRM that can produce predictive results. The Value of AI Artificial Intelligence (AI) CRM systems built on Machine Learning algorithms now have the ability to learn from past experience or historical Data. Having these insights at the disposal of any customer-facing employee (sales, support, marketing, etc.) empowers a business to build deeper relationships with its customers. As a result, integrating AI and Machine Learning with CRM can deliver more predictive and personalised customer information in all areas of your business. By predicting customer behaviour, companies can take personalised actions to avoid the use of invasive advertising and to provide material of real interest to each prospect. There is no question personalising communications to customers has become critical. Today’s buyers demand more than a “spray-and-pray” email blast. A recent McKinsey study found that personalisation can lift sales by 10% or more. The analysis also showed that by personalising just 20% of email content, open rates increased more than 40& on average. Reply rates also increased a whopping 112%. As a CRM stores all the information in one centralised place, this makes it a lot easier to analyse your performance as a whole. This helps businesses build a relationship with their customers that, in turn, creates loyalty and customer retention. Since customer loyalty and revenue are both qualities that affect a company's revenue, a strong CRM have a direct result in increased profits for a business.  Those that use Big Data & Analytics effectively show productivity rates and profitability that are higher than competitors and those that put Data at the centre of their marketing efforts improve their ROI by 15-20%.  AI and CRM AI is becoming an ever-present theme across a variety of industries, from healthcare and retail to software development and finance. CRM vendors are no different; over the past year, numerous CRM vendors have introduced AI components into their product offerings. AI will develop in parallel with user interactions using various touch points within CRM and evolve continuously to deliver more intelligent and personalised actions. Learning critical patterns will also enable AI-infused CRM to automate certain actions, decrease the manual work required, and empower sales and marketing professionals to work more efficiently and effectively. The inefficient processes that hinder CRM will no longer be acceptable, and AI-powered automation will play a much bigger role in streamlining workflows. The rise of AI presents businesses with a wide array of unique benefits and opportunities. It can empower them to provide better, more relevant experiences to their customers and forge bonds with them in a way that was simply not possible before.  It’s estimated that 85% of businesses will start implementing AI solutions for their CRM by 2020. It seems inevitable that with further advancements, AI will move from a novelty tool to a must-have feature and dire necessity of every business. If you’re looking for to build a team of CRM experts, or to take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Web Analytics have long been used to help companies understand their customers’ online behaviour, extracting and interrogating an abundance of information; from time spent on pages to bounce rates and conversion rates. Having provided a lot of insight as to what customer are doing online, these techniques have been less useful for understanding why they do it. This is where psychology comes in. As the why of Web Analytics becomes more and more important, with companies always looking ways to edge out the competition, there are more links to psychological principles than you might expect.  Of course, traditional Web Analytics and metrics remain very important. However, what psychology can do is help us speculate as to why customers may be behaving the way they do and, by doing so, allow businesses to make more informed changes to their websites, or conduct more conscious testing.  Without directly asking we will never know the real reason behind customer’s actions, but we can use a number of established psychological constructs to make well informed assumptions. We can then work this backwards and use these constructs to make changes to our sites that will fall in line with these assumptions in order to convert more customers.  Familiarity People tend to favour that which they are familiar with, whether it be items of clothing that match their preferred style or holidays like ones they have been on before. A customer visiting a page to find a series of unfamiliar products is more likely to leave without making a purchase. This is why personalisation is important; it gets rid of unnecessary information and leaves the user with products they are more likely to want.  By working backwards, businesses can personalise their sites to each individual customer. If you’ve ever bought an item of clothing from an online shop only to be shown a number of similar items the next time you log on, you’ll know what I’m talking about. The thinking is that, as these items are more familiar to you, you’ll be more likely to either purchase them, or remain on the site to purchase something else.  Social Proof  Research into social proof has shown psychologists that the more people who reinforce a certain concept, the more likely it is that other individuals will perceive it as correct. This heuristic is used widely by companies like Just Eat and Deliveroo who allow customers to leave comments about their restaurants and give them a star rating. It is much more likely that conversion rate will be higher on restaurants with better reviews as the rating allows the customer to make a quick judgments on its quality.  Scarcity This is a cognitive bias where humans put more value on things that are scarce over those that are in abundance. If one site is showing a product with no indication to the quantity left but another company is showing a similar product where there are only three left, the customer is more likely to convert on the second site. Where an item is nearly unavailable, this suggests a number of things; it is more valuable and it is desired by more people (social proof) etc. Companies like Amazon and Asos use this technique by showing visitors when an item is low in stock or even showing how few are left, giving them an edge on conversion over their competitors.   Web Analysts and CRO professionals should take note of user psychology and start to implement it in their day to day practice. In fact, some might be already without even knowing the fundamentals of the psychology behind these techniques. Applying the above techniques and testing these ideas could produce a boost in conversion that simple changes to user experience, like changing the position of the checkout basket, aren’t providing.  A number of businesses are now looking for Analysts who can explain why customers are behaving in a certain way and tell a story with the Data, rather than just explaining what was found. Finding someone with this deeper understanding of user psychology has therefore an integral part to many hiring processes. By looking into this area, candidates are likely to increase their chances of securing the role they want.  Whether you’re looking to expand your Web Analytics function or want to take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

L’Internalisation Des Achats Media En France

La data est aujourd’hui au cœur de toutes les stratégies digitales et media et les entreprises expriment de plus en plus la volonté de reprendre la main sur leurs investissements media et digitaux Analytics. Nous remarquons donc une tendance d’internalisation où les sociétés souhaitent intégrer les expertises des agences au sein de leurs équipes. Obstacle ou réelle opportunité pour les agences media et pour les candidats?  C’est déjà une réalité en Angleterre et aux Etats-Unis depuis plusieurs années où 80% des sociétés ont internalisé tout ou partie de leur conseil et leur achat d’espace publicitaire (autrement dit, une partie de leur marketing et de leur expertise sur le conseil et les médias).  A contrario, en France, nous sommes légèrement plus en retard. Air France a été précurseur de cette internalisation et cela leur a permis d’économiser 20% dans leurs achats d’espace. Néanmoins, il est impossible pour toutes les entreprises d’internaliser 100% de leurs activités publicitaires digitales, car un appui externe leur sera toujours nécessaire - les agences médias ont pour but de proposer les outils et technos à la pointe du marché et c’est un métier à part entière.  COMMENT FONCTIONNE L’INTERNALISATION?  L’internalisation ne pourra se faire que de manière progressive, car c’est un processus long et complexe (on parle même de plusieurs années lors de ce type de changement/restructuration qui impact directement les organisations en interne), qui mobilisera très certainement plusieurs business unit. Ce qui permet aux agences médias d’appréhender et de proposer en amont des solutions compatibles avec les besoins clients.  L’idée est d’accompagner et de former les équipes du client final pour les aider à internaliser un ou plusieurs leviers digitaux (composantes essentielles des stratégies digitale pour développer la présence de leurs clients sur la toile). Cela a débuté avec le SEA (Paid media) et ensuite tout le programmatique a suivi comme l’achat d’espaces publicitaires, le display et les réseaux sociaux. Cette équipe travaillerait directement en régie pour auditer les campagnes et accompagner sur du conseil et tout le long de la transformation digitale.   QUEL EST L’IMPACT SUR LES AGENCES ET SUR LES CANDIDATS? En France, les agences media baignent dans le digital depuis longtemps et leur expérience et expertise est extrêmement forte. Les sociétés auront toujours besoins de l’intervention de spécialistes. En effet, ce n’est pas le métier de la société mais celui de l’agence spécialisée que de se tenir en veille régulièrement et d’investir dans de nouvelles technos ( et les tester encore et encore). Autrement dit, ce métier demande autant de l’investissement en terme de temps que de montée en compétences régulière en très peu de temps.  Dans ce cadre, l’impact que les agences pourraient avoir sur la transformation digitale des sociétés avec lesquelles elles collaborent pourrait être très large et c’est la possibilité pour les agences média de peser d’avantage dans la stratégie digitale globale des annonceurs. Cette situation est donc d’avantage une opportunité à saisir par les agences plutôt qu’un obstacle à proprement parler. Côté candidats, de nouvelles opportunités d’évolution s’ouvrent. L’évolution de leurs expertises est impressionnante, que ce soit dans l’UX, la data ou l’Analytics, cela leur permet d’apporter de nouvelles solutions tant en interne en tant que consultant ou directement chez le client. Les postes qui en découlent seront principalement des postes de Media Trader, Traffic Manager Display, Expert SEA, Digital Data Analyst, Social Analytics, etc.  Dans cette logique de créer de la valeur et de se réinventer chaque jour, les agences offrent de plus en plus un accompagnement personnalisé ce qui leur permet de se différencier de la concurrence. Si vous êtes à la recherche de profils Analytics ou un candidat curieux d’en savoir plus sur les évolutions de carrière qui s’offrent à lui, vous pouvez me contacter par email.

FROM HEALTHCARE TO HOSPITALITY HOW BIG DATA TRANSFORMS INDUSTRY

From Healthcare to Hospitality: How Big Data Transforms Industry

Big Data, once a looming anomaly for many businesses, has transformed. No longer a buzzword, it is essential to enterprises everywhere – from healthcare to hospitality. Whilst it’s taken about a decade to get here, the last two years are truly telling.  With the amount of Data flowing through our systems, over 2 quintillion bytes each day. Think Apple Pay at Starbucks, credit card purchase, filling out of forms, GPS, our phone Data, traffic cameras and lights for traffic control. Big data is now big business. Top Industries Using Big Data and Analytics While the most prevalent industries which come to mind are retail, entertainment, and politics. There are two which, until now, have been coming in under the radar and have seen some of the biggest changes using Data & Analytics; healthcare and hospitality. Whilst they don’t seem to go together, they do have one thing in common – the experience. Hospitality  As you plan for your next vacation, you may be debating the merits of a hotel reservation versus an AirBnB. Lodging options in the share-economy have forced traditional accommodation options to rethink their strategies. The ease of “mobile first” which allows customers to manage their bookings, stays, and travel experience through their phones is in direction opposition to the client-facing hotel industry.  There is a massive shift happening in this industry and a powerful Data Analytics tool can help create visualisations from a company’s Data. Not only can these provide insights for the future, but they also offer suggestions for strategies which can be implemented now to impact future prospects. Healthcare  One of the most telling industries being transformed by Big Data is healthcare. Access to care is not only available in-office, in-person, but now with the advent of Telemedicine, patients can get questions even more quickly. No matter the industry today, this is a buyer’s market, or in most cases, a customer’s market. And its customer satisfaction which drives the success of a business. In healthcare, it’s patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction scores underlies everything from hospital funding to the return visits in the private sector. Like any business, the patient experience in the healthcare industry, begins with initial contact, staff responsiveness, communication by doctors and nurses, wait times, even equipment and cleanliness of facilities to name a few examples. Once all the Data and information is gathered, collected, and analysed, these healthcare professionals are able to make any necessary adjustments. As quickly as Data has grown in the last couple of years, the projections for healthcare can expect to see a high volume in the next seven years. One of the highest benefits which can add to patient experience is the database of patient’s information can be shared across healthcare organisations saving time, money, and patient stress which all leads to better treatment for the patient’s needs.  In fact, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC), healthcare Data is expected to grow faster than industries such as the media, manufacturing, or financial services. Advancements such as chatbots, virtual assistants, Big Data Analytic tools, and medical imaging have all added to the transformation.  As strong and as prevalent as many of these advances are, many organisations still struggle to find the right candidates with the right Data skill sets. Many have neither a blockchain strategy nor have plans to implement one and are falling behind. There is a next generation opportunity here to more fully transform digitally, but the right people need to be in place to make it happen. Digital transformation isn’t slowing down and is becoming more critical at a rapid rate. By making investments in your health IT, analytics tools, and people, you’ll be ready to close the digital transformation gap. If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics with an eye toward the Life Sciences field, we may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more. 

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