Web Analyst jobs

“Web Analyst” jobs measure, collect, analyse, and report on web data for the purpose of understanding and optimising web usage. Whilst some recruiters may just send any old candidate your way in the hopes they’ll be good enough, that’s not the Harnham way.

What We Do

We help the best talent in the Web Analyst market find rewarding careers.

We learn how our clients operate and the culture within their offices. This allows us to match businesses with a candidate who we are certain will prove to be a profitable addition to both their company and culture.

Over the past few years there has been a steep increase in the demand for expert Web Analysts; those who work effectively within Digital Analytics marketing, using web analytics tools to help improve a business’s web presence. No longer just an important role, Web Analysts are becoming a necessity. 

discover new trends

Whilst a company may easily be able to find information telling them where their profits are coming from, this is no longer enough.

As Digital Analytics marketing evolves, so does the need for identifying various forms of traffic.

We specialise in the data and analytics industry and we’re passionate about it. With an eye toward trends in the industry, we pair excellent talent with pioneering organisations and use our experiences to produce annual salary reports based on our own client and candidate data.

If you’re aiming to get ahead of the curve, or simply want to apply your expert analysis somewhere new, contact us today


Latest Jobs

Salary

US$100000 - US$120000 per year

Location

New York

Description

This world-leading Digital Experience agency is looking for a new Digital Analytics Manager to come on board to deliver data-driven creative insights!

Salary

£450 - £550 per day

Location

City of London, London

Description

Technical product manager to join a leading start up for 3 months initially in central London.

Salary

£30000 - £40000 per annum

Location

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire

Description

Really well known tech company looking for a Tealium focused engineer

Salary

£25000 - £35000 per annum

Location

London

Description

A well known digital marketing agency require a web analyst in a relaxed, flat structured office!

Salary

£50000 - £60000 per annum

Location

London

Description

Looking for a Senior Digital Analyst with 3+ years of experience & line management experience too!

Salary

€45000 - €50000 per annum

Location

La Rochelle, Poitou-Charentes

Description

En tant que Web Analyst vous serez responsable de tous les projets digitaux de vos clients.

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Web analytics recruitment in 2015

The UK analytics market is an ever-shifting landscape, with technical skills that flit in and out of favour more frequently than primary school playground friendships. Recruiting into this market, we at Harnham find the demand for analysts with up-to-date skill sets is a constant. The subtle variants required within these skill-sets coupled with the proficiencies we need to find, seem to also evolve on almost a monthly basis. This means that Harnham need to be as agile in our practices as the candidates we source.  This is nevermore clearly illustrated by the fact that one month we can be scouring the country for highly technical Tag Management specialists, and the next, our focus shifts to sourcing 8 new Conversion Rate Optimisation specialists. Moving on to next month, pinning down the elusive and much sought-after Web Analytics / BI / Computer Science / Statistical modelling expert (aka. The mythical “Analytics Unicorn”). The Benefit of Forward Thinking Skillsets The diversity of technical requirements should give tremendous encouragement to any analyst looking to find work – regardless of background and skill-set you possess; there will definitely be no shortage of suitors clamouring for the right expertise. However, it is prudent to be ever mindful, that with this exciting and evolving landscape, there are also risks attached. How often have you heard stories of promised roles not being fulfilled by companies? Or about analysts who join a company to do a specific job, and then have their career development curtailed by lack of long-term strategy, or a lack of knowledge of what to do next for the team? This kind of thing is and does happen regularly. Yet, hope is at hand. If you were to cast your gaze across the Atlantic Ocean to our American cousins, you would find that Analytics is a settled and well established practice, where Chief Data Officers regularly sit on the board and the Analysts control business strategy. Becoming a Unicorn Harnham’s team in New York City have found the lines between offline and online blur when stateside – Web Analysts do advanced statistical analysis and modelling, Stats Analysts measure conversion rates and so on and so on.  The US is trying to breed their own “Unicorns”, rather than chase them. As the dust starts to settle in the UK, and the market definition solidifies to become as robust as it is in the States; teams will grow and budgets will increase as the market develops. The senior analysts of today will become the thought leaders and managers of tomorrow.

From Idea to Impact: How Charities Use Data

It’s that time of year again. As the festive season draws near and we pull together wish lists, many of us also begin to think about how we can give back. Given that the UK spent over £7 billion this Black Friday and Cyber Monday weekend, it’s not surprising that the idea of Giving Tuesday is becoming more and more popular.  But with 160,000 registered charities in the UK alone, institutions are turning to data to find new ways to stand out and make a greater impact.  Far from just running quarterly reports, charities are now utilising the insights they gain from data to inform their strategies, improve their services and plan for the future.  IDEAS Given that not every charity is lucky enough to go viral with an Ice Bucket Challenge style video, there is a need to find other ways to stand out in such a crowded market. As such, many are looking to the data they have collected to help create a strategy. Macmillan Cancer Support, one the UK’s biggest charities, wanted to see more success from one of their main fundraisers, ‘The World’s Biggest Coffee Morning’. The event, which sees volunteers hold coffee and cake-fuelled gatherings across the country was revolutionised by data. By engaging with their database and researching what motivated fundraisers, they refocused their marketing around how the occasion could create an opportunity for people to meet up and chat, such as swapping ‘send for your free fundraising pack’ for ‘order your free coffee morning kit’. Whilst these amends may seem superficial, they had a major impact increasing funds raised from £15m to £20m.  Some brands have taken this idea even further, using Data & Analytics tools to engage with potential donors. Homelessness charity Cyrenians’ data told them that there were a number of misconceptions about rough sleepers, including 15% of people believing that they were homeless by choice. To counter this they created an AI chatbot, named Alex, that allowed users to ask questions they may not have been comfortable asking a real person.  Another charity using data tools to counter common misconceptions is Dyslexia Association. Their Moment of Dyslexia campaign saw them utilise facial recognition technology; the longer a person looked at their digital poster, the more jumbled up the words and letters became. By harnessing both insights and the technology made possible by data, they were able to offer an insight into what dyslexia is like for people who previously didn’t understand.  INDIVIDUALS A big issue facing a number of charities is trust. Following a series of recent scandals, the public are more sceptical than ever of how charities are run, and their use of data is no exception. This ‘trust deficit’ has resulted in vast amount of potential donors staying away, with recent research highlighting that only 11% of people are willing to share their data with a charity, even if it means a better service.  Whilst charities with effective Data Governance are able to use their vast amount of data to enhance those business, those who mismanage it are likely to suffer. Following a cyber-attack that exposed the data of over 400,000 donors, the British and Foreign Bible Society were fined £100,000. As hackers were able to enter the network by exploiting a weak password, this serves as a timely reminder that our data needs not only to be clean, but secure.  Financial implications aside, improper data usage can also do irreversible damage to a charity’s reputation. St Mungo’s has faced criticism for passing information about migrant homeless people to the Home Office, putting them at risk of deportation. Whilst they were cleared of any wrongdoing by the ICO, this controversial use of data has had a negative impact on the charity’s image. With a decline in the number of people donating to charity overall, anything that can put people off further is bad news.  IMPACT Whilst there is more demand than ever for charities to share their impact data, there is also more opportunity. With Lord Gus O’Donnell urging charities to make data an ‘organisation-wide priority’, many are going beyond publishing annual reports and fully embracing a culture shift. Youth charity Keyfund have been able to justify how the spend their funds based on their impact data. Having heard concerns from fundraisers regarding whether their leisure projects were effective they looked at the data they had gathered from the 6,000 young people they were helping. What they found was that not only were their leisure projects effective, they had an even more positive impact than their alternatives, particularly for those from the most deprived area. This allowed them to continue to support these programs and even increase funding where necessary. Going one step further are Street League, a charity that use sports programmes to tackle youth unemployment. Rather than share their impact data in quarterly, or even annual, reports they moved to real-time reporting. Interested parties can visit an ‘Online Impact Dashboard’ and see up-to-the-minute data about how the charity’s work is impacting the lives of the people it is trying to help. This not only allows for the most relevant data to be used strategically, but also supports the business holistically, gaining donor both attention and trust. To stand out in the charity sector institutions need to take advantage of data. Not only can this be used to generate campaigns and streamline services but, when used securely and transparently, it can help rebuild trust and offer a competitive edge.  If you want to make the world a better place by harnessing and analysing data, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to see how we can help you. 

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