The Transformative Nature of Data Science

Kristianna Chung our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 6/18/2020 1:35 PM
What does Data tell us? Why do we want to know the information we collect and analyze? How can Data help us now? Well, sometimes you have to go back to basics. Knowing your Data helps you make better decisions for the future. This is the transformative nature of Data Science. 

The Data Scientists have collected is leading toward a vaccine for a novel virus. Our massive shift from in-house workers to working from home showed us where the gaps in our internet infrastructure existed. But, the information we gathered wasn’t just where the gaps occurred, it also offers a jumping off point for how we can use what we’ve learned to improve. 

We know Data is essential to business today, but how we use it, and gathering what we can learn from it, offer transformative advantages we might have otherwise missed.

WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Data Science is what helps us interpret the massive amounts of Data we’ve collected. With an estimated 90 percent of Data created just in the last couple of years, and an estimated dearth of connected devices estimated to grow over 75 billion by 2025, the sheer volume is daunting.

Yet we still have need for change. Technologies to interpret Data at such a massive scale still need someone to gather, collect, analyze, and interpret the information. What we’ve learned so far with Data Science shows us what must change to support health workers, the health of our employees, the support of remote workers and gig workers, and how businesses can differentiate themselves from their competitors in a post pandemic world.

SEVEN WAYS ORGANIZATIONS CAN PREPARE FOR THE FUTURE

  1. Prioritize Digital Collaboration
    As employees begin to return to ‘normal’ work hours, Gartner suggests 48% of employees will work remotely. This is an 18% increase pre-pandemic. So, when hiring managers take stock of their employees, they’ll want to consider things such as productivity and performance management and how workers are evaluated based remote working touchpoints rather than established criteria of employee performance management.
  2. Ensure Inclusivity of Employees 
    Bring employees into more critical roles and give them the freedom to make mission critical decisions.
  3. Open Up Opportunities and Develop Critical Skillsets
    Coach employees on how to develop critical skills for a variety of roles, rather than focusing on one particular role.
  4. Be Flexible
    The days of doing things ‘the way we we’ve always done’ are gone. It’s time to reassess, reevaluate, and prepare your employees for success. How? Consider what may may be needed for a given role’s development path. Do your employees need reskilling or upskilling? 
    Flexible careers. The gig economy. The freelance economy. Contractors. All these titles and labels offer flexible learning and training allowing your business to pivot smoothly and efficiently as needed. Training is the key here and it will help employees transition into other organizations, into roles with greater responsibility, and allow both your employees and your organization to adapt to changes more quickly.
  5. Teach Employees to Respond Rather than React
    Structure your organization and employee response to quickly course correct. Don’t assume or target a core set of future skills. We don’t know what the future holds or what skills may be needed. But if you have employees with wide interests, your business may be better positioned to make changes as needed.
  6. Implement a Culture of Inclusiveness – Remote vs. In-House Employees
    Diversity is an important part of any business. But with the rise of remote workers, it’s time to ensure all workers are supported in regard to healthcare coverage, mental support, and financial health pre-and post-pandemic.
    Inclusiveness can help to engage those workers both in-house and remote to ensure everyone feels part of the team. Devices such as VR, AR, video calls, and more can help to make every employee feel part of the company culture.
  7. Encourage Data Literacy Throughout Your Organization
    Everyone in your organization will need to be Data literate. Yet everyone will be at a different level of literacy. Here it’s important to define both the skills and capability. Once your leadership has a firm grasp of the Data provided to them by your Data Scientists and business intelligence analysts, then they’ll have a starting point from which to make informed decisions.

Building a culture of Data begins with leadership. Are you ready for the role or are you an organization looking for someone to fill this role?

Business processes have shifted online, looking for your next job has become more daunting than ever before. But here’s the good news. Everyone’s on the same page. Leaders, hiring managers, recruiters, and prospective employees are all navigating a new way of doing business and finding talent to keep those businesses running. 

If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics or other Data professional opportunities, check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  

For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  

For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.