Privacy Notice



FRENCH TRANSLATION GERMAN TRANSLATION



Harnham Search and Selection 
Privacy Notice
1. General
1.1 Harnham Search and Selection Limited together with its group companies (“we”, “us” or “Harnham”) take the privacy of your information very seriously. This Privacy Notice is designed to tell you about our practices regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information which may be collected in person from you, obtained via our websites or collected through other means such as by an online form, email, or telephone communication.
1.2 This notice applies to personal information provided by our clients and suppliers about their employees and other individuals affiliated with them and also to candidates or prospective candidates (“Candidates”) whose data we process for proposed roles with our clients or prospective clients. Where a given role with our client is to be filled by a limited company or other corporate contractor we may process data relating to that company’s directors or shareholders and in this policy a “Candidate” may include directors and shareholders of corporate contractors. 
1.3 In this notice “you” refers to any individual whose personal data we hold or process (i.e: an individual candidate or potential candidate, an individual affiliated with a corporate contractor candidate, or an individual or employee associated or affiliated with our client or supplier.
1.4 In general, our services are related to the provision of recruitment services to clients and we do not process personal data on a large scale, but we will hold certain data in relation to Candidates and individuals affiliated with our clients and suppliers, and this notice sets out the basis on which we hold that data.
1.5 This notice is governed by the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) from 25 May 2018.
2. Legal Basis on which we process personal data
2.1 Personal data we hold about you will be processed either because:
2.1.1 the processing is necessary in order for us to comply with our obligations under a contract between you and us, specifically for the provision of our services; or
2.1.2 the processing is necessary in pursuit of a “legitimate interest”, a legitimate interest in this context means a valid interest we have or a third party has in processing your personal data which is not overridden by your interests in data privacy and security
2.1.3 for certain ‘special categories’ of sensitive personal data including data relating to health and ethnic background which we may process from time to time we will process this data on the basis of your consent.

Harnham Search and Selection

Privacy Notice

1.                 General

1.1 Harnham Search and Selection Limited together with its group companies (“we”, “us” or “Harnham”) take the privacy of your information very seriously. This Privacy Notice is designed to tell you about our practices regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information which may be collected in person from you, obtained via our websites or collected through other means such as by an online form, email, or telephone communication.

1.2 This notice applies to personal information provided by our clients and suppliers about their employees and other individuals affiliated with them and also to candidates or prospective candidates (“Candidates”) whose data we process for proposed roles with our clients or prospective clients. Where a given role with our client is to be filled by a limited company or other corporate contractor we may process data relating to that company’s directors or shareholders and in this policy a “Candidate” may include directors and shareholders of corporate contractors.

1.3 In this notice “you” refers to any individual whose personal data we hold or process (i.e: an individual candidate or potential candidate, an individual affiliated with a corporate contractor candidate, or an individual or employee associated or affiliated with our client or supplier).

1.4 In general, our services are related to the provision of recruitment services to clients and Candidates, and the provision of recruitment and market related information to clients and Candidates, and we do not process personal data on a large scale, but we will hold certain data in relation to Candidates and individuals affiliated with our clients and suppliers, and this notice sets out the basis on which we hold that data.

1.5 This notice is governed by the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) from 25 May 2018.


2. Legal Basis on which we process personal data

2.1  Personal data we hold about you will be processed either because:

2.1.1 the processing is necessary in order for us to comply with our obligations under a contract between you and us, specifically for the provision of our services; or

2.1.2 the processing is necessary in pursuit of a “legitimate interest”, a legitimate interest in this context means a valid interest we have or a third party has in processing your personal data which is not overridden by your interests in data privacy and security

2.1.3 for certain ‘special categories’ of sensitive personal data including data relating to health and ethnic background which we may process from time to time we will process this data on the basis of your consent.


3. Personal data we collect

3.1  We may collect and process the following personal data (information that can be uniquely identified with you) about you:

3.1.1 for individuals associated with our clients we may hold contact information such as names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Client Contact Information”);

3.1.2 for individuals associated with our suppliers and other third parties we interact with we may hold contact information such as names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Third Party Contact Information”);

3.1.3 for Candidates we may have personal information about you, your background, work history etc. This information may include name, address, telephone number, email address, CV, work history, educational qualifications (“Candidate Information”);

3.1.4 a record of any correspondence or communication between you and us (“Communication Information”);

3.1.5 marketing information we may hold about you in order to provide information about our services (as set out in clause 1.4); this may include names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Marketing Information”).

3.2 We will collect information either from you directly or from a third party (for instance your employer, a job site or social media platform you have registered with, or an introducer). If we do obtain your personal data from a third party your privacy rights under this notice are not affected and you are still able to exercise the rights contained within this notice.

3.3  Although you do not have to supply any personal information to us in practice we may be unable to provide our services to you without personal data (for instance we will need contact information in order to communicate with you). You may withdraw our authority to process your personal data (or request that we restrict our processing) at any time but there are circumstances in which we may need to continue to process personal data (please see below).


4.  How we process your personal data 

4.1 Please see the table below, which sets out the manner in which we will process the different types of personal data we hold:

Purpose/Activity

Type of data

Lawful basis for processing including basis of legitimate interest

When we are setting up a retainer or engagement with a client or potential client with whom you are associated or entering into an agreement to provide services to our client.

Client Contact Information

Communication Information

Performance of a contract

Necessary for our legitimate interests (to establish necessary information about you in order to provide our services)

When we research, locate and record information relating to Candidates.

Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver recruitment services to our clients and Candidates in the interests of the clients and Candidates).

When we provide information relating to Candidates to our clients or potential clients.

Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients and Candidates in the interests of the clients and Candidates).

When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our client or potential client in order to provide our services to you.

Client Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients).

When we communicate with you as a Candidate or an individual associated with our Candidate in order to provide our services to you, including using other communication technology, such as chatbot technology.

Candidate Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients and Candidates in the interests of clients and Candidates).

When we store information relating to Candidates in order to put Candidates forward for potential roles in the future.

Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients and Candidates in the interests of the clients and  Candidates).

When we enter into an agreement with you or an organisation with which you are connected as a supplier.

Third Party Contact Information

Communication Information.

Performance of a contract with you

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services).

When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our supplier or another third party we interact with.

Third Party Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract with you

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients and Candidates).

When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our client, potential client about our services (for instance if you request assistance).

Client Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract with you

Necessary for our legitimate interests (for running our business and to provide our clients and Candidates with our services)

To manage our relationship with you as our client, supplier or third party.

 

Client Contact Information

Third Party Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract with you.

Necessary to comply with a legal obligation.

Necessary for our legitimate interests in ensuring that we maintain good relationships with our clients, suppliers and third parties.

To store your contact information for marketing purposes and sending marketing and other promotional communications to you.

Client Contact Information

Candidate Information

Marketing Information

 

Necessary for our legitimate interests in promoting our services to business customers or Clients, or consumers with consent or because the relevant individual has purchased similar services from us.

 

For each type of data listed above, definitions are included under clause 3.1.


5.  Data Retention

5.1 Our current data retention policy is to delete or destroy (to the extent we are able to) the personal data we hold about you in accordance with the following:

Category of personal data

Length of retention

Records relevant for tax authorities

8 years from the end of the year to which the records relate

Candidate Data

The later of 7 years from placing a Candidate in a given role with our client, or in the case of contractors, 7 years from the end of the role with our client, or 7 years from the last date on which you have interacted with us.

Candidate Data where we have researched and located Candidate Data without direct interaction

1 year from date of data collection

Personal data processed in relation to a contract between you and us

7 years from either the end of the contract or the date you last used our services, being the length of time following a breach of contract in which you are entitled to make a legal claim.

Personal data held on marketing or business development records

3 years from the last date on which you have interacted with us.

 

5.2 For any category of personal data not specifically defined in this notice, and unless otherwise specified by applicable law, the required retention period for any personal data will be deemed to be 7 years from the date of receipt by us of that data.

5.3 The retention periods stated in this notice can be prolonged or shortened as may be required (for example, in the event that legal proceedings apply to the data or if there is an on-going investigation into the data).

5.4 We review the personal data (and the categories of personal data) we are holding on a regular basis to ensure the data we are holding is still relevant to our business and is accurate. If we discover that certain data we are holding is no longer necessary or accurate, we will take reasonable steps to correct or delete this data as may be required.

5.5 If you wish to request that data we hold about you is amended or deleted, please refer to clause 8 below, which explains your privacy rights.


6. Sharing your information

6.1  We do not disclose any information you provide to any third parties other than as follows:

6.1.1 We will disclose Candidate Data to our clients or potential clients and our clients will be the data controller for that Candidate Data;

6.1.2 We may disclose information to our group companies;

6.1.3 if we are under a duty to disclose or share your personal data in order to comply with any legal obligation (for example, if required to do so by a court order or for the purposes of prevention of fraud or other crime);

6.1.4 in order to enforce any terms and conditions or agreements for our services that may apply;

6.1.5 If we are sub-contracting services to a third party we may provide information to that third party in order to provide the relevant services;

6.1.6 we may transfer your personal information to a third party as part of a sale of some or all of our business and assets to any third party or as part of any business restructuring or reorganisation, but we will take steps with the aim of ensuring that your privacy rights continue to be protected;

6.1.7 to protect our rights, property and safety, or the rights, property and safety of our users or any other third parties. This includes exchanging information with other companies and organisations for the purposes of fraud protection and credit risk reduction.

6.2 Other than as set out above, we shall not disclose any of your personal information unless you give us permission to do so. If we do supply your personal information to a third party we will take steps to ensure that your privacy rights are protected and that third party complies with the terms of this notice.


7. Security 

7.1 We will take all reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate technical and organisational measures are carried out in order to safeguard the information we collect from you and protect against unlawful access and accidental loss or damage. These measures may include (as necessary):

7.1.1 protecting our servers with software firewalls;

7.1.2 locating our data processing storage facilities in secure locations;

7.1.3 encrypting all data stored on our server with an industry standard encryption method that encrypts the data between your computer and our server so that in the event of your network being insecure no data is passed in a format that could easily be deciphered;

7.1.4 when necessary, disposing of or deleting your data so it is done so securely;

7.1.5 regularly backing up all data we hold.

7.2 We will ensure that our employees are aware of their privacy and data security obligations. We will take reasonable steps to ensure that the employees of third parties working on our behalf are aware of their privacy and data security obligations.

7.3 This notice and our procedures for handling personal data will be reviewed as necessary.

7.4 Unfortunately, the transmission of information via the internet is not completely secure. Although we will do our best to protect your personal data, we cannot guarantee the security of your data transmitted to the Site; any transmission is at your own risk. Once we have received your information, we will use the strict procedures and security features referred to in this clause to try to prevent unauthorised access.


8. Your privacy rights

8.1 The GDPR gives you the following rights in respect of personal data we hold about you:

The right to be informed

You have a right to know about our personal data protection and data processing activities, details of which are contained in this notice.

The right of access

You can make what is known as a Subject Access Request (“SAR”) to request information about the personal data we hold about you (free of charge, save for reasonable expenses for repeat requests). If you wish to make a SAR please contact us as described below.

The right to correction

Please inform us if information we hold about you is incomplete or inaccurate in any way and we will update our records as soon as possible, but in any event within one month.

We will take reasonable steps to communicate the change to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

The right to erasure (the ‘right to be forgotten’)

Please notify us if you no longer wish us to hold personal data about you (although in practice it is not possible to provide our services without holding your personal data and we may need to keep your data in some circumstances). Unless we have reasonable grounds to refuse the erasure, on receipt of such a request we will securely delete the personal data in question within one month. The data may continue to exist in certain backup, but we will take steps to ensure that it will not be accessible.

We will communicate the erasure to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

The right to restrict processing

You can request that we no longer process your personal data in certain ways, whilst not requiring us to delete the same data. However again, some of our Services will not be available if processing is restricted.

The right to data portability

You have right to receive copies of personal data we hold about you in a commonly used and easily storable format (please let us know a format which suits you). You may also request that we transfer your personal data directly to a third party (where technically possible).

The right to object

Unless we have overriding legitimate grounds for such processing, you may object to us using your personal data for direct marketing purposes (including profiling) or for research or statistical purposes. Please notify your objection to us and we will gladly cease such processing.

Rights with respect to automated decision-making and profiling

You have a right not to be subject to automated decision-making (including profiling) when those decisions have a legal (or similarly significant effect) on you. You are not entitled to this right when the automated processing is necessary for us to perform our obligations under a contract with you, it is permitted by law, or if you have given your explicit consent.

Right to withdraw consent

If we are relying on your consent as the basis on which we are processing your personal data, you have the right to withdraw your consent at any time. Even if you have not expressly given your consent to our processing, you also have the right to object (see above).

 

8.2  All SARs and other requests or notifications in respect of your above rights must be sent to us in writing to Harnham Search and Selection Limited 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon SW19 7QW, dataprotection@harnham.com.

8.3 We will endeavour to comply with such requests as soon as possible but in any event we will comply within one month of receipt (unless a longer period of time to respond is reasonable by virtue of the complexity or number of your requests).


9. Data Breaches

9.1 If personal data we hold about you is subject to a breach or unauthorised disclosure or access, we will report this to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and/or our data protection manager.

9.2 If a breach is likely to result in a risk to your data rights and freedoms, we will notify you as soon as possible.


10. Transferring your information outside Europe

10.1 As part of the services provided to our clients offered to you the information you provide to us may be transferred to, processed and stored at, countries or international organisations outside of the EEA.

10.2 Our client may be based outside of the EEA and we may transfer personal data to our client outside of the EEA. For instance we may transfer Candidate Information to our client outside of the EEA where this is necessary to perform a contract between us and the client and this is in the interests of the Candidate.

10.3 Data may be processed by our group companies based outside of the EEA, but we will ensure that any data accessible by our group companies will be subject to a data transfer agreement or binding corporate rules to maintain your rights as a data subject.

10.4 If you contact us while you are outside the EEA, your information may be transferred outside the EEA in order to communicate with you.

10.5 If we transfer your information outside of the EEA other than in accordance with this clause and the third country or international organisation in question has not been deemed by the EU Commission to have adequate data protection laws, we will provide appropriate safeguards and we will be responsible for ensuring your privacy rights continue to be protected as outlined in this notice.


11.  Notification of changes to the contents of this notice

We will post details of any changes to our policy on www.harnham.com to help ensure you are always aware of the information we collect, how we use it, and in what circumstances, if any, we share it with other parties.


12. Contact us

If at any time you would like to contact us with your views about our privacy practices, or with any enquiry or complaint relating to your personal information or how it is handled, you can do so via the following address: Harnham Search and Selection Limited, 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon SW19 7QW, dataprotection@harnham.com.

If we are unable to resolve any issues you may have or you would like to make a further complaint, you can contact the Information Commissioner’s Office by visiting http://www.ico.org.uk/ for further assistance.

 

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Weekly News Digest: 12th - 16th April 2021

This is Harnham’s weekly news digest, the place to come for a quick breakdown of the week’s top news stories from the world of Data & Analytics.      Express Pharma: The five biggest data challenges for life sciences Life Sciences has grown exponentially over the past 12 months. As the COVID-19 pandemic devastated the world, Life Science companies were in a race against time to create a life-changing vaccine and help us all back on the road to recovery.  In 2019, the Life Science market was valued at around $7.5bn. After this year’s influx of activity, the market is estimated to grow by over double in the next decade, reaching $18bn by 2030.  However, despite the positive growth the industry has had, this doesn’t mean Life Sciences will be free of challenges. In fact, with such a spike in the amount of data held by so many Life Science companies as they tried to work on a vaccine, data storage is now one of the main concerns for anyone working within the field.  In this article by Express Pharma, Vimal Venkatram, Country Manager for Snowflake India, highlights the five key data hurdles Life Sciences will continue to have to overcome in the following decade. These include data performance, data exchange and collaboration, data quality, data management and scaling, and regulatory compliance.  Read the full story here.  Harnham: How can organisations tap into the huge pool of neurodiverse data talent? For many companies, the past year has led to an increased focus on diversity and inclusion within businesses – a fantastic step forward. However, when we think of diversity, we usually assume people are talking about gender, ethnicity, sexuality and perhaps even physical disability. One area that is regularly missed from discussion is that of neurodiversity.  An umbrella term coined by sociologist, Judy Singer, neurodiversity can cover a wide range of neurological conditions such as dyslexia, autism, ADHD, ADD and dyspraxia. Our head of internal recruitment, Charlie Waterman, explores why neurodiverse talent shouldn’t be overlooked, and how Data & Analytics specifically can do more to tap into and harness this incredible pool of talent.` Exploring how employers can create a smooth recruitment process, successful onboarding programmes and retention schemes, this article highlights how all of this can be tailored to be accessible for anyone with an invisible disability. To read more on this topic, click here. Computer Weekly: What has a year of homeworking meant for the DPO? Employers in a significant number of industries across the world have had to uproot from the office to working from home because of the COVID-19 pandemic. For many of these employers, it appears that remote working, or a hybrid model of working, will become the norm post-pandemic.  But what has this sudden shift meant for the likes of Data Protection Officers (DPOs)? Most of these professionals have had to get to grips with managing and handling sensitive data from the comfort of their own living room. According to data from IBM, 70 per cent of DPOs believe that the shift to remote working will increase the likelihood of data breaches. So how can DPOs enjoy the benefits and perks of working from home, without the stress of poorly managed or breached data? In this article by Computer Weekly, steps are outlined on how DPOs can work closely with IT teams to minimise any data risk that could happen. This includes: Not allowing DPOs access to everything if it’s not necessaryDiscouraging local storage of dataRegularly reviewing security standards To read the full article, visit the website here.  Solutions Review: The three best Data Engineering books on our reading lists There’s no better feeling than getting stuck into a really good book. Not only can it be a great way to escape the stresses of everyday life, but by continuously absorbing new information, your knowledge on a specific subject can grow immensely.  Any branch of Data & Analytics, but especially Data Engineering, requires employees to always be thinking one step ahead, staying on top of new trends and keeping up to date with specific coding languages. While everyone learns in very different ways, reading is a brilliant education tool. Whether you’re a visual learner, an auditory learner or a reading learner, books and audiobooks could be the key to expanding your knowledge.  Solutions Review provides Data Engineers with three of the best books on the market at the moment to help you keep on top of your professional development. Data Driven Science and Engineering by Brunton and KutzData Engineering with Python by Crickard An introduction to agile Data Engineering by using data vault 2.0 by Graziano To read more about each of these books, click here.  We've loved seeing all the news from Data & Analytics in the past week, it’s a market full of exciting and dynamic opportunities. To learn more about our work in this space, get in touch with us at  info@harnham.com.    

How Can Organisations Tap Into The Huge Pool Of Neurodiverse Data Talent?

Ensuring that our workplaces are thriving with a diverse range of talent is, rightly, a topic that many organisations are focussing on. Yet, for the most part, this dialogue is centred around gender, ethnicity, sexuality and perhaps even physical disability. It is fairly uncommon therefore to see close attention given to exploring the challenges surrounding neurodiversity in organisations around the globe. Generally speaking, the term neurodiversity encompasses autism, attention deficit disorders, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and other neurological conditions. To hear a range of diverse viewpoints and perspectives is to contribute to an inclusive society and organisation. Leaving neurodiversity aside is no longer acceptable. Our research in the US highlights how 26 per cent of US adults have some form of disability, yet disabled individuals only account for 3.5 per cent of those working in Data & Analytics. As the global skills shortage worsens, it stands to reason that businesses will want to access this previously untapped talent pool. We know that in the UK, 56 per cent of organisations continue to experience skills shortages and in the US, two-thirds of employers hiring for full-time, permanent employees say they can’t find qualified talent to fill open jobs. An often-overlooked area of diversity is the impact a disability can have on an individual’s professional career. It’s no secret that all organisations would like to construct the best team – but are you doing enough to consider underrepresented talent? Creating a smooth recruitment and interview process One of the first barriers that neurodiverse candidates may encounter when seeking to enter an organisation is the recruitment and interview process. For these individuals, undergoing testing in this way puts pressure on communication skills, a tool that often allows us to better understand, connect and empathise with one another. When it comes to the recruitment process, the traditional in-person interview process — which assesses communication skills and personality fit — can be difficult to negotiate for neurodiverse candidates. In fact, this can be said to have been heightened by the pandemic too. The switch to virtual interviewing has added a new challenge to how neurodiverse candidates are able to participate in the process as miscommunication and interruptions come into the picture. For employers, tapping into the pool of data professionals with these invisible disabilities requires them to take the stress out of the interview and assessment process. It is critical to consider someone’s potential ability to do the job and the core skills that they have linking directly to the role on offer. Onboard a successful neurodiverse candidate efficiently Regardless of the size of an organisation, from global corporation to growing SME, they all share the same need to onboard new hires successfully and with limited disruption. It is this process that begins the relationship between an employee and an employer and although there will have been interactions through the recruitment process, it is the initial welcome into the organisation that will set the tone for the relationship moving forward. For neurodiverse employees this can be a daunting prospect; meeting new people while also familiarising themselves with a new environment and routine requires ongoing support and help from the employer. There are a number of ways that organisations can make this easier, from in-person or virtual meetings with smaller groups of the team to scheduled one-to-one chats with colleagues, the first few steps can be made more comfortable by promoting an inclusive culture. However, as there are such wide-ranging differences between neurodiverse conditions and individual requirements, employers need to implement policies that are tailored and highly individualised. Creating such policies and programmes can be complex and time-consuming, but it is critical to include your team in this. Ultimately it will boost your bottom line and the array of perspectives and views that are shared within the organisation. Retaining neurodiverse employees Neurodiverse candidates are capable, intelligent and have creative-thinking minds. To ensure their tenure within an organisation is lengthy and successful, we need to support these professionals and equip them with the tools and support they need to thrive. A standardised approach will not satisfy every need, and so it is important that every person in your organisation is accommodated as far as possible. The importance of this could not be clearer, as the BIMA Tech Inclusion & Diversity Report details how neurodivergent employees are more likely to be impacted by poor mental health (84 per cent against 49 per cent for neurotypical workers). This suggests that beyond attracting neurodiverse talent into the organisation, employers need to focus on the quality of the experience within the team. For example, take the time to book in regular meetings between the employee and their line manager. This will ensure that projects run smoothly, and any concerns or questions can be raised in a controlled environment. Listen to your team and their lived experiences to make informed and accurate plans to facilitate their growth within the team. After all, each employee brings a set of unique skills to a company. As more organisations realise the benefits of hiring neurodivergent candidates into their teams, employers have to act quickly to make routes into the business as accessible as possible. Ultimately, hiring neurodiverse people makes complete business sense. We know that diverse teams perform better, so now is the time to step up and tap into the huge pool of neurodiverse data talent. If you’re in the world of Data & Analytics and looking to take a step up or find the next member of your team, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.

Weekly News Digest: 5th - 9th April 2021

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Not only does Data Visualisation allow us to learn more effectively, but we can then turn this understanding into much broader and deeper Business Intelligence.  To read more on the positives of Data Visualisation and how to translate this into meaningful Business Intelligence, click here.  ZDNet: The five Vs of customer data platforms According to ZDNet, Customer Data Platforms (CDPs) are the hottest marketing technology today, offering companies a way to capture, unify, activate, and analyse customer data. Research done in 2020 by Salesforce showed that CDPs were among the highest priority investments for CMOs in 2021. If you’re planning to invest in a CDP this year, what five critical things do you need to think about when developing a successful strategy? ZDNet tells all.  Velocity - Your systems need to manage a high volume of data, coming in at various speeds.Variety - Every system has a slightly different main identifier or "source of truth," and the goal is to have one. This starts with being able to provision a universal information model, or schema, which can organize all of the differently labelled data into a common taxonomy. Veracity - Companies must ensure they can provision a single, persistent profile for every customer or account.Volume - It has been theorized that, in 2020, 1.7MB of data was created every second for every person on Earth. If you want to use those interactions to form the basis of your digital engagement strategy, you have to store them somewhere. Value - Once you have a clean, unified set of scaled data – now’s the time to think about how to derive value from it.  To learn more, read the full article here. Towards Data Science: How to Prepare for Business Case Interview Questions as a Data Scientist When you think of Data Science, the first thing that comes to mind will be technical knowledge of coding languages and fantastic statistical ability; softer skills such as communication and exceptional business knowledge may be overlooked. However, this is where many budding Data Scientists trip up. It is these softer skills and business acumen that sets brilliant candidates apart from others.  But how, when not usually taught at university, do you gather the business knowledge that will set you apart from the competition and showcase it in interview? Towards Data Science shares a few key pointers. Build a foundation – Brush up on your business basics. Research project management methodologies, organisational roles, tools, tech and metrics - all are crucial here. Company specifics – Research your company and its staff. Make sure your knowledge is tailored to the company you’re interviewing for. Products – This is where you’ll stand out above the rest if you get it right. The more you can know the ins and outs of products and metrics at the company, the more prepared you will be to answer business case questions. Read the full article here.  Harnham: Amped up Analytics: Google Analytics 4 Joshua Poore, one of our Senior Managers based in the US West division of Harnham, explores Google’s new and improved data insight capabilities, predominantly across consumer behaviours and preferences.  This exciting new feature of Google was born in the last quarter of 2020 and has now fully come into its infancy, and it’s an exciting time for Data & Analytics specialists across the globe. Joshua explores four key advantages of Google Analytics 4.0. Combined data and reporting - Rather than focusing on one property (web or app) at a time, this platform allows marketers to track a customer’s journey more holistically. A focus on anonymised data - By crafting a unified user journey centred around machine learning to fill in any gaps, marketers and businesses have a way to get the information they need without diving into personal data issues.Predictive metrics - Using Machine Learning to predict future transactions is a game changer for the platform. These predictive metrics for e-commerce sites on Google properties allow for targeted ads to visitors who seem most likely to make a purchase within one week of visiting the site. Machine Learning driven insights - GA4 explains it “has machine learning at its core to automatically surface helpful insights and gives you a complete understanding of your customers across devices and platforms.” Machine Learning-driven insights include details that elude human analysts.  To read Joshua’s full insights on GA4, click here.  We've loved seeing all the news from Data & Analytics in the past week, it’s a market full of exciting and dynamic opportunities. To learn more about our work in this space, get in touch with us at  info@harnham.com.   

How Are Life Science Analytics Innovating For A Post-Pandemic World?

As COVID-19 unfolded, the Life Science discipline was thrust into the spotlight. The pandemic has shown the extent of the Life Sciences industry’s ability to innovate and collaborate. When facing a new disease, Life Sciences adapted quickly. The rate at which pharmaceutical companies successfully developed COVID-19 vaccines was unprecedented. Approaches that may have previously been labelled risky, were implemented to manage changing demand and deliver increased throughput. Embracing digitisation and innovation enabled organisations to adapt and accept constant change. The pandemic has shown just how well the Life Science industry is able to innovate and develop according to changing demands. As the world looks to the future, how can Life Sciences continue to remain dynamic?  Cloud data The cloud is becoming a CEO agenda item for Life Sciences. The cloud has the potential to enable more effective and profitable ways of doing business throughout the life science industry. It offers a powerful, secure platform for innovation and collaboration, with immense transactional power and data throughput. The cloud is necessary for creating data enablement, ensuring the right data is in the right place at the right time. It enables companies to innovate faster, work at a greater scale and increase collaboration.  Virtual communication According to Accenture, sixty-one per cent of healthcare professionals now communicate more with pharmaceutical sale reps than before the pandemic. 87 per cent now want either purely virtual or a blend of in-person and virtual meetings post-pandemic.  New means of virtual communication have created new opportunities in the industry. Digitisation allows for increased communication with trial participants and new opportunities to educate people about their conditions and care. There was already a growing trend for virtual healthcare interactions, but the pandemic has shifted this is into becoming the new normal. Collaboration ecosystem COVID-19 has led to increasing collaboration between companies. The race for a vaccine has seen cooperation evolve at an extraordinary pace. Companies who usually compete are now coming together to share data and cooperate. Organisations have created collaborative agreements in a matter of weeks; partnerships that pre-pandemic would have taken years to create.  The industry is now seeing the value of ecosystem partnership. The success of organisations post-pandemic relies on this continued collaboration.  AI and blockchain technology COVID-19 has increased the focus on AI in Life Sciences. Yet, Life Sciences have only scratched the surface of AI capabilities. AI has the potential to transform the industry; it can design novel compounds, identify genetic targets, expedite drug development and improve supply chains. The use of AI in Life Sciences is expected to continue to grow and organisations will need to focus ever more on merging human knowledge and AI capabilities.  Blockchain is also becoming increasingly trusted in Life Sciences. Its ability to create tamper-proof records makes it a key resource in increasing patient trust in remote clinical trials. As more of the industry understands the skills needed to use blockchain and increases collaboration, blockchain has the potential to become ubiquitous in Life Sciences. The pandemic has shown the importance of digital technology in Life Sciences. Digitisation increases efficiency and, collaboration, and also helps create a framework for future scientific discoveries. As we look towards a post-pandemic world, a successful Life Science industry must continue to embrace this mindset of innovation, collaboration and dynamism.  If you’re in the world of Data & Analytics and looking to take a step up or find the next member of your team, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.

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