Privacy Notice



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Harnham Search and Selection 
Privacy Notice
1. General
1.1 Harnham Search and Selection Limited together with its group companies (“we”, “us” or “Harnham”) take the privacy of your information very seriously. This Privacy Notice is designed to tell you about our practices regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information which may be collected in person from you, obtained via our websites or collected through other means such as by an online form, email, or telephone communication.
1.2 This notice applies to personal information provided by our clients and suppliers about their employees and other individuals affiliated with them and also to candidates or prospective candidates (“Candidates”) whose data we process for proposed roles with our clients or prospective clients. Where a given role with our client is to be filled by a limited company or other corporate contractor we may process data relating to that company’s directors or shareholders and in this policy a “Candidate” may include directors and shareholders of corporate contractors. 
1.3 In this notice “you” refers to any individual whose personal data we hold or process (i.e: an individual candidate or potential candidate, an individual affiliated with a corporate contractor candidate, or an individual or employee associated or affiliated with our client or supplier.
1.4 In general, our services are related to the provision of recruitment services to clients and we do not process personal data on a large scale, but we will hold certain data in relation to Candidates and individuals affiliated with our clients and suppliers, and this notice sets out the basis on which we hold that data.
1.5 This notice is governed by the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) from 25 May 2018.
2. Legal Basis on which we process personal data
2.1 Personal data we hold about you will be processed either because:
2.1.1 the processing is necessary in order for us to comply with our obligations under a contract between you and us, specifically for the provision of our services; or
2.1.2 the processing is necessary in pursuit of a “legitimate interest”, a legitimate interest in this context means a valid interest we have or a third party has in processing your personal data which is not overridden by your interests in data privacy and security
2.1.3 for certain ‘special categories’ of sensitive personal data including data relating to health and ethnic background which we may process from time to time we will process this data on the basis of your consent.

Harnham Search and Selection

Privacy Notice

1. General

1.1 Harnham Search and Selection Limited together with its group companies (“we”, “us” or “Harnham”) take the privacy of your information very seriously. This Privacy Notice is designed to tell you about our practices regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information which may be collected in person from you, obtained via our websites or collected through other means such as by an online form, email, or telephone communication.

1.2 This notice applies to personal information provided by our clients and suppliers about their employees and other individuals affiliated with them and also to candidates or prospective candidates (“Candidates”) whose data we process for proposed roles with our clients or prospective clients. Where a given role with our client is to be filled by a limited company or other corporate contractor we may process data relating to that company’s directors or shareholders and in this policy a “Candidate” may include directors and shareholders of corporate contractors.

1.3 In this notice “you” refers to any individual whose personal data we hold or process (i.e: an individual candidate or potential candidate, an individual affiliated with a corporate contractor candidate, or an individual or employee associated or affiliated with our client or supplier.

1.4 In general, our services are related to the provision of recruitment services to clients and we do not process personal data on a large scale, but we will hold certain data in relation to Candidates and individuals affiliated with our clients and suppliers, and this notice sets out the basis on which we hold that data.

1.5 This notice is governed by the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) from 25 May 2018.

2. Legal Basis on which we process personal data

2.1 Personal data we hold about you will be processed either because:

2.1.1 the processing is necessary in order for us to comply with our obligations under a contract between you and us, specifically for the provision of our services; or

2.1.2 the processing is necessary in pursuit of a “legitimate interest”, a legitimate interest in this context means a valid interest we have or a third party has in processing your personal data which is not overridden by your interests in data privacy and security

2.1.3 for certain ‘special categories’ of sensitive personal data including data relating to health and ethnic background which we may process from time to time we will process this data on the basis of your consent.

3. Personal data we collect

3.1 We may collect and process the following personal data (information that can be uniquely identified with you) about you:

3.1.1 for individuals associated with our clients we may hold contact information such as names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Client Contact Information”);

3.1.2 for individuals associated with our suppliers and other third parties we interact with we may hold contact information such as names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Third Party Contact Information”);

3.1.3 for Candidates we may have personal information about you, your background, work history etc. This information may include name, address, telephone number, email address, CV, work history, educational qualifications (“Candidate Information”);

3.1.4 a record of any correspondence or communication between you and us (“Communication Information”);

3.1.5 marketing information we may hold about you in order to provide information about our services this may include names, email addresses, phone numbers, addresses, and job titles and/or specific roles within your organisation (“Marketing Information”).

3.2 We will collect information either from you directly or from a third party (for instance your employer or an introducer). If we do obtain your personal data from a third party your privacy rights under this notice are not affected and you are still able to exercise the rights contained within this notice.

3.3 Although you do not have to supply any personal information to us in practice we may be unable to provide our services to you without personal data (for instance we will need contact information in order to communicate with you). You may withdraw our authority to process your personal data (or request that we restrict our processing) at any time but there are circumstances in which we may need to continue to process personal data (please see below).

4. How we process your personal data 

4.1 Please see the table below, which sets out the manner in which we will process the different types of personal data we hold:

Purpose/Activity

Type of data

Lawful basis for processing including basis of legitimate interest

When we are setting up a retainer or engagement with a client or potential client with whom you are associated or entering into an agreement to provide services to our client.


Client Contact Information

Communication Information

Performance of a contract


Necessary for our legitimate interests (to establish necessary information about you in order to provide our services)


When we research, locate and record information relating to Candidates.


Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver recruitment services to our clients in the interests of the clients and Candidates).


When we provide information relating to Candidates to our clients or potential clients.


Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients in the interests of the clients and Candidates).


When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our client or potential client in order to provide our services to you.

Client Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract


Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients).


When we communicate with you as a Candidate or an individual associated with our Candidate in the context of a given role or type role.


Candidate Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract


Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients in the interests of clients and Candidates).


When we store information relating to Candidates in order to put Candidates forward for potential roles in the future.


Candidate Information

Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients in the interests of the clients and  Candidates).


When we enter into an agreement with you or an organisation with which you are connected as a supplier.


Third Party Contact Information

Communication Information.

Performance of a contract with you


Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services).


When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our supplier or another third party we interact with.

Third Party Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract with you


Necessary for our legitimate interests (in order to deliver our services to our clients).


When we communicate with you as an individual affiliated with our client, potential client about our services (for instance if you request assistance).

Client Contact Information

Communication Information

 

Performance of a contract with you


Necessary for our legitimate interests (for running our business and to provide our clients with our services)


To manage our relationship with you as our client, supplier or third party.


 

Client Contact Information

Third Party Contact Information


Communication Information


 

Performance of a contract with you.


Necessary to comply with a legal obligation.


Necessary for our legitimate interests in ensuring that we maintain good relationships with our clients, suppliers and third parties.


To store your contact information for marketing purposes and sending marketing and other promotional communications to you.


Client Contact Information


Candidate Information


Marketing Information


 

Necessary for our legitimate interests in promoting our services to business customers or Clients, or consumers with consent or because the relevant individual has purchased similar services from us.


 

For each type of data listed above, definitions are included under clause 3.1.

5.1 Data Retention

Our current data retention policy is to delete or destroy (to the extent we are able to) the personal data we hold about you in accordance with the following:

Category of personal data

Length of retention

Records relevant for tax authorities

8 years from the end of the year to which the records relate

Candidate Data

The later of 7 years from placing a Candidate in a given role with our client, or in the case of contractors, 7 years from the end of the role with our client, or 7 years from the last date on which you have interacted with us.

Candidate Data where we have researched and located Candidate Data without direct interaction

1 year from date of data collection

Personal data processed in relation to a contract between you and us

7 years from either the end of the contract or the date you last used our services, being the length of time following a breach of contract in which you are entitled to make a legal claim.

Personal data held on marketing or business development records

3 years from the last date on which you have interacted with us.

 

5.2 For any category of personal data not specifically defined in this notice, and unless otherwise specified by applicable law, the required retention period for any personal data will be deemed to be 7 years from the date of receipt by us of that data.

5.3 The retention periods stated in this notice can be prolonged or shortened as may be required (for example, in the event that legal proceedings apply to the data or if there is an on-going investigation into the data).

5.4 We review the personal data (and the categories of personal data) we are holding on a regular basis to ensure the data we are holding is still relevant to our business and is accurate. If we discover that certain data we are holding is no longer necessary or accurate, we will take reasonable steps to correct or delete this data as may be required.

5.5 If you wish to request that data we hold about you is amended or deleted, please refer to clause 8 below, which explains your privacy rights.

6. Sharing your information

6.1 We do not disclose any information you provide to any third parties other than as follows:

6.1.1 We will disclose Candidate Data to our clients or potential clients and our clients will be the data controller for that Candidate Data;

6.1.2 We may disclose information to our group companies;

6.1.3 if we are under a duty to disclose or share your personal data in order to comply with any legal obligation (for example, if required to do so by a court order or for the purposes of prevention of fraud or other crime);

6.1.4 in order to enforce any terms and conditions or agreements for our services that may apply;

6.1.5 if we are sub-contracting services to a third party we may provide information to that third party in order to provide the relevant services;

6.1.6 we may transfer your personal information to a third party as part of a sale of some or all of our business and assets to any third party or as part of any business restructuring or reorganisation, but we will take steps with the aim of ensuring that your privacy rights continue to be protected;

6.1.7 to protect our rights, property and safety, or the rights, property and safety of our users or any other third parties. This includes exchanging information with other companies and organisations for the purposes of fraud protection and credit risk reduction.

6.2 Other than as set out above, we shall not disclose any of your personal information unless you give us permission to do so. If we do supply your personal information to a third party we will take steps to ensure that your privacy rights are protected and that third party complies with the terms of this notice.

7. Security

7.1 We will take all reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate technical and organisational measures are carried out in order to safeguard the information we collect from you and protect against unlawful access and accidental loss or damage. These measures may include (as necessary):

7.1.1 protecting our servers with software firewalls;

7.1.2 locating our data processing storage facilities in secure locations;

7.1.3 encrypting all data stored on our server with an industry standard encryption method that encrypts the data between your computer and our server so that in the event of your network being insecure no data is passed in a format that could easily be deciphered;

7.1.4 when necessary, disposing of or deleting your data so it is done so securely;

7.1.5 regularly backing up all data we hold.

7.2 We will ensure that our employees are aware of their privacy and data security obligations. We will take reasonable steps to ensure that the employees of third parties working on our behalf are aware of their privacy and data security obligations.

7.3 This notice and our procedures for handling personal data will be reviewed as necessary.

7.4 Unfortunately, the transmission of information via the internet is not completely secure. Although we will do our best to protect your personal data, we cannot guarantee the security of your data transmitted to the Site; any transmission is at your own risk. Once we have received your information, we will use the strict procedures and security features referred to in this clause to try to prevent unauthorised access.

8. Your privacy rights

8.1 The GDPR gives you the following rights in respect of personal data we hold about you:

The right to be informed

You have a right to know about our personal data protection and data processing activities, details of which are contained in this notice.

The right of access

You can make what is known as a Subject Access Request (“SAR”) to request information about the personal data we hold about you (free of charge, save for reasonable expenses for repeat requests). If you wish to make a SAR please contact us as described below.

The right to correction

Please inform us if information we hold about you is incomplete or inaccurate in any way and we will update our records as soon as possible, but in any event within one month.

We will take reasonable steps to communicate the change to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

The right to erasure (the ‘right to be forgotten’)

Please notify us if you no longer wish us to hold personal data about you (although in practice it is not possible to provide our services without holding your personal data and we may need to keep your data in some circumstances). Unless we have reasonable grounds to refuse the erasure, on receipt of such a request we will securely delete the personal data in question within one month. The data may continue to exist in certain backup, but we will take steps to ensure that it will not be accessible.

We will communicate the erasure to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

The right to restrict processing

You can request that we no longer process your personal data in certain ways, whilst not requiring us to delete the same data. However again, some of our Services will not be available if processing is restricted.

The right to data portability

You have right to receive copies of personal data we hold about you in a commonly used and easily storable format (please let us know a format which suits you). You may also request that we transfer your personal data directly to a third party (where technically possible).

The right to object

Unless we have overriding legitimate grounds for such processing, you may object to us using your personal data for direct marketing purposes (including profiling) or for research or statistical purposes. Please notify your objection to us and we will gladly cease such processing.

Rights with respect to automated decision-making and profiling

You have a right not to be subject to automated decision-making (including profiling) when those decisions have a legal (or similarly significant effect) on you. You are not entitled to this right when the automated processing is necessary for us to perform our obligations under a contract with you, it is permitted by law, or if you have given your explicit consent.

Right to withdraw consent

If we are relying on your consent as the basis on which we are processing your personal data, you have the right to withdraw your consent at any time. Even if you have not expressly given your consent to our processing, you also have the right to object (see above).

 

8.2 All SARs and other requests or notifications in respect of your above rights must be sent to us in writing to Harnham Search and Selection Limited 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon SW19 7QW, dataprotection@harnham.com

8.3 We will endeavour to comply with such requests as soon as possible but in any event we will comply within one month of receipt (unless a longer period of time to respond is reasonable by virtue of the complexity or number of your requests).

9. Data Breaches

9.1 If personal data we hold about you is subject to a breach or unauthorised disclosure or access, we will report this to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and/or our data protection manager.

9.2 If a breach is likely to result in a risk to your data rights and freedoms, we will notify you as soon as possible.

10. Transferring your information outside Europe

10.1 As part of the services provided to our clients offered to you the information you provide to us may be transferred to, processed and stored at, countries or international organisations outside of the EEA.

10.2 Our client may be based outside of the EEA and we may transfer personal data to our client outside of the EEA. For instance we may transfer Candidate Information to our client outside of the EEA where this is necessary to perform a contract between us and the client and this is in the interests of the Candidate.

10.3 Data may be processed by our group companies based outside of the EEA, but we will ensure that any data accessible by our group companies will be subject to a data transfer agreement or binding corporate rules to maintain your rights as a data subject.

10.4 If you contact us while you are outside the EEA, your information may be transferred outside the EEA in order to communicate with you.

10.5 If we transfer your information outside of the EEA other than in accordance with this clause and the third country or international organisation in question has not been deemed by the EU Commission to have adequate data protection laws, we will provide appropriate safeguards and we will be responsible for ensuring your privacy rights continue to be protected as outlined in this notice.

11. Notification of changes to the contents of this notice

We will post details of any changes to our policy on www.harnham.com to help ensure you are always aware of the information we collect, how we use it, and in what circumstances, if any, we share it with other parties.

12. Contact us

If at any time you would like to contact us with your views about our privacy practices, or with any enquiry or complaint relating to your personal information or how it is handled, you can do so via the following address: Harnham Search and Selection Limited, 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon SW19 7QW, dataprotection@harnham.com

If we are unable to resolve any issues you may have or you would like to make a further complaint, you can contact the Information Commissioner’s Office by visiting http://www.ico.org.uk/ for further assistance.


Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

A Q&A With Dyson’s Data Governance CDO

Mridul Mathur is a skilled Senior Program Director with more than 15 years of experience working in businesses from Deutschebak to Dyson. He has a proven track record of successfully delivering large and complex cross-functional programs and building high performing teams from scratch. In last five years the main focus of his work has been in the area of Data Management to address the issues and challenges organisations have faced in the wake of various new regulations. Data Management and Data Governance are hot topics at the moment. Do you feel that attitudes have changed towards the fields since the beginning of your career? It’s been a very big shift. Going back to my involvement at Deutsche Bank around 2007, we were managing Data purely because we needed to create a Credit Risk position so that we could explain to the Bank of England and other regulators what we were doing. We didn’t really look beyond that.  But now, if you look at the industry, we want to use Data to not only calculate our Risk position but to derive value out of that Data.  It's something that can give a company a competitive advantage  one of those things that can significantly change a business. I personally feel that the turning point, not just for Deutsche Bank but for everybody was the market crash that happened in 2008.  A lot of the company did not have Data Management skills, or the ability to bring the Data together to understand exposures. Those who had exposure against Lehman, for example, could not recover any of the money they lost. That was the big turning point for all of them, when they actually lost hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of revenue and loans overnight. They didn’t have the right Data, in the right place, and it cost them. What major issues do you see successful Data Governance facing over the next 12 months? I think we're still going through a phase of understanding and internalizing the issue. By that I mean that we understand that our Data is important and how it can help us not only manage Risk but create value. But, when it comes to actually applying it, we are hamstrung by two things:  One is that we haven't quite grasped the ways in which we can internalise that Data. We understand the value but the actual application is not really out there currently. Secondly, I think that in some places, we have too much activity. I've been in places where there have been competing Data agendas and competing Data Governance ideas. When people are not taking their organisational view and just looking to get ahead, it’s hard to achieve any real success.  If you were advising a company about to commence on a large Data Management transformation project, what advice would you give them? This links to the previous point really, and it’s a bigger issue in large companies. You need to have a business approach to Data Governance, as well as the IP capabilities to deal with a project of that scale. And what you find sometimes is that multiple groups get together and they each have a different view of what good looks like. They end up not communicating throughout the organisation and properly aligning everybody’s roles and responsibilities. These different agendas then end up causing issues because everyone has a different idea of what they want.  We need to be able to plan across the organization to get the right agenda and get the right properties in place. Then you can start the work, as opposed to each team just working where they think the biggest problem lies first.  What would you say are the biggest threats to a successful Data Management program? Obviously the above is one, but it leads to another which is really the lack of Senior Management sponsorship. If you don’t get the right level of sponsorship, then you don’t get the mandate to do what you need. This can cause huge delays and is definitely one of the biggest threats to your program being a success.  In finance, you worked within a highly regulated industry. How have your approaches changed now that you’re in a highly innovative, tech-driven environment? The approach is different. We do have challenges that others don't, but over and above, because we innovate and create things, there is an abundance of new information. Information protection and intellectual property protection is therefore at the top of the agenda. That drives the need for effective Data Governance and it really has to be at the forefront of the approach.  Data breaches have caused widespread reputational damage to companies such as Facebook and Yahoo. Have you found that companies now view Data protection as central to their commercial performance? Absolutely. People realize that they not only need Data to do their business, but they also need to protect that Data. These breaches have resulted in a greater importance being given to this function and every year I see it moving closer to the center of the organisation. There are very few large organisations left that haven’t recognized Data Protection as one of their formal functions. A lot of companies are now looking to build out their Data Protection teams from the ground up, starting with lower levels of analysts, but also management as well. It’s becoming a much greater priority and these big breaches are one of the driving factors.  What do you feel will be the most effective technical advancement within Data Management in 2019? I think, from a technological perspective, we still have some way to go with digital rights management. There’s now one or two solutions that are supposed to be at Enterprise level, but they’re not enough and they’re still not joining the digital rights management side of things with the Big Data Loss Prevention side.  So companies are having to rely on seeing this together with a combination of plugin software and various tools and technology. It’s sticking around the edges of the edges of a fix, but it’s not actually doing the job. I'd like to see these technologies develop because I think we're crying for some help in this area.  What is the biggest risk to their Data that businesses should be aware of? Not knowing where to get hold of Data. It is just mind boggling to me, that there has not been a single company that I have been a part of where we started a program and we knew where to get all our Data from. Obviously we knew where most of it was,  but we didn’t know where else it was and that what we were looking at was a comprehensive set of maps. It just continues to be the same at every business I have worked at.   What role does data governance have to play in protecting a business’ intellectual property? It plays a huge role. Firstly, a company needs to be very clear on their Data policies. This means regularly training teams on the importance of this, much like you would with health and safety. By clearly defining and educating people on the dos and don’ts of data handling you can better protect your intellectual property. I think getting the policy framework right and implementing it using digital rights management is crucial and good Data Governance relies on this.  When hiring for your teams, which traits or skills do you look for in candidates? There are two key parts; one is technical and the other non-technical. In my mind, it’s less about the technical because, ultimately, I just want someone who knows how to use ‘technology x’. They need to be able to make use of Data from a database, or be able to spot Data in an unstructured environment. But, for me, the most important skill is more of a characteristic: tenacity. I use the word tenacity because you have to put yourself out there. You have to ask people questions and you have to educate them. You can’t assume that people just understand Data you’re presenting them and you have to become their friends and learn to speak their language. It also really brings in the skill of being able to work with teams and across teams. Being a team player would absolutely be top of my list. Mridul spoke to Femi Akintoye, a Recruitment Consultant in our Data & Technology function. Take a look at our latest roles or get in touch with Femi.

How To Attract Data Scientists To Your Business (And How Not To)

Whilst the role of Data Scientist is still considered one of the most desirable around, many businesses are finding that a shortage of strong, experienced talent is preventing them from growing their teams sufficiently. With a huge demand for such a small talent base, enterprises have begun to ask what they can do to ensure that they can secure the skillsets they need.  If you’re looking at hiring a Data Scientist, there are a few key Do’s and Don’ts that you need to bear in mind: THE DO’S Create A Clear Career Path In most companies, a career path is defined. Usually you grow from junior to senior to manager etc. However, Data Scientists often like to become experts rather than moving up the traditional career ladder into people management roles. And, once a Data Scientists becomes an expert, they want to remain an expert. To do this, they need to keep up with the latest tools and data systems and continually improve. That’s why it’s important that you put in place a clear career path that suits the Data Scientists. In addition to the possibility of leading teams on projects, businesses should provide opportunities for financial progression that reflect growing skillsets in addition to increased responsibilities.  Let Them Be Inventive One of the biggest turn-offs for Data Scientists is lack of opportunities to try new techniques and technologies. Data Scientists can get bored easily if their tasks are not challenging enough. They want to work on a company’s most important and challenging functions and feel as though they are making an impact. If they are asked to spend their time on performing the same tasks all the time, they often feel under-utilised. Providing forward-looking projects, with innovative technologies, gives Data Scientists the opportunity to reinvent the way the company benefits from their Data. Provide Opportunities To Discover  As part of their attitude of constant improvement, Data Scientists often feel that attending conferences or meet-ups helps them become better at their role. Not only are these a chance for them to meet with their peers and exchange their Data Science knowledge, they can also discover new algorithms and methodologies that could be of benefit to your business. Businesses that allow the time and budget for their team to attend these are seen as much more attractive prospects for potential employees in a competitive market.  Give them the freedom they need Data Scientists are efficient workers who can both collaborate and work independently. Because of this, they expect their employers to trust that they will get the job done without feeling micro-managed. By offering flexible working, be it flexi-hours or working from home options, enterprises can make themselves a much more appealing place to work.  THE DON’TS Hire The Wrong Skillset As many companies begin to introduce Data teams into their business, they can often attempt to hire for the wrong job. Generally, this will be because they automatically jump to wanting to hire a Data Scientist, but actually need a different role placed first. For example; a company may be looking to hire a Machine Learning specialist, but their data pipeline hasn't even been built yet. There are many talented candidates out there who want to work with the latest technology and solve problems in complex ways. But the reality is that a lot of businesses aren’t ready for their capabilities yet. Before hiring, asses what skillsets you really need and be specific in your search.  Undervalue Their Capabilities  There are still a large number of organisations that do not value Data within their culture and Data professionals pick up on this incredibly quickly. If they feel that their work is under appreciated, and they know that there is high demand for what they do, they will not waste their time sticking around. Ask yourself how you see your Data team contributing to the company as a whole and make this clear within your organisation. Advanced Data Scientists don't want to work on dashboarding so make sure that their work will have an impact and explain how you see this happening during the interview process. Additionally, be aware of other financial implications that their hire may have. It’s likely that they’ll need a supporting Data Engineer to work with and, if they don’t have access to one, they have another reason to look elsewhere.  The Data Scientist market is a candidate-driven one and, as a result of this, businesses need to go the extra mile to ensure they get the best talent around. By offering a strong set of benefits, the opportunity to grow and progress, and an environment that values Data, enterprises can stand out amongst the crowd and attract the best Data Scientists on the market.  If you’re looking for support with your Data Science hiring process, get in touch with one of our expert consultants who will be able to advise you on the best way forward. 

Using Data & Analytics To Plan Your Perfect Ski Trip

The Ski season may be drawing to a close, but it’s never too early to start planning for next year. Born and raised in the mountains of Austria, I have been skiing all of my life. For me, it’s about freedom, enjoying the views and forgetting about everything else.  But, since I’ve stepped into the world of Data & Analytics, I started to asked myself “what can I learn from my work that I can apply to my skiing”? After having a look around, I began to discover ways in which Data could support my passion. I’ve pulled together some of the most interesting things I’ve discovered and created this handy guide to help you prepare for your next trip. Here’s how you can use data to create the perfect ski trip.  Follow the snow Anyone who has skied before knows about the uncertainty before a trip. Will there be enough snow? Will the weather be good? Which resort is the most suited to my ability? Fortunately, somebody has already pulled this information together for you. Two "web spiders" were built via Scrapy, a Python framework used for data extraction, the first of which extracted ski resort data. The second spider, on the other hand, extracted daily snowfall data for each resort (2009 - present). After collecting Data from more than 600 ski resorts and spitting it into 7 main regions, the spiders were able to form a conclusion. The framework then pulled out key metrics, including the difficulty of runs, meaning that skiers are now able to decide which resort is most suitable for their ability.  As for the weather, onthesnow.com has recorded snowfall data from all major resorts, every year since 2009. We all know that good snow makes any trip better, so the collected data here will help skiers ensure they are prepared for the right weather, or even plan their trip around where the snow will be best.  Optimise your skis Ski manufacturing is a refined and complicated process, with each ski requiring many different materials to be built. Unfortunately, this often results in the best skis running out quickly as supply outspeeds demand.  To help speed up and improve the process, companies are implementing technologies like IBM Cognos* that monitor entire supply chains so that no matter how much demand increases, they have the materials to meet it.   Additionally, since the majority of companies have become more data-driven, production time has been reduced by weeks. Predictions for future demand has also become 50% more accurate, resulting in a drop of 30% idle time on production lines. Skip the Queue Tired of queuing for the ski lift? There’s good news. As they begin to make the most of data, ski resorts are introducing RFID* (Radio Frequency Identification) systems. These involve visitors purchasing cards with RFID chips included, allowing them to skip queues at the lifts as there is no need to check for fake passes. The data can then be utilised for gamification platforms to turn a skier’s time on the slopes into an interactive experience.  The shift towards Big Data not only has advantages for the visitors, but the management are also benefiting. In the past, it has been difficult to analyse skier’s data. Now, with automated and proper data management, the numbers can be crunched seamlessly and marketing campaigns can be directed at how people actually choose to ski.   Carve a Better Technique Skiing isn’t always easy, especially if you haven’t grown up with it. Usually, ski instructors are the solution but, in the age of Data & Analytics, there are other solutions. Jamie Grant and co-founder Pruthvikar Reddy have created an app called Carv 2.0, which allows you to be your own teacher. It works by using a robust insert that fits between the shell of your ski boots and the liner. It then gathers data from 48 pressure sensitive pads, and nine motion sensors.  This data is fed to a connected match-box size tracker unit, sitting on the back of your boots, before being relayed via Bluetooth to the Carv App on your phone. Carv can then measure your speed, acceleration and ski orientation a staggering 300 times a second.  Thanks to a complex set of algorithms this data is then converted into an easy to follow graphic display on your phone’s screen as well as verbal feedback from Carvella. The accuracy of this real-time data could make it a better instructor than any individual person.  Data & Analytics are helping streamline every part of our lives. Whilst the above can’t guarantee a perfect ski trip, they can help us minimise risks and optimize our performance and experience.  If you’re able to use data to improve day-to-day living, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with our expert consultants.  

Our Top Five Tips For Your Data Scientist Interview

The role of Data Scientist is one of the most in-demand jobs in the tech world now. But, given that it is still a relatively new job, in a relatively new field, a lot of companies are still struggling to source enough quality candidates for their team. Despite the demand, tech companies are very specific about the candidates they’d like to hire. Passing a Data Science interview can be very tricky, especially considering that businesses are looking for the right technical knowledge, business sense, and culture fit.  With this in mind, here are five key tips for the Data Science interviewing process. By making sure you are prepared for the below, you’ll be able to ensure that you don’t sell yourself short. Have A Concise Overview Of Your Project Experience It’s imperative you prepare an overview of your successful Data Science projects. Hiring Managers aren’t interested in getting into every detail of your completed projects, but they do want to know that you have the right experience. Focus on key factors, highlighting the types of projects you’ve been working on and the successes you had as a result of those projects. Keep your achievements clear and concise. Show Your Communication Skills A good Data Scientist is more than just a good programmer. You need to be able to show that you can translate your findings into insights that can be understood by non-technical people in the business. During your interview, Hiring Managers may test your ability to step away from role-specific language. This is to asses whether you know how to engage with non-technical colleagues and parts of the business who may not understand the value of Data Science to the company. Bring Out Your USPs Companies will potentially be interviewing several candidates for a specific role, so it’s important that you are able to stand out. Consider what you have achieved that your fellow interviewees may not have. One good way to stand out is to have articles published on popular Data Science websites/blogs. From my experience, Hiring Managers see this as a big plus and it makes for a great talking point during the interview process. If you are looking to do this, you should always choose a unique topic and not something that is already explored a lot by others. On a similar note, you could highlight the Data Science projects you’ve achieved outside of work through platforms such as Kaggle.Know Your Computer Science Fundamentals Having a decent knowledge of Computer Science fundamentals, like algorithms is essential, especially if you are interviewing with tech companies. Whilst there are other elements to the role, you can expect questions related to programming, so for a Junior Data Scientist, I’d recommend practicing coding for a few days before your interview (if you are not doing this already in your day to day job). Have An Understanding Of How You’ll Fit In At The Company For some Tech companies, particularly start-ups, cultural fit is just as important, if not more so, than how good you are at coding. They’ll want to understand how you would react to different scenarios at work and whether or not you share the values of their company. For this reason, don’t be surprised to see a few team members join the interview as they look to see how you’ll fit in. Make sure you take a look at the company’s website, read their blogs and articles, and check their social media feeds in advance so that you have a good understanding of what the business is like. Remember, culture is a two-way fit so it’s about making sure the business is right for you, as much as it is right for them. The interviewing process can be tricky but, at Harnham, our expert consultants are here to support you through the entire recruitment process. We will always make sure you are prepared for your interview and will run you though the topics you can expect to come up. If you’re looking to take the next step in your Data & Analytics career, take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more. 

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