The Value of the Customer Experience

Customer Experience


Customer experience is a term that we hear almost every time we engage with a business now. Businesses care what we think about them as customers and it’s easy to understand why. Statistics show that 89% of consumers began doing business with a competitor following a poor customer experience. (Source: RightNow Customer Experience Impact Report 2011).

So looking after a customer is right up there as a top priority for so many of the UK’s major organizations when trading with customers, but why not when recruiting?



The Customer Experience and it's effects


So, what can you do? First, review your application processes

Avoid long delays

One sided processes

Be clear on a process, and stick to it



The Customer Experience and it's effects

When someone applies for a role with your business, should they be treated in the same way as someone interacting with your business as a customer?  We believe they are a potential customer and their experience will impact their opinion of your organization, and also whether they would like to join you.  Its key to realize that getting this wrong in a niche market is potentially very damaging.

Statistics seem to differ on the figures of how many people we tell if we have a good experience or bad experience, but it is safe to say that we tell more people about the bad experiences we have. If you’re recruiting in a niche market such as Data and Analytics, this can reduce your target market substantially in an already challenging and candidate driven market place.

So, what can you do? First, review your application processes

Avoid having processes that make candidates feel like a number. Although we appreciate that this is not always achievable on mass volume campaigns, you can still make the process as personable and welcoming as possible, just by reviewing the tone your ‘no thanks’ email response is written in. If a candidate is asked to fill in a long application form, answer questions and then do tests as a very first stage, what should they expect as a response? It is quite common for them to just receive an e-mail along the lines of “Thank you for your interest, but due to the large amount of applications, we are unable to give you further feedback.” Just by offering feedback, while it is still not the news they want to hear, will give them a much more positive impression of your organization.

Avoid long delays

Whilst we appreciate that sometimes there are delays in a recruitment process, it is important to give interviewees regular updates. Consider if someone attends an interview and goes through the effort of preparing for what can sometimes be a grueling meeting, they are going to be keen to hear if they have been successful. If they then have weeks of radio silence following the interview, it can mean that even if the outcome is positive, the candidate is frustrated by this stage.

One sided processes

Case studies and tests are a common part of an interview process, but candidates will take time off work to come in and complete them. Try to avoid this part of the process appearing like you are not interested in the personality of the candidate or that this is purely a one-sided assessment by giving them an opportunity first to talk about the business and why they have applied, and also giving you an opportunity to sell the business to them.

Be clear on a process, and stick to it

The key advice is to imagine yourself in a candidate’s shoes. You’ve looked for a job before, so you will know what makes a good and bad experience from your own personal experience. Each person who attends an interview is meeting you to discuss an aspect of their life that they will spend over 8 hours a day focusing on. If the process to secure the role isn’t good and doesn’t engender a positive view of your business then you could well be fighting a losing battle to hire them from the start.

 



<< By David Farmer >>

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