Terms



Site Terms/ Cookie Policy / Privacy Policy


Site Terms

Access to and use of the Harnham website is subject to the following terms and conditions.

Copyright

Copyright ©  Harnham 2013. All rights reserved. All copy and other intellectual property rights in all text, images, sounds, software and other materials on this site are owned by Harnham, or are included with permission of the relevant owner.

You are permitted to browse this site and to reproduce extracts by way of printing, downloading to a hard disk and by distribution to other people but in all cases, for non-commercial, informational and personal purposes only. No reproduction of any part of this site may be sold or distributed for commercial gain, nor shall it be modified or incorporated in any other work, publication or site. No other licence or right is granted.

Trademarks

All trademarks displayed on this site are either owned or used under licence by Harnham.

Contents

The information on this site has been included in good faith but is for general informational purposes only. It should not be relied on for any specific purpose and no representation or warranty is given as regards its accuracy, completeness or fitness for any particular purpose. Save to the extent that such limitation is not permitted under English Law Harnham, nor any of it's employees shall be liable for any loss, damage or expense arising in contract, tort or otherwise out of any reliance on information contained in this site, access to or use of or inability to use this site or any site linked to it including, without limitation, any loss of profit, indirect, incidental or consequential loss.

Use

Your information and activity on this site must not:

  • be false, inaccurate or misleading
  • be in breach of any applicable laws, regulations, licences, or third party rights
  • interfere in any way with the proper working of this site, and in particular you must not circumvent security, tamper with, hack into or disrupt the operation of the site or surreptitiously intercept, access without authority or expropriate any system, date or personal information as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998.

This site is intended normally to be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
You agree to fully reimburse Harnham in respect of all losses, costs, actions, claims, and liabilities incurred by Harnham as a result of any breach or non-observance by you of these terms or any data submitted by you to us.

Harnham will make all reasonable attempts to exclude viruses (and similar destructive devices) from the site but cannot guarantee the exclusion of viruses (and similar destructive devices), and you should take appropriate steps in respect of this risk.

Linked sites

At various points throughout the site, you may be offered automatic links to other internet sites relevant to a particular aspect of this site. This does not indicate that Harnham are necessarily associated with any of these other sites or their owners. While it is the intention of Harnham that you should find these other sites of interest, neither Harnham nor their employees shall have any responsibility or liability of any nature for these other sites or information contained in them.

These terms shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law and each party to these terms submits to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English Courts.

Company Registration Number: 05723485. Registered Address: 1st Floor, Ashville House, 131-139 The Broadway, Wimbledon, London, SW19 1QJ. Registered by Companies House, Cardiff.



Cookie Policy

If you are uncertain about what a cookie is have a look at our simple guide to find out how we use them on our website.

What is a cookie?

Cookies are text files containing small amounts of information which are downloaded to your device when you visit a website. Cookies are then sent back to the originating website on each subsequent visit, or to another website that recognizes that cookie.

Cookies do lots of different jobs, like letting you navigate between pages efficiently remembering your preferences, and generally improve your web site experience. They can also help to ensure that adverts you see online are more relevant to you and your interests.

We can split cookies into 4 main categories:

  • Category 1: strictly necessary cookies
  • Category 2: performance cookies
  • Category 3: functionality cookies
  • Category 4: targeting cookies or advertising cookies

Category 1 - Strictly necessary cookies

These cookies are essential in order to enable you to move around the website and use its features,
such as accessing secure areas of the website. Without these cookies services you have asked for,
like register for job alerts, cannot be provided.

Please be aware our site uses this type of cookie

Category 2 - Performance cookies

These cookies collect information about how visitors use a website, for instance which pages visitors go to most often, and if they get error messages from web pages. These cookies don’t collect information that identifies a visitor. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. It is only used to improve how a website works.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 3 - Functionality cookies

These cookies allow the website to remember choices you make (such as your user name and password) and provide enhanced, more personal features. These cookies can also be used to remember changes you have made to text size, fonts and other parts of web pages that you can customize. They may also be used to provide services you have asked for such as watching a video or commenting on a blog. The information these cookies collect may be anonymous and they cannot track your browsing activity on other websites.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 4 - targeting cookies or advertising cookies

These cookies are used to deliver adverts more relevant to you and your interests. They are also used to limit the number of times you see an advertisement as well as help measure the effectiveness of the advertising campaign. They remember that you have visited a website and this information is shared with other organizations such as advertisers. Quite often targeting or advertising cookies will be linked to site functionality provided by the other organizations.

We do have links to other web sites and once you access another site through a link that we have provided it is the responsibility of that site to provide information as to how they use cookies on the respective site.

You can find more information about cookies by visiting www.allaboutcookies.org or
www.youronlinechoices.eu.



Privacy Policy

Harnham places great importance on trust and confidence in our measures to protect your privacy. This page will let you know what information is collected by us and what it is used for.

Your name, address, telephone number and email address is collected by us along with your CV and application data.

Once relevant information has been supplied concerning your application, Harnham will use this information to:
  • Locate suitable employment. Candidates are requested to instruct Harnham on application if they wish for any details to be restricted from any parties or companies they do not wish to Harnham to approach on their behalf.
  • Harnham may keep you informed of job opportunities and contract assignments which we think may be of interest to you
  • Harnham may email you periodically with relevant news and offers (but not from 3rd parties) that complement our efforts to find suitable job opportunities for you

Information Collection and Use

Harnham  is the sole owner of the information collected on this site. We will not sell, share, or rent this information to others. Harnham collects information from our users at several different points on our website.

Registration

We request information from the user on our online registration forms. Here a user must provide contact information and information regarding the type of work you are seeking and your skills, qualifications and experience. This information is used to enable us to provide you with work-finding services. If we have trouble processing your application, this contact information is used to get in touch with you. Harnham does not use this information for any other purpose.

Security Measures

All data stored at Harnham is held in a fully protected environment. We ensure that any data held by us is monitored internally against unauthorized access, destruction, loss or manipulation. Our systems and IT staff remain constantly vigilant to protect the sensitive information we retain.

Correction/Updating Personal Information:

If your personally identifiable information changes (such as office address), we will endeavor to provide a way to correct, update or remove the personal data provided to us. This can usually be done by contacting us directly.

Notification of Changes

If we decide to change our privacy policy, we will post those changes on this page so our users are always aware of what information we collect, how we use it, and under circumstances, if any, we disclose it. If at any point we decide to use personally identifiable information in a manner different from that stated at the time it was collected, we will notify users by way of an email. Users will have a choice as to whether or not we use their information in this different manner. We will use information in accordance with the privacy policy under which the information was collected.

Data retention policy

We will hold your personal data on our systems for as long as is reasonably necessary, and when this information is no longer needed we will securely delete such data. On request, we will provide information in writing about your information stored on our database. If you do not wish us to directly market to you, by phone, email, SMS etc. you may notify us of this in writing. We will then suppress the personal information we hold about you on our database and ensure that your wishes are carried out. Requests to delete personal data will be considered but actioned in accordance with any overriding data protection policy and / or other legal requirements.

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our News & Blogs portal or check out our recent posts below.

Black History Month: Ethical AI and the Bias Within

According to Brigette Hyacinth’s 2017 book entitled, The Future of Leadership, the author suggests this when considering the ramifications of AI. “Using AI to improve efficiency is one thing, using it to judge people isn’t something I would support. It violates the intention on the applications of AI. This seems to be social prejudice masquerading as science…” How often have big tech companies backtracked their facial recognition software? What are the ethical implications of moving forward and leaving AI unchecked and unregulated? 2020 was in no way a traditional year amassing change on our daily lives at near lightspeed, or so it seemed. But what was brought to bear were unrest and tensions boiled to the breaking point. And when you look at it from the perspective of AI in our daily lives. What might the world look like in another year? When Social Sciences and Humanities Meets AI “To err is human, to forgive, divine.” Humans make mistakes. Biases are unmasked with and without intent. But, when it comes to AI, those unintentional biases can have devastating consequences. From 2015 to 2019, use of AI grew by over 250 percent and is projected to boast a revenue of over $100 billion by 2025. As major businesses such as Amazon and IBM cancel and suspend their facial recognition programs amidst protests against racial inequality, some realize more than regulatory change is needed. Since 2014, algorithms have shown biases against people of color and between genders. In a recent article from Time.com, a researcher showed the inaccuracies of prediction for women of color, in particular. Oprah Winfrey, Michelle Obama, and Serena Williams skewed as male. Three of the most recognizable faces in the world and AI algorithms missed the mark. These are the same algorithm and machine learning principles used to challenge humans at strategy games such as Chess and Go. Where’s the disconnect? According to one author, it may be time to create a new field of study specific to AI. Though created in Computer Science and Computer Engineering labs, the complexities of human are more often discussed in the field of humanities. To expand further as well into business schools, race and gender studies, and political science departments. How Did We Get Here? At first blush, it may not seem comparable to consider human history with the rise of artificial intelligence and its applications. Yet it’s human history and its social construct which explains the racial and gender biases when it comes to ethics in AI. How deep seated are such biases? What drives the inequalities when AI-enabled algorithms pass over people of color and women in job searches, credit scores, or assume status quo in incarceration statistics? Disparities between rational and relational are the cornerstone from which to begin. Once again, in Hyacinth’s book, The Future of Leadership, the author tells a story of her mother explaining the community around the simple task of washing clothes. Though washing machines now exist and do allow people to do other things while the clothes are washed, there is a key element recounted by her mother washing machines lack. The benefit of community. When her mother washed clothes, it was her and her surrounding community. They gathered to wash, to visit, and connect. A job was completed, but the experience lingered on. And in the invention of a single machine, that particular bit of community was lost. But it’s community and collaboration which remind humans of their humanity. And it’s from these psychological and sociological roles, artificial intelligence should learn. Create connections between those build the systems and those who will use them.  BUILDING AI FORWARD Voices once shuttered and subjugated have opened doors to move artificial intelligence forward. It is the quintessence of ‘those who don’t know their history are doomed to repeat it’. The difference within this scientific equivalent is there is no history to repeat when it comes to technology. And so it is from the humanitarian angle AI is considered. The ability to do great things with technology is writ in books and screenplays, and so are its dangers. While it isn’t likely an overabundance of ‘Mr. Smiths’ will fill our world, it is important we continue to break out of the siloes of science versus social sciences. If AI is to help humanity move forward, it’s important to ensure humanity plays a role in teaching our machine learning systems how different we are from each other and to consider the whole person, not just their exoskeleton. If you’re interested in the Data Sciences, Data and Technology, Machine Learning, or Robotics just to name a few, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Puzzle and Problem-Solvers: Software Engineers Drive Business

Software. It’s the drivers to your printer. It’s the word processor on your PC. And it’s the concept behind your productivity tools, your CRM systems, and your social media programs. Software engineers are to software what Data Engineers are to Data.  Software Engineers are the creators, builders, and maintainers of software systems and programs, so business runs smoothly. Now, that the majority of businesses have shifted online, it’s more important than ever to keep things running smoothly. These engineers must take into account not only what businesses might need to run, but also the limitations of the program. It’s a balancing act of software, hardware, limitations, and possibilities. If you took apart watches as a kid to see how they worked, Software Engineering might be for you. Are you a problem solver? Do you love putting the pieces of a puzzle together whether it’s on a board or in a crossword? Software Engineering might be for you. What Kind of Software Engineer are You? While there are a variety of roles to consider, below are some of the more popular paths taken. So, let’s say you want to build computer applications that affect what the end user sees. If you know programming languages such as Python and Java, and understand the mechanics of how to make a program work, then you may fit the classic example of a Software Engineer. If you’re more interested in the focus of robotics or automation, you may want to consider a role in Embedded Systems. You’ll still be designing, developing, and maintaining but your projects will be hardware and software used for a specific task.   Want to keep information secure? You may lean toward Security Engineer. In this role, you’ll ensure there are no security flaws. How? By operating as a ‘white-hat’ ethical hacker to attempt breaking into existing systems to identify threats. Technical Skills are Essential. Soft Skills are Important.  For anyone in the Data professions, technical skills are paramount. This not only gets your ‘foot in the door’, but ensures you know the basics. And for those who’ve been in the game a bit longer, also gives businesses confidence you can meet any challenges which may come up. Technical skills for Software Engineers include knowing programming languages like C++, Python, Java, and others like them. In this role, you’ll need to understand development processes as well as additional technical concepts. Technical skills are a standard requirement. And as important as it is to have a good portfolio and experience, you’ll want to show the business, you have the technical know-how to take on anything which may come your way. Now that cross-functional teams across departments are regular occurrences and C-suite executives are in the know, soft skills are just as important as technical skills. What are Soft Skills? In a nutshell, soft skills are communication skills. In the past, Data professionals may have been siloed away from other teams, and a liaison of sorts might have translated Data information into actionable insights. Now businesses and professionals have found it’s much more efficient to have the Engineer speak directly to their team, their leadership, or stakeholders. So, it’s imperative your soft skills are on par with your technical skills. Scope of Work for a Software Engineer According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Software Engineer employment growth is expected to grow 21 percent by 2028. Now that we’re working, studying, and socializing online more than ever, is it any wonder? Add to this the changing needs of organizations as they shift their practices into the cloud, and it’s more important than ever to have professionals who can design and maintain software to meet the needs of an organization. Whichever avenue you choose, whichever business you join or career path you follow, the full scope of work will be broad. You could be in charge of creating, developing, and maintaining a full product or just a single component of an app. Regardless of your scope of work, though, you’ll most likely be working with developers, cross-departmental staff, executives, clients, and stakeholders to mold, shape, and fulfill a design envisioned for their product. If you’re interested in the Data Science, Data Technology, Machine Learning, or Software Engineering, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Robot Companions in Senior Care Combine Computer Vision and AI

It’s 2021. Autonomous cars are no longer on the horizon. They’re here and being tested. Most businesses have shifted to a fully remote workforce or offer a hybrid option. And social activities have been redefined.  As social creatures, we humans crave attention. But does it matter from whom the attention comes?  Social distancing is a gold standard these days to keep the pandemic at bay as best we can. But what happens when the pandemic solutions affect one of the fastest growing demographics in the US?  Many active seniors have embraced the online – FaceTime and Zoom calls with friends and family, online classes for new experiences, and interactive activities to keep minds sharp. For those seniors in eldercare and assisted living, interactive has gotten a shape. Enter the robot. With Deep Learning, Computer Vision is able to enhance what a robot may see or what we see when we look into a robot’s LED face. We’ve worked hard to emulate the human experience in a machine, and have begun putting together instead a machine with human-like experience.  Unsurprisingly, robotics have become part of a variety of industries from manufacturing to construction to…eldercare? Socially Adept Robotic Companions in Senior Living Scenarios Since Jane Jetson ordered Rosey from U-Maid, we’ve wondered and worried about the roles robots might play in our lives. As we remain socially distanced and families and friends make contact through videoconferencing to those in assisted and senior living facilities, we’ve uncovered a new shortage of skilled workers. This time it’s those in the healthcare industries. Particularly those who care for the elderly. There is an ever-widening gap between healthcare workers and those who need them. In less than 10 years, there will be a shortfall of over 150,000 care workers in the US. In twenty years, that shortfall is expected to double. Recently, Robotic Researchers, Roboticists, and Data Scientists have been putting together plans for a robot much like Rosey, the maid was to Jane Jetson. Though expecting residents to only need or want help in things like delivery or picking up and delivering items, it revealed instead a desire for social interaction.  A prototype robot offers assistance from delivery to picking up items to karaoke and bingo activities. Add in a video-conferencing screen for interacting not only with friends and family members who are unable to visit, but also telehealth services with their doctor, or interacting with staff members who may not be nearby. Ways We’re Using Robots to Heal When we teach Artificial Intelligent beings and incorporate Machine Learning into our robots, we’re creating opportunities to heal. Already in use in healthcare from exoskeletons to assist stroke victims to Augmented Reality surgical practice, and real-life robotic assists in surgery, we’re able to help individuals heal physically. For many, the social isolation in eldercare homes can lead to depression and loneliness. But when someone, or rather, some thing is able to interact with them, some find a unique companion. For individuals who have difficulty connecting with people or those suffering dementia, it can be frustrating to not be able to communicate. But the role of robot in our lives just may bring a smile, a story, or a comfort. But robots aren’t just human-size companions. Some robotic companions are in the shape of pets. For those suffering from dementia, a robotic pet offers companionship and a less stressful alternative to live pets. There’s no need to worry about feeding Fido or Fluffy. These robotic pets love to be petted, but they don’t bark or meow, they don’t need to be let out, and bring to their caregivers a sense of purpose.  If you’re interested in the Data Sciences, Computer Vision, Machine Learning, or Robotics just to name a few, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Modelling the Mind with Computational Biology

Since Dolly the sheep was first cloned, humans have had a love-hate relationship with machines. Ok, maybe even before we asked a machine to make a living thing. In a variety of industries, machine learning systems, AI, and robotics are taking on the routine, mundane tasks once reserved for humans. But they’re doing this not to take away from humans, but to give them an opportunity to operate at a higher, creative level.  So, when you’re modelling the mind using Machine Learning and Computational Data in Neuroscience for mind blowing breakthroughs, we sit up and pay attention.  When it comes neuroscience, the benefits far outweigh the pitfalls. Just ask the researchers in China, who’ve developed a way to spot whether or not a child has autism from imaging the back of their eye. Other neurological orders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s falls under the computational neuroscience spectrum as well. From the 1970s to today, computational biology, using analytical, mathematical modelling, and simulation techniques to study behavioral and biological systems has evolved into a variety of subgenres. And it's within these subgenres we get a sneak peek into the mind of man that creates computers that can understand the mind of man. Can you wrap your head around it? Engineering the Mind – Mathematical Relationships The Life Sciences, Biostatistics, and Computational Biology all play a role in physical and mental health care. In seeking to understand the makings of the human mind, to study its syntactic rules, and to help explain how we think, human and machine have come together again. This time in the form of Computational Psychiatry. It’s here we realize our computational theories have often mirrored what we hoped to accomplish in building computers that could think with reason and logic. By understanding how we think, how the brain performs, and how it solves problems, can also help us to identify what we see as abnormalities of the mind – autism, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, dementia, and Parkinson’s disease just to name a few. At its heart, the fundamental message is that the brain’s way solving of inferred problems can be useful in determining hypotheses around neurological disorders.  Even within these subgenres there are varying degrees of theoretical concepts and with the data Computational Biologists and Computational Psychiatrists are able to conduct to navigate the complex inner workings of the brain. But much like the gathering, collecting, and analyzing of the data for the pandemic, the same can be done for in the mental health arena. Not the least of these theorems newly determined comes from a new theoretical model in the journal Medical Hypotheses. In it, T.A. Meridian McDonald, PhD, a research instructor in Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center describes the positive traits of autism.  These positive traits she puts forth include but are not limited to increased attention, increased memory, increase differences in sensory and perception.  Building Computational Relationships Building relationships between neurobiology, environment, and mental signals in computational terms provides a cognitive model to understand the current state of one’s environment. It’s this building of relationships upon which human minds and the inner workings of the machine come together for the common good. There are positives in the negative. Mindset shifts aren’t just for learning how to work online or be more mindful, but are how best to present, and put your best foot forward. If you’re interested in Life Science Analytics, Computational Biology, Decision Science, Machine Learning, or Robotics just to name a few, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.    For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

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