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Site Terms/ Cookie Policy / Privacy Policy


Site Terms

Access to and use of the Harnham website is subject to the following terms and conditions.

Copyright

Copyright ©  Harnham 2013. All rights reserved. All copy and other intellectual property rights in all text, images, sounds, software and other materials on this site are owned by Harnham, or are included with permission of the relevant owner.

You are permitted to browse this site and to reproduce extracts by way of printing, downloading to a hard disk and by distribution to other people but in all cases, for non-commercial, informational and personal purposes only. No reproduction of any part of this site may be sold or distributed for commercial gain, nor shall it be modified or incorporated in any other work, publication or site. No other licence or right is granted.

Trademarks

All trademarks displayed on this site are either owned or used under licence by Harnham.

Contents

The information on this site has been included in good faith but is for general informational purposes only. It should not be relied on for any specific purpose and no representation or warranty is given as regards its accuracy, completeness or fitness for any particular purpose. Save to the extent that such limitation is not permitted under English Law Harnham, nor any of it's employees shall be liable for any loss, damage or expense arising in contract, tort or otherwise out of any reliance on information contained in this site, access to or use of or inability to use this site or any site linked to it including, without limitation, any loss of profit, indirect, incidental or consequential loss.

Use

Your information and activity on this site must not:

  • be false, inaccurate or misleading
  • be in breach of any applicable laws, regulations, licences, or third party rights
  • interfere in any way with the proper working of this site, and in particular you must not circumvent security, tamper with, hack into or disrupt the operation of the site or surreptitiously intercept, access without authority or expropriate any system, date or personal information as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998.

This site is intended normally to be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
You agree to fully reimburse Harnham in respect of all losses, costs, actions, claims, and liabilities incurred by Harnham as a result of any breach or non-observance by you of these terms or any data submitted by you to us.

Harnham will make all reasonable attempts to exclude viruses (and similar destructive devices) from the site but cannot guarantee the exclusion of viruses (and similar destructive devices), and you should take appropriate steps in respect of this risk.

Linked sites

At various points throughout the site, you may be offered automatic links to other internet sites relevant to a particular aspect of this site. This does not indicate that Harnham are necessarily associated with any of these other sites or their owners. While it is the intention of Harnham that you should find these other sites of interest, neither Harnham nor their employees shall have any responsibility or liability of any nature for these other sites or information contained in them.

These terms shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law and each party to these terms submits to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English Courts.

Company Registration Number: 05723485. Registered Address: 1st Floor, Ashville House, 131-139 The Broadway, Wimbledon, London, SW19 1QJ. Registered by Companies House, Cardiff.



Cookie Policy

If you are uncertain about what a cookie is have a look at our simple guide to find out how we use them on our website.

What is a cookie?

Cookies are text files containing small amounts of information which are downloaded to your device when you visit a website. Cookies are then sent back to the originating website on each subsequent visit, or to another website that recognizes that cookie.

Cookies do lots of different jobs, like letting you navigate between pages efficiently remembering your preferences, and generally improve your web site experience. They can also help to ensure that adverts you see online are more relevant to you and your interests.

We can split cookies into 4 main categories:

  • Category 1: strictly necessary cookies
  • Category 2: performance cookies
  • Category 3: functionality cookies
  • Category 4: targeting cookies or advertising cookies

Category 1 - Strictly necessary cookies

These cookies are essential in order to enable you to move around the website and use its features,
such as accessing secure areas of the website. Without these cookies services you have asked for,
like register for job alerts, cannot be provided.

Please be aware our site uses this type of cookie

Category 2 - Performance cookies

These cookies collect information about how visitors use a website, for instance which pages visitors go to most often, and if they get error messages from web pages. These cookies don’t collect information that identifies a visitor. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. It is only used to improve how a website works.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 3 - Functionality cookies

These cookies allow the website to remember choices you make (such as your user name and password) and provide enhanced, more personal features. These cookies can also be used to remember changes you have made to text size, fonts and other parts of web pages that you can customize. They may also be used to provide services you have asked for such as watching a video or commenting on a blog. The information these cookies collect may be anonymous and they cannot track your browsing activity on other websites.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 4 - targeting cookies or advertising cookies

These cookies are used to deliver adverts more relevant to you and your interests. They are also used to limit the number of times you see an advertisement as well as help measure the effectiveness of the advertising campaign. They remember that you have visited a website and this information is shared with other organizations such as advertisers. Quite often targeting or advertising cookies will be linked to site functionality provided by the other organizations.

We do have links to other web sites and once you access another site through a link that we have provided it is the responsibility of that site to provide information as to how they use cookies on the respective site.

You can find more information about cookies by visiting www.allaboutcookies.org or
www.youronlinechoices.eu.



Privacy Policy

Harnham places great importance on trust and confidence in our measures to protect your privacy. This page will let you know what information is collected by us and what it is used for.

Your name, address, telephone number and email address is collected by us along with your CV and application data.

Once relevant information has been supplied concerning your application, Harnham will use this information to:
  • Locate suitable employment. Candidates are requested to instruct Harnham on application if they wish for any details to be restricted from any parties or companies they do not wish to Harnham to approach on their behalf.
  • Harnham may keep you informed of job opportunities and contract assignments which we think may be of interest to you
  • Harnham may email you periodically with relevant news and offers (but not from 3rd parties) that complement our efforts to find suitable job opportunities for you

Information Collection and Use

Harnham  is the sole owner of the information collected on this site. We will not sell, share, or rent this information to others. Harnham collects information from our users at several different points on our website.

Registration

We request information from the user on our online registration forms. Here a user must provide contact information and information regarding the type of work you are seeking and your skills, qualifications and experience. This information is used to enable us to provide you with work-finding services. If we have trouble processing your application, this contact information is used to get in touch with you. Harnham does not use this information for any other purpose.

Security Measures

All data stored at Harnham is held in a fully protected environment. We ensure that any data held by us is monitored internally against unauthorized access, destruction, loss or manipulation. Our systems and IT staff remain constantly vigilant to protect the sensitive information we retain.

Correction/Updating Personal Information:

If your personally identifiable information changes (such as office address), we will endeavor to provide a way to correct, update or remove the personal data provided to us. This can usually be done by contacting us directly.

Notification of Changes

If we decide to change our privacy policy, we will post those changes on this page so our users are always aware of what information we collect, how we use it, and under circumstances, if any, we disclose it. If at any point we decide to use personally identifiable information in a manner different from that stated at the time it was collected, we will notify users by way of an email. Users will have a choice as to whether or not we use their information in this different manner. We will use information in accordance with the privacy policy under which the information was collected.

Data retention policy

We will hold your personal data on our systems for as long as is reasonably necessary, and when this information is no longer needed we will securely delete such data. On request, we will provide information in writing about your information stored on our database. If you do not wish us to directly market to you, by phone, email, SMS etc. you may notify us of this in writing. We will then suppress the personal information we hold about you on our database and ensure that your wishes are carried out. Requests to delete personal data will be considered but actioned in accordance with any overriding data protection policy and / or other legal requirements.

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our News & Blogs portal or check out our recent posts below.

Big Data In Politics – Win, Lose, Or Draw

Big Data In Politics – Win, Lose, Or Draw

In the movie Definitely, Maybe starring Ryan Reynolds, there’s a scene in which he must sell tables for a political campaign dinner fundraiser. He makes call after call with no luck. Finally, in frustration, he speaks plainly and finds a connection between the politician and the prospective donor. In an instant, he understands. Make the connection and you can’t go wrong. This is the 90’s version of micro-targeting. Online advertising today has honed targeted Marketing to an art form and it’s infused every industry from Fisherman’s Wharf to Wall Street to Washington. Messages are crafted on detailed profiles of what makes us unique such as hopes, fears, dreams, emotional triggers, and more which is then taken out of the hands of humans. Enter such deep, personal details into automated technologies and you’ll get automated reactions. How did we get here? Ever since Cicero’s brother, Quintus, who approached politics with a do anything to win mindset, we’ve been working toward this point. But, when it comes to technological advances within politics, George Simmel put it best when he wrote around 1915, “the vast intensive and extensive growth of our technology…entangles us in a web of means, and means toward means, more and more intermediate stages, causing us to lose sight of our real ultimate ends.”  What does this mean? It means we have moved so quickly and with such intensity as we push inwards while reaching outward, we get tangled up in our own systems. Before we know it, it’s difficult to separate the means from their ends, and we lose sight of our purpose. In other words, it can be hard to keep our sense of direction with our constant distraction of tasks, systems, and processes. According to Simmel, this would soon morph into what he called a ‘fragmentary character.’ Like a mosaic, we put the pieces back together and assemble the bits to fit our concept of the world.   The Digitizing of Campaigns Traditional campaigning has traditionally looked much like the movie scene mentioned above with phone banks, whiteboards, and handmade signs. But, today, things are changing. Everyone has at least one smart device which can sync information in real time to a range of devices. Algorithms and predictive modeling help reduce the guesswork, though gut feeling and instinct still prevail. At least, for now. Our machines are learning how to learn about us and define what we believe and wish to see by historical Data, or rather our past behaviors. Where psychographic profiling meets micro-targeting. What was once only seen in the Marketing world has now entered politics. Just like marketers want to know what people are interested in, so to do politicians wish to know what voters think. To do this, both industries will study behavioral and attitudinal profiles to help understand a demographic better or discern a gap in the marketplace. In consumer research, companies rely on psychographic micro-targeting to reach smaller groups and individuals. The key question here is to ask is to what extent are politicians prepared to pass laws that restrict their own opportunities to know more about voters. Just as the next generation of voters are coming, so too are the next generation of tools being developed.  One Final Thought… Over the last 20 years or so, we have built an immense Data structure from mobile devices to social media to modelling processes and more. With this kind of connectivity combined with fragmentary media, the use of Data Analysis has a big role to play going forward. If we seek change in our political and social infrastructures, we will have to reimagine the structures currently in place. From algorithmic modelling to AI and Machine Learning, the possibilities for new ideologies has emerged blurring the lines between context and production in which Data underpins capitalism. As those in Data Analytics continue to pursue an uninterrupted (read: non-fragmentary) vision of the world, we find ourselves at a new stage in history of where both looking back and looking forward at the same time informs our future.   Where would you like to go? If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to find out more:  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Going Green With Big Data

Going Green With Big Data

Greta Thunberg sailed the Atlantic to come the UN to talk about climate change. Her mother, a renowned opera singer, has given up air travel to support her daughter’s efforts. There is a zero-waste movement to lessen our trash and help alleviate the carbon footprints from our buying, traveling and more. These are steps humans have made. Yet technological advances may make it possible to flip the script for the environment and Big Data has a big role to play.   What are Some of the Advances Taking Place? Technological advances have brought us breakthroughs in modern science and in every industry. Now, we are at a time and place in where our technologies cam help tackle climate change. From modeling to predictions, we can begin to build not just a map of environmental concerns, but begin to build a road toward a solution. Below are just a few of the ways technology is being used to advance solutions for climate change. AI modeling makes it easier to identify problemsPredictive Analytics models can create different scenarios to see ‘what happens if?’Big Data is used to identify areas which need immediate attention This is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to using technology to predict and identify climate concerns. While some parts of the world contribute more to the problem than others, Big Data has made it possible to draw conclusions where the hardest hit areas are and is key to addressing the problem. But whatever Data brings, the information is useless if it isn’t used to formulate and put forward better environmental practices and policies.  Ways to Upscale Urban Data Science  Manhattan, Berlin, and New Delhi, as varied as they are, have one thing in common. They’re often sites for case studies when it comes to analyzing our environment. However, our advances continue to improve and we’re able to learn from state-of-the-art Data infrastructures. These can include such things as social media data combined with earth observations to see how they might better integrate. A research publication in Berlin suggest three routes for expanding knowledge. They are: Mainstream Data collectionsAmplify Big Data and Machine Learning to scale solutions and maintain privacyUse computational methods to analyze qualitative Data With these advances in place, there is a chance urban climate solutions could effect change on a global scale. With the proper Data of urban areas in place, including that of related greenhouse gases, socio-economic issues, and climate threats, Data professionals can get a clearer picture of what needs to be done. Building on the advances that are in place with the integrated technologies of AI, Predictive Analytics, and Big Data helps make big strides in combatting climate change. According to reports, only about 100 cities make up 20% of the global carbon footprint. Yet 97% of climate concerns are focused in urban areas. There’s still a lot which remains to be done to combat the greatest issue of our age, but working hand in hand – machine and human – we just might find ourselves on reprieve and the chance to leave the world better than we found it for the next generation. The next Greta Thunbergs of the world. If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Data Engineer Or Software Engineer: What Does Your Business Need?

We are in a time in which what we do with Data matters. Over the last few years, we have seen a rapid rise in the number of Data Scientists and Machine Learning Engineers as businesses look to find deeper insights and improve their strategies. But, without proper access to the right Data that has been processed and massaged, Data Scientists and Machine Learning Engineers would be unable to do their job properly.   So who are the people who work in the background and are responsible to make sure all of this works? The quick answer is Data Engineers!... or is it? In reality, there are two similar, yet different profiles who can help help a company achieve their Data-driven goals.  Data Engineers  When people think of Data Engineers, they think of people who make Data more accessible to others within an organization. Their responsibility is to make sure the end user of the Data, whether it be an Analyst, Data Scientist, or an executive, can get accurate Data from which the business can make insightful decisions. They are experts when it comes to data modeling, often working with SQL.  Frequently, “modern” Data Engineers work with a number of tools including Spark, Kafka, and AWS (or any cloud provider), whilst some newer Databases/Data Warehouses include Mongo DB and Snowflake. Companies are choosing to leverage these technologies and update their stack because it allows Data teams to move at a much faster pace and be able to deliver results to their stakeholders.   An enterprise looking for a Data Engineer will need someone to focus more on their Data Warehouse and utilize their strong knowledge of querying information, whilst constantly working to ingest/process Data. Data Engineers also focus more on Data Flow and knowing how each Data sets works in collaboration with one another.    Software Engineers - Data Similar to a Data Engineers, Software Engineers - Data ( who I will refer to as Software Data Engineers in this article) also build out Data Pipelines. These individuals might go by different names like Platform or Infrastructure Engineer. They have to be good with SQL and Data Modeling, working with similar technologies such as Spark, AWS, and Hadoop. What separates Software Data Engineers from Data Engineers is the necessity to look at things from a macro-level. They are responsible for building out the cluster manager and scheduler, the distributed cluster system, and implementing code to make things function faster and more efficiently.  Software Data Engineers are also better programers. Frequently, they will work in Python, Java, Scala, and more recently, Golang. They also work with DevOps tools such as Docker, Kubernetes, or some sort of CI/CD tool like Jenkins. These skills are critical as Software Data Engineers are constantly testing and deploying new services to make systems more efficient.   This is important to understand, especially when incorporating Data Science and Machine Learning teams. If Data Scientists or Machine Learning Engineers do not have a strong Software Engineers in place to build their platforms, the models they build won’t be fully maximized. They also have to be able to scale out systems as their platform grows in order to handle more Data, while finding ways to make improvements. Software Data Engineers will also be looking to work with Data Scientists and Machine Learning Engineers in order to understand the prerequisites of what is needed to support a Machine Learning model.   Which is right for your business?  If you are looking for someone who can focus extensively on pulling Data from a Data source or API, before transforming or “massaging” the Data, and then moving it elsewhere, then you are looking for a Data Engineer. Quality Data Engineers will be really good at querying Data and Data Modeling and will also be good at working with Data Warehouses and using visualization tools like Tableau or Looker.   If you need someone who can wear multiple hats and build highly scalable and distributed systems, you are looking for a Software Data Engineer. It's more common to see this role in smaller companies and teams, since Hiring Managers often need someone who can do multiple tasks due to budget constraints and the need for a leaner team. They will also be better coders and have some experience working with DevOps tools. Although they might be able to do more than a Data Engineer, Software Data Engineers may not be as strong when it comes to the nitty gritty parts of Data Engineering, in particular querying Data and working within a Data Warehouse.  It is always a challenge knowing which type of job to recruit for. It is not uncommon to see job posts where companies advertise that they are looking for a Data Engineer, but in reality are looking for a Software Data Engineer or Machine Learning Platform Engineer. In order to bring the right candidates to your door, it is crucial to have an understanding of what responsibilities you are looking to be fulfilled. That's not to say a Data Engineer can't work with Docker or Kubernetes. Engineers are working in a time where they need to become proficient with multiple tools and be constantly honing their skills to keep up with the competition. However, it is this demand to keep up with the latest tech trends and choices that makes finding the right candidate difficult. Hiring Managers need to identify which skills are essential for the role from the start, and which can be easily picked up on the job. Hiring teams should focus on an individual's past experience and the projects they have worked on, rather than looking at their previous job titles.  If you're looking to hire a Data Engineer or a Software Data Engineer, or to find a new role in this area, we may be able to help.  Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch if you have any questions. 

Sean Byrnes, CEO Of Outlier.Ai, On Creating A Business With Values

Sean Byrnes, CEO Of Outlier.Ai, On Creating A Business With Values

We sat down with Sean Byrnes, CEO of Outlier, an Analytics solution provider, to learn more about Outlier and its values. He also shared us with the power a candidate has when applying and interviewing for jobs in the tech industry today as well as how employers can retain their top talent. How long has Outlier been in business? We’ve been in business about four years. Prior to starting Outlier, I had another company called Flurry which we sold in 2014. When we sold it, I took a year off to reset my internal counter. I needed to reorient my work/life balance and then, when I felt I was in good shape to get back into things, we kicked off the launch of Outlier.  When you began Outlier, did you plan to map out your values of diversity, inclusion, transparency, and work/life balance? Or did it evolve as the company grew? Planning out our values is one of the first things my co-founder, Mike Kim, did when we were starting the company. It was intentional. We sat down and wrote down those values you see on the website.   I learned a lot in my previous company and there were a lot of things I did which followed the values we have which we didn’t follow intentionally. It just felt…right. Growing up in New York, a very diverse place, having a diverse team always felt more natural to me than a homogenous team. Add to that, having just spent a year with my new daughter and adjusting to being a parent and what that meant; it put things in perspective.  If there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s this. There’s no reward for running a company well. There’s no reward for following good practices and treating your employers with respect. In fact, the reason I started my first company was that I’d worked a lot of places that treated employers like resources or like widgets.  You put salary in one side and productivity comes out the other. I wanted to work somewhere that treated people like people. So, I started Flurry, and now have come into Outlier with a solid idea of our values and company culture. As important as tech skills are, there’s no data to support a feedback mechanism and predict success. Success comes from unexpected places.  So, by sitting down and writing out those values, we weren’t just signing up for a contract for how we would treat the people.  In our way, we were standing up as an example of how you can build a tech company that didn’t follow these bad habits.   Someone said, not too long ago, that the best employees stay in the same company for about 20-months before moving on to their next project. Often, it’s because the employee no longer feels creative.  In thinking through your company values statements, what would you say to a business who’s hoping to both attract and retain their top talent? Or do you think it’s better for these individuals to rotate off in order to keep things moving?  Tech companies typically have two problems: Companies are so desperate to keep going, they do whatever they can to survive. They promise themselves they’ll make compromises and fix the short cuts when the time is right.  So, they hire people who need not share their values or may not meet their criteria with a promise that when the company is successful, they will fix it and that time never comes. You’re never at a point where you’re so successful you can go back and remake those mistakes or fix them.For many, recruiting is a one-way system. You search for and hire a candidate, then another, and another without really putting much thought into it.  The reality is that you can’t build a high growth business that way. What you have to believe is that if you spend the time to find the great people that enjoy working on what you working on, where you treat them with respect, you give them not just responsibility but also the authority to do things that you create gravity. You create a world where the people you hire pull in the next group of people because people really want to work them, they want to be in that environment. A lot of our most recent hires here at Outlier are people that came to us, who wanted to work in this environment and when they saw how great our team are they want to add to that and it becomes a self-fulfilling cycle where the larger your core of great people the better your gravity is, the more great people it pulls in and so the gravity needs to expand and that’s how you build a high grow organization. You don’t build a high growth organization by having the best sourcing process, by having the largest recruiting team, the best employ onboarding. You grow the fastest if you can create a community and an environment people want to work in and when it becomes self-evident of that then you start to pull people in. And so those become the culmination.  How do the values that you’ve initiated affect your company? Have you found that those values foster a deeper loyalty and higher moral than in other places and other business that sound a little bit like yours?  We have a very low attrition rate. Yeah, people have left due to life changes, but otherwise we still have the same people we started with though their roles may have changed as we grew. There was nothing we set out to do, nothing on purpose to keep them, but just did things which felt right. In retrospect, it comes down to this. If you create an environment where people are learning, where they feel valued, and they enjoy the work, why would they leave? Where would you go? What could you prefer to that environment? I think by focusing on this early, it’s led to more employee retention.  My hope is that everybody’s who’s here will continue along the journey as we build the company together. Another example is our work/life balance. Both my co-founder and I are parents of young kids. My first few hires were parents of young kids. So, being family friendly has always been a core value of ours from the beginning.   Being family friendly is both a conceptual and a practical concept. Our policy is to be in the office three days per week and work from home two days per week. This gives our parents a chance to do things like take their kids to the doctor or attend a parent/teacher meeting. It’s become an enormously strong aspect for us because there’s a lot of people who have young kids and they don’t want to work in your stereotypical tech company. You know the one, the company who expects you to be in the office for twelve hours a day seven days a week.   Our employees like the challenge of building tech companies, but they need the flexibility we offer, too. So, just by having a simple stand of valuing people as people and parents as parents, means we have a competitive advantage in recruiting for roles. The senior people who can contribute at a very high level where they suddenly didn’t have any options and this is a chance for them to keep doing what they doing. They’re able to do what they love and not feel they have to compromise their family on its behalf.   It’s the kind of thing where very simple principles becomes an enormously strong competitive strong advantage in todays market. While it hasn’t been true for very long, it has definitely been the case so far for us. If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

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