Summer - A slow time for recruitment?





Having just completed my first summer living and working in New York, I have found that I have been repeatedly asked by many people here, about the differences between The Big Apple and London.

For example:

  • “Do you like that it is much hotter (and more humid) here”?
  • “Isn't it great that the subway is air-conditioned”? (Although the platform at Times Square is possibly the hottest place on Earth)

And

  • “Do you love that you can sit at a bar 54 floors up and actually get a seat to enjoy the amazing view”?

I can happily say, the answer to all of the questions is a resounding yes!


The $64,000,000 question

More importantly, I have noticed that more and more people have been asking me – “Is this a slow time of year for recruitment”?

My standard response to this kind of question when in the UK always used to be a resolute:  “No faster or slower than any other time of year, the analytics market is so busy that it doesn't matter what month it is.” But then I was promptly corrected by a deluge of  “Out of Office” replies entering my inbox. Shocking as this was initially, admittedly some of them were wittier than others, and softened the blow. To compound matters candidates began to reschedule interviews, as they realized they clashed with trips to the Hamptons for the whole month of August! This on top of the fact that I have generally found nobody is contactable on a Friday afternoon.

This is a stark juxtaposition to the working culture in London. Perhaps this is because there, people would rather be in the office than out in the rain; which as I hear lasted most of August this year.


The sunny side of summer

Then again having the majority of people pre-occupied during the summer can be a good thing. If a client has a specific need, and the perfect candidate happens to be in New York for the summer, then surely we can get the hiring process completed in a matter of hours?


        "Upon reflection, if someone asked me today if it’s a slow time of year then I would answer with yes. But only if you want it to be. If you are focused on hiring a whole analytics team, then you will get a head-start on all of your competitors."

Don’t get me wrong, this is not the tale of woe that it may initially seem from the outset. The Harnham New York office has been extremely busy this summer. We have been warmly welcomed by everyone we meet, and there are always things that need to be done. It has been a great chance to catch up with a lot of the candidates/clients who we have gotten to know over the past few months whilst we have been here. As of today (the day after Labor Day and the unofficial end to the summer), I have had more emails asking for help with recruitment than I can ever remember, and I know the competition for candidates is only going to get fiercer. 

 
Make a Proactive Start

As we are establishing ourselves in the Big Apple it would be interesting to know if our summer cultural baptism is typical within the Digital analytics space. Are we just lucky that business has revived after the summer exodus? Did you have an interview process that stopped in June and hasn't restarted; or did you use the time to get prepared for interviews?

If you are a client looking to recruit before the end of the financial year or a candidate looking to make a move before the Holidays then get in touch. I am going to be available until I become a real New Yorker and take the whole of August off next year!


 Joe Gibbs
 Joe Gibbs LinkedIn

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