Resume Tips for Marketing Analytics



Writing a new resume can often to be a more challenging task than you initially think. Accurately portraying your skills, breadth of experience and knowledge within a few short pages is a tough task. There are a number of online guides about how to write a good resume, along with a variety of opinions on what works; questions around the latest style, layout and how many pages it should be, make this a very subjective topic.

We have written the guide below to give you some useful tips around writing your resume, based on feedback from employers about what they expect to see on a Marketing Analytics & Insight professional’s resume. Consider this quote from one of our clients:

 “…the point of having an analyst in a business is to accurately condense and analyze large volumes of data and draw out the relevant pieces of information that can have an impact on a business. An analyst should be able to sift through irrelevant information and draw everything together to highlight relevant information in a compelling way. If an analyst isn’t able to have the same approach with their resume and draw out the information that is relevant and discard the rest, it doesn’t give a good impression or an indicator that they will be an effective analyst.”

So how do you go about making sure that your resume does give the right impression and get you that interview opportunity?

 

Get the structure right

A good structure should typically follow this order:

  • Name and contact details (Include contact number and email)
  • Personal Statement / Summary
  • Key Skills
  • Employment History
  • Education
  • Interests
  • References

However, don’t be afraid to deviate from this structure in order to demonstrate your relevance for a particular position more effectively. If you are a recent graduate, with a relevant mathematical degree, but little or no relevant employment history, you are likely to have more success by highlighting your relevant academic background above your employment history.


Layout and formatting

Use a clear layout and include headings to separate each of the above sections. Within each section use bullet points to define your role, responsibilities and skills rather than long paragraphs full of commas. This will help to make the content far easier to scan for key information and is more likely to grab the attention of the employer.

Keep the whole document relatively short, 2-3 pages maximum.

Pay attention to detail and spelling: many of our clients reject applications based on this – remember our client quote! Ensure all information is accurate; dates, company names, skills, technologies used and don’t be shy of Spell Check.

Make sure all formatting is consistent: we recommend you use the same font throughout the document and utilize bold to highlight subsections and headings. Typically, fonts such as Arial or Times New Roman are acceptable. 


Content - Be specific

The content should be clear and concise, but with enough information to give the employer a solid understanding of what your role entails and what your responsibilities are.

It is useful to give a brief introduction to the company and / or team to add context, but essentially the employer is going to be more interested in hearing about your skills and responsibilities and not those of the team in general.

With regards to the data sets, statistical tools and techniques you typically employ, specific information here is also key. For example;

You highlight that you use SAS in your current role. Try to elaborate on this i.e. Are you using Enterprise Guide, Macro, Base? Do you write your own code or employ more drag and drop techniques?

You also work with propensity models. Did you build the model or are you working on existing models and validation? Do also have experience of clustering, segmentation, regression or similar techniques?

You work with a range of data sets. What kind of data is it; Transactional, campaign? Make sure you explain. It’s also important to remember that large data sets are typically appealing to companies; therefore ensure you refer to the size of the data sets you’ve been exposed to. For example, how many rows of data do you typically deal with, or how many campaigns are you used to running each month?

Adding these snippets of key information won’t take up a lot of valuable space, but will help give your prospective employer a more detailed understanding of your skills and level of competence, ultimately, helping boost your chance of securing an interview. 


Tailor your resume

Lastly, tailor your resume for each role you are applying for:

Carefully read the job adverts and descriptions and highlight relevant pieces of information to showcase your skills and experience that most suited to what the company are looking for.

Likewise, amend your personal statement for the same reason. Don’t be the person who applies for a Customer Insight Analyst position with a Retail & FMCG consultancy when your personal statement still says you are looking for a Marketing based role in a Client side Financial Services organization.


Your resume is your sales pitch

Remember, resume's are meant to be factual but they are also a tool to sell yourself, so make the content interesting, relevant and engaging – this could be the only opportunity you have to convince an organization that you are someone they want to interview and help you stand out from the other applications they receive.


Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our News & Blogs portal or check out our recent posts below.

The Science Behind the Sales: Statistical Modelling and Consumer Insights

Black Friday, once reserved for the Friday after Thanksgiving, has a new lease on life. It’s not just one day a year. Now, it can be any day of the year. Why? Customers the world over appreciate the deals and discounts as they get ready for the holidays, and the insights gleaned from previous years help businesses determine what will sell best in the current year.  Add in the rise of mobile marketing in which you can buy anything, anywhere, anytime, and more people working from home than ever before, and you have the recipe for Black Friday every day. Especially once the leaves begin to Fall and the holiday season comes knocking at our doors. Behind Advanced Analytics & Insights within the Data profession, there are a host of professions which together help to create the products and launch them. Who could imagine the science behind the sales? Five Important Roles Behind Advanced Analytics & Insights There’s a reason that Data professionals are no longer siloed and must work across and within departments. Data influences every decision within business today. So, having the right people on your team in the right roles can ensure your business thrives. Marketing Analyst Using a spoke-and-wheel analogy, the Marketing Analyst is the spoke. These are the professionals central to taking the information from their Campaign Analysts, Pricing Analysts, and Statistical Modelling experts to determine what will sell best and what price. In essence, their research and Data helps companies figure out ‘what the market will bear.’ Campaign Analyst Focused campaigns to a target market will find a Campaign Analyst understands consumer behaviors. Once the customer is understood – what they buy, when they buy, why and how they buy – can help analysts measure, review, and justify each campaign to justify ROI.Consumer Insights While the Campaign Analyst is focused on targeted campaigns to specific customers, the Consumer Insights Analyst helps businesses tailor their marketing strategies to meet the needs of those customers. All of them. Whether they’re part of a targeted marketing campaign or if they’re prospective clients ‘window shopping’ when they download a ‘free product or click on an email’. Understanding these consumers helps to convert from passing interest to the purchase of a product or service. Statistical Modelling Analyst Do you love puzzles? A jumble of pieces which need to be put together so everyone can see the full picture?  Statistical Modelling are the jigsaw puzzle solvers of the Marketing department. These professionals pull together data from multiple sources and analyze the information to help form a clear picture of their ideal consumer. Toss in a bit of psychology – why customers do what they do and predict what they might do next – and your executives will understand the best way to distribute funds to grow their business. Pricing Analyst It seems simple enough. Determine how much it cost to produce a product or service and mark it up to make a profit, right? Not exactly. These days, calculating not only what it cost to make a product, any overhead to consider, and how much you need to mark it to make a profit is a complex prospect. Factor in what your competition is doing…on a global scale. Consider the fickle buying power of consumers – some days money flows and some days it’s reigned in tight. How do you determine the best price at the right time to ensure maximum profit while keeping pulse on spending patterns? Pricing Analysts take complex data, study customer spending habits, and conduct analyses on what the math says and what the impact might be. So, back to Black Friday sales. Taking what we know of the roles which help businesses set the tone for their marketing strategies, Black Friday every day makes sense. We’re home more. The lines between work and family life are blurred, but computers and phones are at our fingertips, and everyone delivers what we need right to our door. Why not get a jump on your holiday shopping? And once that’s done, you can focus on what your plans are for the future. Are you looking for a career change or just want to see what the market looks like within the Data professionals industry? There is plenty of information to be collected and analyzed. What role might you fill? If you’re looking for a role in Data & Analytics or are interested in Advanced Analytics & Insights, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.   For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

How Digital Analytics & Marketing Help Shape E-Commerce

Since the days of store window displays, the shopping experience has been just that; an experience. So, what happens when you want to recreate the visceral and emotional experience of shopping from within the confines of a computer screen, smartphone, or tablet? Enter Digital and Marketing Analytics. According to a recent report by Adobe, e-commerce sales have seen a 77% jump year-over-year which at any other time in history should have taken 4 to 6 years. The COVID-19 pandemic has helped to escalate and drive these numbers leaving some businesses scrambling and others raking it in. So, what’s the difference? Data professionals. The Role of Data in E-Commerce Whether you buy online and pick up in store or have a product delivered to your door, the role of shopping has irrevocably changed. Ensuring consumers get the personalized experience they’re used to from the days of brick-and-mortar stores, retail stores have turned to Digital and Marketing Analytics to give their customers the shopping experience they’re used to within a different format. Professionals within the UI/UX Design vertical are particularly sought after. Buying habits are changing and competition is fierce. So, how does Data affect e-commerce? Here are 3 examples: Know Your Customer. No longer a lamented visage from yesteryear, knowing your customer is inherent to the survival of an online retailer.  Data professionals bring to life the customer through historical data, demographics, and creates products and services which elicit an emotional response to stop, look around, and buy. And if the cart gets abandoned, follow up email campaigns to jog the memory that you were here and were thinking about buying this or that item. Get Personal. Personalize shopping has evolved into the personal shopping experience. What made someone buy a product during their last visit? Dynamic presentation and emotion-driven verbiage can certainly contribute.  When an online retailer knows what the buyer wants or needs and presents it in a way that resonates. This is the personalization once the domain of sales clerks.  From the Data you enter at checkout to the social media platforms and search engines with information like what you’re looking for, where you’re located, your purchase history and more can sometimes leave the personalized experience out in the cold. Bridging the old personalization with the new is the key ingredient for successful online retailers. Sell Where Your Consumers are Buying. If your customers are on Facebook looking for a product or service, sell to them where they’re looking. Though reviews are still important, even more prevalent is the range of social influencers to help buyers make decisions. Enter social commerce. Layout, design, Data gathering, collecting, and analyzing all have a slightly different flavor within this construct.  Data Professionals in Demand Within the Digital Analytics and Marketing specialism are a variety of Data professionals in demand as retailers are forced online. Businesses need E-Commerce Analysts to help present the new normal for the online retailer. As buy online and pick up in store convenience increases as well as purchases made from devices such as your smartphone, there’s been a rise in demand for Web & Mobile Product Management as well. Digital Transformation is no longer at the doorstep of business, it has crossed the threshold. And rather than focus on one tool or another, the impetus is on the importance of having more than one tool at a candidate’s disposal. What candidates want has changed and evolved as well. Salary and bonuses have dwindled while the demand for experience and professional development have become rallying cries for finding and retaining top talent. For more information In our recently released 2020 Salary Guide we discuss each specialism. What’s working. What isn’t. And how businesses can hire and retain top talent to keep their projects on track and their businesses running smoothly. You can download your copy here.  If you’re interested in Data and Technology, Risk or Digital Analytics, Life Sciences Analytics, Advanced Analytics & Insight, Data Science, or Computer Vision, we invite you to check out our latest jobs. If you’d like to learn more, contact one of our expert consultants: For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Which Skillset Do You Need: Data Science or Advanced Analytics?

According to our 2020 US Data & Analytics Salary Guide, there has been a recent uptick in leadership roles within the Data & Analytics industry. Stemming from the skillset which is equally balanced between technical and communicative abilities, this field is fast approaching a 50/50 gender split. These are the leadership roles for which businesses are seeking employees who can translate business objectives into actionable insights, and yet, too often businesses think this is the role of the Data Scientist. As Data Science, Machine Learning, and other terms in the Data industry change to encompass new roles, it is imperative businesses understand what skillset they need to fill which role. So, here’s a quick comparison to help navigate which role has the best skillset for your needs. TRADITIONAL DUTIES OF A DATA SCIENTIST  Understand one or more coding languages such as R, Hadoop, SQL, Apache Spark, etc.Able to collect, gather, and analyze Data from past and current applications for business recommendations.Craft statistical models for planning and implementing strategies. While it’s true these three duties are similar to an Advanced Analytics Skillset, the advanced skillset takes things a bit further.  TRADITIONAL DUTIES OF A CHIEF DATA OR ANALYTICS OFFICER As this role leans a bit more toward the Advanced Analytics skillset, let’s take a look at where it jumps off from the traditional Data Scientist role. Create a Data Strategy and communicate the vision of that strategy.Create Data access policies and strategize with business executives. Oversee a variety of functions including Data Management, Data Governance. Whether the title is Chief Data Officer or Chief Analytics Officer, these are the high-level roles which might report to the CEO or COO rather than the CIO. The Chief Data Officer falls within the senior executive team and is responsible for not only the Data Strategy and its governance, but explaining its benefits in clear language to the other executives. WHEN BUSINESS & CANDIDATE EXPECTATIONS ALIGN  Though Advanced Analytics teams have remained strong during the pandemic, and the field is ever-changing as businesses understand which skillset they need for what job, there has been some turnover in the past.  So, why the turnover if it’s an expanding field? The answer is two-fold in that oftentimes, the candidate and business expectations aren’t aligned. And to that end, it often stems from businesses believing once they’ve hired someone their problems are solved.  However, when the right person with the right skillset is in the right place. And when businesses understand that person can help them solve the problem once there is a strategy and processes in place, then the two are more efficiently aligned.  WHERE TO LOOK FOR ADVANCED ANALYTICS & INSIGHT ROLES If you’re a candidate and have five years or more experience in the Analytics industry, there is a huge growth in demand from EdTech and TeleHealth enterprises. As businesses have gone online and virtual, it’s important to have someone in place who can navigate the changing nature of education and medicine within the Data & Analytics field. One of the key ingredients businesses hunger for are candidates who can blend statistical analysis with the communication skills. For businesses, candidates want to grow with the business and have the opportunity to make an impact. In our recently released 2020 Salary Guide we discuss each specialism; what’s working, what isn’t, and how businesses can hire and retain top talent to keep their projects on track and their businesses running smoothly. If you’re interested in Data and Technology, Risk or Digital Analytics, Life Science Analytics, Marketing and Insight, Data Science, or Computer Vision, we invite you to check out our current vacancies. If you’d like to learn more, contact one of our expert consultant. For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Five Ways Marketing Analytics Help Businesses Plan For The Future

Small business. Big business. From Amazon to Zoe’s Restaurant, everyone has taken a hit during the pandemic. Some are closed indefinitely while some have been retrofitted to make masks, ventilators, or have even become makeshift labs to find a vaccine or a cure for the coronavirus. But what’s one thing all these businesses have in common? The need for marketing.  We’ve all had emails assuring us our favorite business is doing their part to flatten the curve. Others might explain they’re refocusing or redoubling their efforts to support front line workers, but they’ll return to business when they can, and small enterprises? Every sale is a bonus for them as they struggle to make ends meet and stay in business.  So, what are some ways that Marketing Analytics are helping these businesses both big and small plan for the future? They’re making use of marketing analytics. Shift Strategies. Build Community. It’s a virtual business world, but that doesn’t mean you should stop marketing, or that your customers aren’t still around. By showing you care about your customers whether it’s taking steps to sanitize surfaces or offering high-value content.  By shifting strategies from outbound to inbound, it’s giving your customers a chance to window shop, browse, and consider before buying. Whether they’re having to be cautious about their finances or not, how you present yourself to them, keeps them around for the long haul.  Being there for your customers shows them you appreciate them and care about them. And that you’re not just about the sale. This is the virtual handshake which keeps your customers coming back and gives them something to look forward to in the future.  Show Support. Express Solidarity. This is for both your employees and your customers. When you show support and express solidarity from within your company, it speaks volumes to your customers.  These are trying times for everyone, if you must close your doors, be clear in your communications. Be honest and explain what’s happening, if and when you hope or expect to resume operations, and stay positive.  Niche Market Analysis Determine who your customers are and how they might react in times like these. How they react can determine what you do next and how you do it for your business? As much as you should have an overview of your demographics, it’s also important to take a deeper dive. Knowing this information can help you plan the most effective marketing strategy for the future of your business. This kind of raw Data offers a wealth of information and resources to help you best analyze your information.  Gather Data. Track. Analyze. This can help you get an overview of what’s working, what isn’t, and how you can pivot based on your customer’s needs. This time is an opportunity to assess, reassess, and pivot if needed to determine what works best for you and your customers. From here, you can refine your strategies, get creative in your ideas, test, and track.   Remember, Marketing is a process. Marketing is a long game. Have patience. Be consistent.  While the fruits of your labors may not be immediately felt, customers may feel of a sense of normalcy knowing you’re with them during this pandemic. Everyone’s in the same boat. We’re all in this together. Whether you’re a business on the front lines or have to close your doors for a while, using these strategies help not only your customers have something to look forward to, but you as well. As business processes have continue to shift online, looking for your next job has become more daunting than ever before. But here’s the good news. Leaders, Hiring Managers, recruiters, and prospective employees are all navigating a new way of doing business and finding talent to keep those businesses running.  In the wake of work-from-home policies, remote working, and the shifting landscape of working outside the office, technology careers are prime opportunities to both gain increased knowledge in your chosen field or begin your career path.  If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics professional opportunities, check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.   For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com

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