Privacy Notice for Employees



Harnham Search and Selection Limited

Privacy Notice – Employees, Contractors and Workers

1.                 This Notice

1.1              We take the privacy and security of our staff’s personal information seriously. This notice explains our practices regarding the collection, use and disclosure of personal information we hold about employees, contractors and workers and applicants for roles with us.

1.2              This notice applies to all current and former employees, contractors and workers (“you”) of Harnham Search and Selection Limited (“we” or “us”).

1.3              This privacy notice does not apply to information we hold in relation to our candidates for roles with our clients, clients or third parties which is covered by a separate privacy notice available on our website.

1.4              This notice does not form part of any contract of employment or other contract to provide services. We may update this notice at any time.

1.5              This notice is governed by the EU General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) from 25 May 2018.

1.6              This notice applies to personal data we hold about you. “personal data” means information that relates to you as an identified or identifiable person.  

2.                 Legal basis on which we process personal data

2.1              Personal data we hold about you will be lawfully processed based on one of the following legal reasons (known as a “legal basis”):

2.1.1         Because you have consented to the processing;

2.1.2         Because the processing is necessary in order for us to comply with our obligations under a contract between you and us; or

2.1.3         Because the processing is necessary for a “legitimate interest”, a legitimate interest in this context means a valid interest we have as your employer which is not overridden by your interests in data privacy and security.

3.                 Data which we collect

3.1              We may collect and process the following personal data about you:

3.1.1         Personal contact details such as name, title, addresses, telephone numbers, and personal email addresses.

3.1.2         Date of birth

3.1.3         Gender

3.1.4         Marital status and dependants

3.1.5         Next of kin and emergency contact information

3.1.6         National Insurance number

3.1.7         Bank account details, payroll records and tax status information

3.1.8         Salary, annual leave, pension and benefits information

3.1.9         Start date

3.1.10      Location of employment or workplace

3.1.11      Copy of your passport

3.1.12      Recruitment information (including copies of right to work documentation, references and other information included in a CV or cover letter or as part of the application process)

3.1.13      Employment records (including job titles, work history, working hours, training records and professional memberships)

3.1.14      Compensation history

3.1.15      Performance information

3.1.16      Disciplinary and grievance information

3.1.17      CCTV footage, and other information obtained through electronic means such as swipecard records

3.1.18      Information about your use of our information and communications systems

3.1.19      Photographs.

3.2              We may also collect, store and use the following "special categories" of more sensitive personal information:

3.2.1         Information about your race or ethnicity, religious beliefs, sexual orientation and political opinions

3.2.2         Information about your health, including any medical condition, health and sickness records.

3.2.3         Information about criminal convictions and offences.

4.                 How we collect your data

4.1              We collect personal information about employees, workers and contactors through the application and recruitment process, either directly from candidates or sometimes from an employment agency or background check provider.

4.2              We may sometimes collect additional information from third parties including former employers, credit reference agencies or other background check agencies

4.3              We will collect additional personal information in the course of job-related activities throughout the period of you working for us.

4.4              From time to time we may collect sensitive data via a hard copy or online diversity monitoring form if we do so then we will seek to obtain your consent for processing this data.  

5.                 How we use your personal data

5.1              We may use your information to:

5.1.1         Making a decision about your recruitment or appointment

5.1.2         Determining the terms on which you work for us

5.1.3         Checking you are legally entitled to work in the UK

5.1.4         Paying you and, if you are an employee, deducting tax and National Insurance contributions

5.1.5         Providing employment benefits to you

5.1.6         Liaising with your pension provider if necessary

5.1.7         Administering the contract we have entered into with you

5.1.8         Business management and planning, including accounting and auditing

5.1.9         Conducting performance reviews, managing performance and determining performance requirements

5.1.10      Making decisions about salary reviews and compensation

5.1.11      Assessing qualifications for a particular job or task, including decisions about promotions

5.1.12      Gathering evidence for possible grievance or disciplinary hearings

5.1.13      Making decisions about your continued employment or engagement

5.1.14      Making arrangements for the termination of our working relationship

5.1.15      Education, training and development requirements

5.1.16      Dealing with legal disputes involving you, or other employees, workers and contractors, including accidents at work

5.1.17      Ascertaining your fitness to work

5.1.18      Managing sickness absence

5.1.19      Complying with health and safety obligations

5.1.20      To prevent fraud

5.1.21      To monitor your use of our information and communication systems to ensure compliance with our IT policies

5.1.22      To ensure network and information security, including preventing unauthorised access to our computer and electronic communications systems and preventing malicious software distribution

5.1.23      To conduct data analytics studies to review and better understand employee retention and attrition rates

5.1.24      Equal opportunities monitoring

5.2              Each type of processing listed above is based on our legitimate interest and the performance of our contract with you. These grounds for processing will overlap and there may be several grounds which justify our use of your personal information.

5.3              If you fail to provide certain information when requested, we may not be able to perform the contract we have entered into with you (such as paying you or providing a benefit), or we may be prevented from complying with our legal obligations (such as to ensure the health and safety of our workers).

6.                 Sensitive Data

6.1              Under the GDPR certain "special categories" of particularly sensitive personal information require higher levels of protection. We need to have further justification for collecting, storing and using this type of personal information. We may process special categories of personal information in the following circumstances:

6.1.1         In limited circumstances, with your explicit written consent.

6.1.2         Where we need to carry out our legal obligations and in line with our data protection policy.

6.1.3         Where it is needed in the public interest, such as for equal opportunities monitoring or in relation to a pension scheme, and in line with our data protection policy.

6.1.4         Where it is needed to assess your working capacity on health grounds, subject to appropriate confidentiality safeguards.

6.1.5         We may collect information about criminal convictions if it is appropriate given the nature of the role and where we are legally able to do so.

6.2              Less commonly, we may process this type of information where it is needed in relation to legal claims or where it is needed to protect your interests (or someone else's interests) and you are not capable of giving your consent, or where you have already made the information public.

6.3              We will use your particularly sensitive personal information in the following ways:

6.3.1         We will use information relating to leaves of absence, which may include sickness absence or family related leaves, to comply with employment and other laws.

6.3.2         We will use information about your physical or mental health, or disability status, to ensure your health and safety in the workplace and to assess your fitness to work, to provide appropriate workplace adjustments, to monitor and manage sickness absence and to administer benefits.

6.3.3         We will use information about your race or national or ethnic origin, religious, philosophical or moral beliefs, or your gender identification or sexual orientation, to ensure meaningful equal opportunity monitoring and reporting.

6.4              We do not need your consent if we use special categories of your personal information in accordance with our written policy to carry out our legal obligations or exercise specific rights in the field of employment law.

6.5              In some circumstances, we may approach you for your written consent to allow us to process certain particularly sensitive data (for instance for diversity monitoring purposes). If we do so, we will provide you with full details of the information that we would like and the reason we need it, so that you can carefully consider whether you wish to consent. You should be aware that it is not a condition of your contract with us that you agree to any request for consent from us.

7.                 Sharing your information

7.1              We will share your personal information with third parties where required by law, where it is necessary to administer the working relationship with you or where we have another legitimate interest in doing so.

7.2              We may share your information with certain suppliers or other group companies who are assisting us with human resources, the management of employee benefits or payroll services. We may also share your information with other group companies for general management purposes.

7.3              All our third-party service providers and other entities in the group are required to take appropriate security measures to protect your personal information in line with our policies. We do not allow our third-party service providers to use your personal data for their own purposes. We only permit them to process your personal data for specified purposes and in accordance with our instructions.

7.4              We may also share your information:

7.4.1         if we are under a duty to disclose or share your personal data in order to comply with any legal obligation (for example, if required to do so by a court order or for the purposes of prevention of fraud or other crime);

7.4.2         we may transfer your personal information to a third party as part of a sale of some or all of our business and assets to any third party or as part of any business restructuring or reorganisation, but we will take steps with the aim of ensuring that your privacy rights continue to be protected;

7.4.3         to protect our rights, property and safety, or the rights, property and safety of our users or any other third parties.

7.5              Other than as set out above, we will not disclose any of your personal information unless you give us permission to do so. If we do supply your personal information to a third party we will take steps to ensure that your privacy rights are protected and that third party complies with the terms of this notice.

8.                 Security

8.1              We will take all reasonable steps to ensure that appropriate technical and organisational measures are carried out in order to safeguard the information we collect from you and protect against unlawful access and accidental loss or damage. These measures may include (as necessary):

8.1.1         protecting our servers by both hardware and software firewalls;

8.1.2         locating our data processing storage facilities in secure locations;

8.1.3         encrypting all data stored on our server with an industry standard encryption method that encrypts the data between your computer and our server so that in the event of your network being insecure no data is passed in a format that could easily be deciphered;

8.1.4         when necessary, disposing of or deleting your data so it is done so securely;

8.1.5         regularly backing up and encrypting all data we hold.

8.2              We will ensure that our staff are aware of their privacy and data security obligations. We will take reasonable steps to ensure that the employees of third parties working on our behalf are aware of their privacy and data security obligations.

8.3              This notice and our procedures for handling personal data will be reviewed as necessary.

9.                 Data Retention

9.1              Our current data retention policy is to delete or destroy (to the extent we are able to) the personal data we hold about you in accordance with the following:

Category of personal data

Length of retention

Health and safety records (e.g. an accident book) being held at our premises

10 years from the date on which the relevant information was collected.

Records relevant for tax purposes including records of pay and benefits

8 years from the end of the financial year to which the records relate.

Applicant records (where no employment or engagement has resulted)

2 years from the date of your interview with us

Records relating to human resources

7 years from the end of your employment with us

Records relating to pensions

7 years from the end of your employment with us in the case of personal pension records 80 years from the end of your employment with us in the case of occupational pension records

 

9.2              For any category of personal data not specifically defined in this Notice, and unless otherwise specified by applicable law, the required retention period for any personal data will be deemed to be 7 years from the date of receipt by us of that data.

9.3              The retention periods stated in this Notice can be prolonged or shortened as may be required (for example, in the event that legal proceedings apply to the data or if there is an on-going investigation into the data).

9.4              We review the personal data (and the categories of personal data) we are holding on a regular basis to ensure the data we are holding is still relevant to our business and is accurate. If we discover that certain data we are holding is no longer necessary or accurate, we will take reasonable steps to correct or delete this data as may be required.

9.5              If you wish to request that data we hold about you is amended or deleted, please refer to clause 10 below, which explains your privacy rights.

10.              Your privacy rights

10.1           The GDPR gives you the following rights in respect of personal data we hold about you:

The right to be informed

You have a right to know about our personal data protection and data processing activities, details of which are contained in this notice.

The right of access

You can make what is known as a Subject Access Request (“SAR”) to request information about the personal data we hold about you (free of charge, save for reasonable expenses for repeat requests). If you wish to make a SAR please contact us as described below.

The right to correction

Please inform us if information we hold about you is incomplete or inaccurate in any way and we will update our records as soon as possible, but in any event within one month.

We will take reasonable steps to communicate the change to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

The right to erasure (the ‘right to be forgotten’)

You may ask us to delete or remove personal data if there is no good reason for us continuing to process it. You also have the right to ask us to delete or remove your personal data where you have successfully exercised your right to object to processing (see below), if we may have processed your information unlawfully or if we are required to delete your personal data to comply with local law.

The data may continue to exist in backup form, but we will take steps to ensure that it will not be accessible.

We will communicate the erasure to any third parties to whom we have passed the same information.

We may not always be able to comply with your request of erasure for specific legal reasons which will be notified to you, if applicable, at the time of your request.

The right to restrict processing

You can request that we no longer process your personal data in certain ways, whilst not requiring us to the delete the same data.

The right to data portability

You have right to receive copies of personal data we hold about you in a commonly used and easily storable format (please let us know a format which suits you). You may also request that we transfer your personal data directly to third party (where technically possible).

The right to object

Unless we have overriding legitimate grounds for such processing, you may object to us using your personal data if you feel your fundamental rights and freedoms are impacted. You may also object if we use your personal data for direct marketing purposes (including profiling) or for research or statistical purposes. Please notify your objection to us and we will gladly cease such processing, unless we have overriding legitimate grounds.

Rights with respect to automated decision-making and profiling

You have a right not to be subject to automated decision-making (including profiling) when those decisions have a legal (or similarly significant effect) on you. You are not entitled to this right when the automated processing is necessary for us to perform our obligations under a contract with you, it is permitted by law, or if you have given your explicit consent.

Right to withdraw consent

If we are relying on your consent as the basis on which we are processing your personal data, you have the right to withdraw your consent at any time. Even if you have not expressly given your consent to our processing, you also have the right to object (see above).

 

10.2           All SARs and other requests or notifications in respect of your above rights must be sent to us in writing to Marion van Vlierden, Harnham Search and Selection Limited, 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon, London, England, SW19 7QW, dataprotection@harnham.com.

10.3           We will endeavour to comply with such requests as soon as possible but in any event we will comply within one month of receipt (unless a longer period of time to respond is reasonable by virtue of the complexity or number of your requests).

11.              Data Breaches

11.1           If personal data we hold about you is subject to a breach or unauthorised disclosure or access, we will report this to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) and/or our Legal and Compliance Manager.

11.2           If a breach is likely to result in a risk to your data rights and freedoms, we will notify you as soon as possible.

12.              Transferring your information outside Europe

12.1           We do not expect to transfer your personal data outside of the EEA. However there may be circumstances in which we need to do so (for instance if our servers are based outside of the EEA or if your work is international in nature).

12.2           We may transfer your personal data to group companies who are outside of the EEA but if we do so we will ensure that the group companies have entered into a binding agreement with us to secure your rights in relation to the data.

12.3           If we transfer your information outside of the EEA, and the third country or international organisation in question has not been deemed by the EU Commission to have adequate data protection laws, we will provide appropriate safeguards and your privacy rights will continue to be enforceable against us as outlined in this notice.

13.              Contact us

13.1           If at any time you would like to contact us with your views about our privacy practices, or with any enquiry or complaint relating to your personal information or how it is handled, you can do so via the following email address Marion van Vlierden, dataprotection@harnham.com.

 

If we are unable to resolve any issues you may have or you would like to make a further complaint, you can contact the Information Commissioner’s Office by visiting http://www.ico.org.uk/ for further assistance.

 

How to lead a Data team

How To Lead A Data Team

Dream teams from sports to business are an ideal everyone aspires to live up to. But what is it every basketball or football dynasty has which makes them a dream team? What is it that brings individuals together to overcome odds, set examples, find solutions, and create the next best thing? Good management.  The need for good management is no different in the Data Science world. Yet according to our latest Salary Guide, poor management is one of the top five reasons Data professionals leave companies. So, let’s take a look at what poor management is, what causes it, and how businesses can better retain Data talent. What’s Your Data Science Strategy? Most businesses know they need a Data team. They may also assume that a Data Scientist who performed well can lead a Data team. But that isn’t necessarily the case. Managers have to know things like P&L statements, how to build a business case, make market assessments, and how to deal with people. And that’s just for a start.  The leader of a Data team has a number of other factors to consider as well such as Data Governance, MDM, compliance, legal issues around the use of algorithms, and the list goes on. At the same time, they also need to be managing their team with trust, authenticity, and candor. The list of responsibilities can be daunting and if someone is given too much too soon and without support, it can be a recipe for disaster. Other businesses might believe that a top performing Data Scientist would make a good manager. Yet these are two different fields. Or you might look at it this way. If you are willing to upskill a top performing Data professional and train them in managerial skills, giving them the education and support they need, that is one solution. Another solution is to create a Data Science strategy which brings in people with business backgrounds. Data Science is a diverse field and people come from a number of backgrounds not just Computer Science or Biostatistics, for example.  Now that you’ve seen what might cause a manager to fail, let’s take a look at a few tips to help you succeed. Seven Tips for Managing a Data Team Managing a team is about being able to hire, retain, and develop great talent. But if the manager has no management training, well, that’s how things tend to fall apart. Here a few tips to consider to help ensure you and your team work together to become the dream team of your organization: Build trust by caring about your team. Help define their role within the organization. Ensure projects are exciting and that they’re not being asked to do project with vague guidelines or unrealistic timeframes.Be open and candid. Remember, Data Scientists are trained in how to gather, collect, and analyze information. If anyone can see right through a façade, it will be these Data professionals. Have those “tough” conversations throughout every stage of the hiring, onboarding, and day-to-day, so that no one is caught unaware.Offer consistent feedback. And ask for it for yourself as well from your team.Ensure your team understands the business goals behind their projects. Let them in on the bigger picture. Think long-term recruitment for a permanent role, not short-term. If you have an urgent project, consider contracting it out. Prioritize diversity to include academic discipline and professional experience. Does the way this person view the world expand the knowledge of your team’s knowledge? Dream teams don’t always have to agree. Sometimes, the best solutions are found when there are other opinions. Finding the perfect, “Full Stack” Data Scientist or Data Engineer or Analyst is not impossible, and retaining them can be even easier. If you’ve done your job well, your team will trust you, have a balanced skillset, and understand how their work supports the organization and its goals. For more information on how to be a great manager, check out this article from HBR.  Ready for the next step?  Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more. For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Battle Royale: Computational Biologists Vs Machine Learning Engineers

Battle Royale: Computational Biologists vs Machine Learning Engineers

From the first genome sequencing in the second revolution to Life Science Analytics as a growing field in the fourth industrial revolution, change has been both welcomed and fraught with fear. Everyone worries about robots, Artificial Intelligence, and in some cases even professionals who have stayed current by keeping up-to-date with trends. And it’s beginning to affect not only “office politics” within the tech space, but even interviewer and interviewee relationships. We’ve seen a growing trend of apprehension between Computational Biologists and Machine Learning Engineers. What could be the cause? Aren’t they each working toward a common goal? It seems the answer isn’t quite so cut and dry as we’d like it to be. Here are some thoughts on what could be driving this animosity. But first, a bit of background. So, What’s the Difference? Computational Biology and Machine Learning are two sides of the same coin; one sets the framework and the other applies what’s been learned. Both use statistical and computational methods to construct models from existing databases to create new Data. However, it is within the framework of biomedical problems as computational problems, that there seems to be a bit of a breakdown. It’s one thing to have all the information and all the Data, but its quite another to know how the Data might interact or affect the health and medications of people seeking help. This is the job of those in Life Science Analytics. Determine through Data what needs to be done, quickly, and efficiently, but at the same time, ensure the human element is still active.  A few examples of Computational Biology include concentrations, sequences, images and are used in such areas as Algorithmics, Robotics, and Machine Learning. The job of Machine Learning can help to classify spam emails, recognize human speech, and more. Here’s a good place to start if you’d like to take a deeper dive into the differences between the two or read this article about mindsets and misconceptions. Office Politics in the Tech Space Circling back to the concern between Computational Biologists and Data Scientists with a focus on Machine Learning. The latest around the water cooler within the tech space is that those with a biological background who understand Machine Learning are looked upon as dangerous to the status quo.  But, as many of our candidates know, it’s important to stay on the cutting edge and if that means, upskilling in Machine Learning so you have both the human element as well as the mathematical, robotic components, then that is more marketable than just having one or the other. The learning curve in biology training within the Life Sciences Analytics space means Computational Biologist with a Machine Learning skillset is best able to apply Data Science and computer science tools to more organic and biological datasets. Someone with just a computer science background may not have the depth of knowledge to understand how these models, systems, and data affect and impact medicine. Computational Biologists who are trained simultaneously in computer science and biology, and are a little heavier on the biology side, see Machine Learning Engineers as a threat because utilizing Machine Learning and other cutting-edge tools could mean their job is on the line. They worry their job will fall by the wayside. That when somebody proves Machine Learning is faster and more efficient the impetus might be why hire a Computational Biologist when a Machine Learning engineer will do? It’s like when a lot of people joke about how robots are going to take over the world and everybody will be out of a job. I think the worry with some folks on the Computational Biology side is that maybe they just aren’t up to date with their training or haven’t kept up with cutting edge of technology. With a Recruiter’s Eye While what I’ve seen agrees that, yes, Machine Learning is incredibly helpful and fast and you can get through so much more data. But its still that understanding of biology and chemistry that you will need because you need to be able to understand, for example, how these proteins are going to be reacting with one another or you need to understand how DNA and R&A work, how best to analyze, and what analyzing those things means. On the other hand, just because you know, “oh, this reaction comes out of it”, if you don’t know why that is or how that could impact a drug or a person, then you don’t really have anything to go on. There’s a caveat there. Though there may be concerns among Computational Biologists and Machine Learning Engineers, at both the upper and entry levels, it’s still the technical lead who will say, “we really do need somebody with a biological background because if we get all this Data and don’t really know what to do with it, then we’ll need to hire a Project Manager to converse between the two and that’s an inefficient use of time and resources”. What I hear most often is a company wants a Computational Biologist but they also want someone who knows Machine Learning. But they don’t want to compromise on either because they don’t understand there are limitations to things. We all want the unicorn employee, but we can’t make them fit into a box with too specific parameters. It’s a Fact of Life Any job, whether it’s in the tech industry, the food industry, Ad Optimization, or even recruitment, uses Machine Learning in one way or another. Yet compared to spaces which work on sequencing the human genome, it's amazing to see how far things have come. It used to take days to process DNA. Now you can spit in a tube and send it off to 23andMe to learn a little about your health. That’s what Machine Learning enables people to do. But it doesn’t mean Computational Biologists are going to fall by the wayside. It means there will be times you’ll have to liaise more between the two groups. It means you’ll be more marketable by adding Machine Learning to the work you’re already doing or taking some classes in Computational Science, for example, to keep your skills up to date. It’s a Transparency Issue Ultimately, it seems the heart of this apprehension comes down to a transparency issue. For example, let’s say companies begin to bring in AI people and suddenly the staff already in place begins to get worried about the security of their jobs. Even in an industry tense with skills gaps, the fear still abounds. In coming back to speak with the Hiring Manager, it became clear the animosity is even more prevalent than first imagined. So, it’s important to get input from within the company and develop a unified story, a unified message across departments, and especially within the Life Science Analytics and Data Science teams as well. In other words, “keep people in the loop.” If it’s happening to this company, it seems other companies may be facing this same issue. However, it’s not going away and is creating a kind of competition between the old guard and the up-and-coming startups. For example, any new company is going to want to integrate AI and will be asking the question how best to integrate it into their structure. They might also ask how best to optimize the ads coming through AI. This is just another way of how companies are catching up, but also how people are catching up to the companies.  Technology is coming whether you like it or not. So, if you want to stay marketable and work on really interesting projects, there’s always going to be the challenge of staying up-to-date and different companies attack this in different ways.  Stay open minded, keep an eye and an ear out for ways to stay on top of your game. Even just taking a few minutes to watch a YouTube video, listen to a TedTalk or a podcast, so you can talk about it and be informed. These are some really simple ways to stay on the cutting edge and help you figure out where you can grow and improve for better opportunities. Ready for the next step? Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more. For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Data Engineers: The Workers Behind the Curtain

We’re halfway through the year and our salary guide is out. If you wonder where you are, where you’re going, and if you’re a business, how you’re going to get there. Well, then, you’ve come to the right place. Articles have touted Data Scientists as the “rock stars” of the 21st century, but even rock stars need their managers and roadies. Who else will build the stage and plan the tour? And in the world of data, it all begins with the Data Engineer, laying the groundwork, the foundation, and the framework. These are the stars behind the scenes who make it possible for Data and Data Scientists to be front and center. Send a Data Engineer Over As prevalent as Data has become in our lives and as its importance grows, there remains the challenge of Data Management. If you don’t know why something is built or how to navigate the structure, the Data you do receive may not make much sense. Your guide in this journey is the Data Engineer, one of the most important pieces of your Data Management puzzle.  These highly skilled and sought-after professionals should not be confused with a Software Engineer, though some elements may be transferable between the two. The building blocks to put massive amounts of Data into a scalable system both reliable and secure takes a unique set of skills.  Humans at the Helm as Skills Shift  As much as we depend on Data today to help determine actionable insights for our business and as much as we hear about the rise of machines in the form of Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning, it is ultimately humans who are at the helm.  It is the people behind the curtain of Data who will build it, run it, and make it work. It is also people who are typically the biggest costs in a project. Finding the balance and ideal candidate, the right person with the right skills for the job, is critical to success. And if you’re starting from the ground up, Data Engineers who can work with the core tools of databases and Spark, for example, will see their opportunities grow.  In our Salary Guide for 2019, we learned one of the skills most sought after by companies today is knowing AWS/Azure and moving Data Lakes into the Cloud. Small businesses and startups are moving to the Cloud to help them scale their Data, but someone still needs to lay the groundwork, whether it’s for the small business or the public cloud providers. Data Engineers are in high demand and it doesn’t look as though things will be slowing down anytime soon. The field is slick with potential. The Time Has Come for Transparency Data is binary gold and, with enough of it, you can read or estimate the mind of your customer or you can wreak havoc on someone’s life. Just a year ago, the European Union put into place rules and regulations as well as financial consequences for poor Data Governance under the General Data and Protections Regulation Act (GDPR). Though the U.S. doesn’t yet have a similar law, there are still plenty of mandates to be aware of by states, unions, and countries.  One Final Thought As roles and technology evolves, it’s important for businesses, employees, and stakeholders to evolve as well. Whether that means making sure to implement practices for Data transparency or upskilling and reskilling your workforce to keep up or simply knowing the trends of forward-thinking companies to scale your own business. Data fuels digital innovation and organizations who are prepared to find solutions will benefit. Want to know what else is trending in big data? Here are a few trends in Big Data forward-looking organizations should look out for in this year and toward the next. Are you a business who knows you’re ready to scale up and hire a Data professional? We have a strong candidate pool and may have just the person you need to fill your role. Are you a candidate looking for a role in Big Data & Analytics? We specialize in junior and senior roles. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

A Data Engineer is a Unique Blend of Data Professional

From startup and small business to large enterprises, each type of business requires a unique blend of Data professional. Though in today’s world, much of the Data being gathered, catalogued, and analyzed happens both in the Cloud and on a hard drive, each type of business has a different need, budget, goals, and objectives. But there is one thing each and every business will have in common. At the heart of the Data team will be a Data Engineer. The Three Main Roles of a Data Engineer This is an analytics role in high demand. It is a growing and lucrative field with steps and stages for nearly every level of business and education experience. For example, a Data Scientist interested in stepping into a Data Engineer role might begin as a Generalist. In all, there are three main roles for each level and type of business – Generalist, Pipeline-Centric, and Data-Centric. Let’s take a quick look at each of the roles with an eye toward the type of person who might be the best fit: Generalist – Most often found on a small team, this type of Data Engineer is most likely the only Data-focused person in the company. They may have to do everything from build the system to analyze it, and while it carries its own unique set of skills, it doesn’t require heavy architecture knowledge as smaller companies may not yet be focusing on scale. In a nutshell, this might be a good entry point for a Data Scientist interested in upskilling and reskilling themselves to transition into a Data Engineering role.Pipeline-centric – This focus requires more in-depth knowledge working with more complex Data science needs. This type of role is found more often in mid-sized companies as they grow and incorporate a team of Data professionals to help analyze and offer actionable insight for the business. In a nutshell, this role creates a useful format for analysts to gather, collect, and analyze each bit of Data at each stage of development.Database-centric – This role is found most often in larger companies and deals not only with Data warehouses, but is focused on setting up analytics databases. Though there are some elements of the pipeline, this is more fine-tuned. In a nutshell, this role deals with many analysts across a wide distribution of databases. A Fine Balance Between Technical Skills, Soft Skills, and Business Acumen While it’s important for anyone filing this role to have deep knowledge of database design as well as a variety of programming languages, its equally important to understand company objectives. In other words, once the groundwork is laid and the datasets established, it’ll be important to explain what it is the business executives need to know to make the best decisions for their business.  Knowing how and what to communicate to executives, stakeholders, and your Data team also means understanding how to best retrieve and optimize the information for reporting. Depending on your organization’s size, you may need both a Data Analyst or Scientist and a Data Engineer. Though this is less likely in medium and larger enterprises. On the flip side, in order to understand the business’ needs, you’ll also need to be good at creating reliable pipelines, architecting systems and Data stores, and collaborating with your Data Science team to build the right solutions. Each of these skills are meant to help you understand concepts to build real-world systems no matter the size of your business. One Final Thought… Do you like to build things? Tweak systems? Take things apart and see how they work, then put them back together better and more efficient than before? Then Data Engineering might be for you. Are you a business who knows you’re ready to scale up and hire a Data professional? We have a strong candidate pool and may have just the person you need to fill your role. Are you a candidate looking for a role in big Data and analytics? We specialize in junior and senior roles. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.