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With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

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Reflections On The Watermark Conference For Women

This week I was fortunate enough to head down to the Watermark Conference for Women alongside our SVP, Stephanie Brooks. As we enter 2020 and women continue to shatter glass ceilings, Harnham firmly believe in a proactive approach towards placing more women in Data & Tech roles.  Diversity and inclusion are integral to our story and core beliefs and we strive to continually re-evaluate how we create measurable change in the marketplace and redefine the metrics of successful and excellent recruitment. For us, attending the conference was a chance to meet and learn from some of those women who are leading the way. Every talk inspired me in some way but there were a couple I really connected with, and I wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on how they impact the work we do at Harnham. WHAT IS WATER? One talk that struck a chord with me was Seth Godin’s breakfast keynote, inspired by a commencement speech by David Foster Wallace in which he famously tells a story of two fish out at sea. The story goes: “There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says ‘Morning, boys. How’s the water?’ And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes ‘What the hell is water?’”. Godin’s speech was meditated on how attitudes and beliefs are the indicators of future success. In his speech, Godin echoed Wallace’s sentiment that “freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in a myriad of ways every day.” Recruitment is an industry where it is easy to swim along without questioning what water or recruitment really is. To question what is water - what is recruitment - requires thoughtful analysis, careful consideration, and of course, “attention, awareness, and discipline”. As the global leaders of Data & Analytics recruitment, we remind ourselves daily that we are responsible for making meaningful change. Water is, to us, what we make of it.  For Seth, his water is marketing. For Harnham, our water is recruitment and we stand by Wallace’s challenge to stay conscious and alive in our jobs. Day in and day out Harnham will continue to make the case for agency recruitment to be diverse and inclusive, as this is in the best economic interest of our clients.   THE ECONOMY OF DIVERSITY One of the most insightful and compelling moments of the day was a conversation between Pat Mitcheel and Indra Nooyi, the former chair and CEO of PepsiCo. Having directed the company’s global strategy for more than a decade, Nooyi is uniquely poised to discuss the importance and power of having women in every capacity within an organization.  During the conversation, she highlighted the statistics that measure the success companies achieve when women have equal representation at all levels. Currently, gender parity exists in entry-level positions but is absent in the 2nd and 3rd tiers of the workforce. While Nooyi highlighted that having a diverse and inclusive workplace should be an integral part of every company’s corporate social responsibility, she argued that this also leads to unprecedented economic growth. This aligns closely with our view of Diversity at Harnham, something which we examined in more detail in our Diversity Report.  For Nooyi, in making the case for the economics of diversity, she used the work of care economists to show how implementing policies that affected the unique interests of women are proven to not only keep women in the workforce and draw them back to work after children but are also shown to increase the economic output of countries. Institutional change at the corporate level and policies focused on those who have care-giving responsibilities have been shown to positively influence economic growth and increase the happiness and productivity of workers.  BREAKING OUT  As a woman working in a fast-paced and competitive environment, I also took a number of insights from the various break-out sessions held throughout the day. Here are a few highlights:  Women Breaking Barriers: Michelle P. King, Andrea McBride John, Pat Mitchell, Samantha Rapoport Find a mentor, be a mentor. Find a sponsor, be a sponsor. Find a sister, be a sister.Take up space and own it Share your successes with the women and men around you Building a Network of Relationships, Not Just Contacts: Laura Okmin Focus on asking people who they are, not what they do Reach out when you don’t need anything, maintain relationships  The Myth of the Nice Girl Nice people build  trust, trust is the foundation of all business relationships You don’t have to choose between kindness and strength If you want to break glass ceilings, we may have an opportunity for you. Take a look at our latest roles or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com. For our Mid-West and East Coast Team, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. 

Surprising Job Search Trends in the Data Industry

One of the things I like to most is to meet our candidates face-to-face. Because most them are local, it’s simple. We call them in and the traditional interview process begins. But, sometimes, the best person for the job or the clients themselves aren’t local.  Enter Zoom or Skype or any such communication method where you can see the person you’re talking to. While it’s a step in the right direction, it’s not the complete step. Why? Because you can’t pick up on those subtle clues you might miss, if the meeting isn’t in person.  Going The Extra Mile for the Right Placement One of my colleagues recently shared a story with me. She’d been working with a candidate via Zoom for a placement in another State. Though the candidate and the client were both in the area, she wasn’t. The communication with the prospective candidate felt right, but she just wasn’t sure. To ensure she was making the right placement, she traveled to meet them. She wanted to meet the candidate to get a better understanding of him before she was able to successfully place him.  Fortunately, it wasn't on the other side of the country, but, it was definitely something that needed to happen. In today’s hyper-digitized world, it's important to remember that the ability to meet in person is an advantage. From the Client’s Side From an office perspective on the client’s side, an in-person meeting offers further advantages. The client can see how the candidate will interact in the actual environment of their business. A birds’ eye view of how the candidate handles themselves in the cultural atmosphere of the business, if you will.  In sharpening their focus, the client can also see how a candidate’s appearance, point of view, and communication side affect their performance at the interview and beyond. We make these snap judgements without realizing it, but they’re important. And you can’t really get a good idea of the person over the phone or via email as it can occasionally be difficult to read a candidate’s intentions.  At Harnham, we have tried to spearhead the interaction point of view for our own relationships. One of the most unique aspects of our business our dedication to the people we place and our clients we serve. So, navigating data-driven trends with our face-to-face culture finds a distinctive focus as we enter the Age of Data 2.0. A Shift Toward Pipeline Experience  With U.S. office locations in both New York and San Francisco, we have a variety of clients from startups to Fortune 500. So, to say one thing is definite in one place or another is a stretch. But, there is a trend, here in New York for professionals with pipeline experience or Machine Learning model development. On the flip side, a growing trend in the San Francisco market has most of their clientele looking for a Machine Learning Engineer profile within the pipeline development lifecycle. So, while we’re (New York) a little bit behind, it’s a trend I’m seeing on both sides of the spectrum within the last six months or so. Though it’s not exactly the unicorn employee, clients seek, there is shift toward higher level oversight. Someone who will be responsible for the entire pipeline.  Demand remains high for a field still facing a data shortage. Though the U.S. still lags behind the U.K. and Europe, it’s catching up. As businesses focus on their data strategies in the new year, below are a few things to consider before you hire or accept.  Top 3 Questions to Ask Before You Hire From the client’s side determine and the role you want to fill. Ask yourselves the following: What’s the objective of the role you’d like to fill? What is the goal?What contribution do you want from the person in that role?What is your timeline to have that person on board? What happens if you can’t fill the role within your timeline? Top 3 Questions for Mid-to-Senior Level Candidates Did you list the business impact of your list of accomplishments? Can you communicate as easily with your Data team as you do with the Executives? Clients are looking for a mix of technical understanding and the ability to communicate to technical and non-technical audiences. Are your projects keeping you engaged creatively? When was the last time you were given a new initiative, new project, or new client to partner with? If not, then it may be time to search or perhaps consider a contractor role for a fresh perspective. If you’re interested in AI, Big Data or Digital and Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Team, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com. 

The Flu, Snake Bites, And The Coronavirus: Jacob Glanville From Netflix’s ‘Pandemic'

Jacob Glanville features in the new Netflix series ‘Pandemic’, discussing the pioneering progress that he and his team at Distributed Bio have been making in the world of bioengineered medicine. This week we sat down with Jacob Glanville, CEO of Distributed Bio, field leaders in advanced computational immunoengineering of biomedicines. Featuring in the new Netflix series ‘Pandemic’, a look into the teams that are fighting to prevent a global outbreak of disease, Glanville is a highly renowned expert with an incredible track record.  With a PhD from Stanford, and having spent four years as a Principal Scientist at Pfizer, he left to found Distributed Bio. With Sarah Ives, Director of Influenza Centivax at Distributed Bio, the team is developing a new class of universal, utilizing pioneering computational technologies. “We use high throughput computational docking to try to help characterize how many unique epitopes might exist on the surface of a viral coat protein or a pathogen protein. Then, we also use computational methods to identify distinct elements of those diverse members of viral cost proteins from lots of different evolved versions of the same pathogen. And that's the centerpiece of how our vaccine technology works. We co-administer a bunch of really different variants all at a low dose so that only the shared sites are essentially at a high enough dose to be responded to.” This technique allows for Distributed Bio to create vaccines for almost any virus, at a fast pace, and in a safe environment. For example, with the recent outbreak of the SARS-derivative Coronavirus, Glanville is working in collaboration with US military and World Health Organization’s program allows the creation of ‘pseudo-virion’ versions of the disease that can be examined without posing a significant risk: “They take chicken pox, and flow over the outside of the chicken pox, the cost protein of a more serious virus, like the Coronavirus. So it behaves like a Coronavirus and it looks like one on the outside. Like the crunchy M&M shell is, is Coronavirus, but it's got the soft gooey M&M chocolate of, of chickenpox. It's not that dangerous. We are setting up a relationship with [the military] where we could use our antibody discovery library in conjunction with their pseudo-virion particles. We could rapidly discover antibodies against, SARS for instance, without the risk of bringing SARS into our lab.” Their work, however, is not just limited to fighting viral diseases. One of Distributed Bio’s leading projects focuses on creating a universal antivenom to snake bites. With between 80,000 and 130,000 people killed each year by snake bites, the majority of whom live in third-world countries, the need for an easy access and affordable antivenom is high.  “There's around 550 snakes in the world and each one has 20 to 70 proteins. It seems like a huge number of proteins you'd have to target to hit all snakes. But, for me analyzing them, they all collapse down to like 10 different clusters and homologous groups that all snakes share.” Having discovered that a universal approach was both possible and realistic, how did they develop the antibodies needed? “Our team [led by Tim Friede, Director of Herpetology at Distributed Bio, Sawsan Youssef, Chief Science Officer, and Raymond Newland, Principal Scientist.] found a man who spent 17 years injecting himself with snake venom from all over the world, because he loves snakes, and we took his blood. We’ve been using lab methods plus computational methods to help identify a series of antibodies that can hit like a bunch of shared determinants.” But, with a team that comprises of roles varying from Data Engineers and Data Scientists to Bioinformatics specialists, the ability to work together is essential. How does Glanville look to create a collaborative environment?  “I actually try to cross-train people as much as possible. My feeling is, that the extent to which you can actually cross-train people, the less likely you are to encounter a series of like assumption errors. I think what happens is often down to miscommunication between people who are making errors in the cracks where they have both misunderstood what the other person needed and what the previous person was giving them. If people are able to take their colleagues’ expertise into question when they’re working, you've reduced some of that risk.” Having grown up in Guatemala, Glanville is all too aware of the need for easily-available and effective vaccines, particularly as the Western world grows more wary of injections, largely due to the amount of misinformation that is currently circulating. But he understands that these concerns are often down to trust: “It's hard to communicate an epidemiological recommendation to a global population and not make it one sentence. And so, the loudest sentence becomes ‘get no shots’. I'm hoping that a more effective shot makes the story go away. The problem currently with a flu shot is that it still only works half the time. And so people complain about it. I’m hoping that better vaccines and more reasonable communication will cause calmer minds to prevail.” As for any immediate concerns about the impact of the Coronavirus, he once again turns to the issues of accessibility:  “Right now I worry more about Ebola. It's a larger outbreak problem and it's in an area that is poorly served. I think China is pretty good at locking down medical problems.” If you’re looking to build out your team with the industry’s best, get in touch with some of our expert consultants: For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. If you’re on the hunt for your next opportunity and want to join an innovative, world-leading company, we may have a role for you. You can find our latest jobs here. Pandemic is streaming on Netflix now. You can watch the trailer below. 

Dave Farmer Appointed New Harnham CEO

I am pleased to announce that Harnham have named David Farmer as our new CEO.  David has been with Harnham since its inception in 2006 and has most recently being serving as COO. With the new appointment, I will be moving into the position of Executive Chairman.  On the move, David says: “I am thrilled to move into this new position at such an exciting time for the company. Having been with the business since the start, I am well aware of Harnham’s potential, particularly as the Data & Analytics market continues to thrive. We have an extraordinary team of home-grown talent at Harnham and I am eager to see where we can take the business next.”   David understands Harnham better than anyone and has dedicated an incredible amount of time and effort towards the success of the business. I cannot think of anyone better to lead us through the next stage of our growth.  This comes at an exciting time for Harnham with Partners Mark Bremer and Sam Jones stepping up to lead the London and New York offices, respectively. Additionally, long-term team members Ross Henderson and Talitha Boitel-Gill have been named Associate Directors and will oversee the growth of various teams within the UK business.  The global leader in Data & Analytics recruitment, Harnham now comprises of 160 people across four offices globally. 

Harnham Launch 2020 Data & Analytics Salary Survey

Harnham Launch 2020 Data & Analytics Salary Survey

I'm excited to announce the launch of our 9th annual Salary Survey.  Covering salaries, diversity, benefits and technologies, our published Salary Guide is known for reflecting and driving trends within the Data & Analytics industry. As ever, we can't put together our guide without your input, so we are extremely grateful to everyone who is able to take part.  This year, one participant will win a £500 Amazon Voucher (or an equivalent amount in your local currency). You can read all the terms and conditions for this here.  The survey takes around 10 minutes and we would love to hear your thoughts. All submissions are 100% confidential and will only be used to provide an overview of the industry as a whole.  You can choose the survey relevant to you below: UK Survey US Survey EU/EEA Survey In the meantime, you can download a copy of last year's completed Salary Guide here.  We look forward to sharing our latest results with you later in the year. 

HRtech Gets A Mindset Shift In 2020

HRTech Gets a Mindset Shift in 2020

Recent editor picks on LinkedIn highlight how jobs will change in the future. But as changes come, there are a dizzying array of tech advancements, products, and more in the job market landscape.If you’ve been looking through the telescopic lens of the Digital transformation and wonder, what’s next? Well, we may have a role for you. If you’re a business and wonder what’s next, we have some ideas to help you identify, hire, and retain top talent within the Data professional industry. Setting a Mindset Shift We have reached a time in which simply adding the word “tech” to something has shifted. Thinking digitally, or the Digital transformation combines the why with who, how, and which. Who does our technology impact, how will it change how they work, and which advancement is best suited to answer the call?  Below are just a few things to consider when developing your: Recruitment is a process, not a transaction. Interaction instead of reaction.Factor in not only human skills, but machine skills as well.Make employee experience a priority. Experience leads to Data which leads to Insights.Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning have a wider role to play within the recruitment space.Base software selection decisions on user experience. Include everyone who will use the software in both the vendor demonstration and the decision process.Seek references from vendors to foster trust and connect with other organizations.Cloud based solutions far outweigh non-cloud solutions in today’s business climate. These are just a few suggestions to consider as you rethink your HR strategies. Incorporating technology with the human element is a new road for many businesses and essential for the future of work.  Design for Data and Insights Whether you’re talking about the employee experience or the customer journey, it’s important to design the process to generate Data. When you use design thinking, you put people at the center and from there can measure the variables which offer insights into thoughts and feelings. When you know these answers, you can always be improving and optimize for success.  As you consider what to invest in next, remember to think about the Data first. Use your workforce insights to determine the best way to move forward and understand how people impact your business. Measure effectiveness, but understand workforce insights go hand-in-hand with delivery. Rather than operating individually in a separate silo, everything is interconnected, just like in our day-to-day lives. It’s this connectedness which is the greatest shift. From our phones, our iPads, our laptops, and so on, we are able to tap into workforce solutions and find at its center a structurally sound HR strategy to ensure next gen talent is identified, hired, and retained. While we often speak of what you can do to retain your top talent, another focus might be how you communicate with leadership. To ensure everyone is on the same page, it’s important to be sure messaging is consistent across your organization. It’s this messaging along with new systems and strategies in which training and education play an even bigger part than in the past. There’s so much to learn and it comes so fast, that adoption of new technologies must be thought out in advance. Try to avoid chasing the next shiny object or new advancement and have a plan in place for staff and stakeholders to follow. Setting your top priorities now, as we enter a new decade of Data, can help ensure you’re proactive in your business strategy, not reactive. If you’re interested in AI, Big Data and Digital or Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Can The New Decade Bring What The Last Decade Missed?

Can the New Decade Bring What the Last Decade Missed?

GDPR in Europe. State-by-state data privacy laws in the U.S. Online businesses which got their start in dorm rooms and garages have entered every arena including grocery, health, and politics.   Social media habits are no longer in the purview of angsty teens, but are in high demand by corporations; reaching to the highest office in this land. Data infuses every business, day-to-day life, and personal preference, but has it been the grand design imagined at the turn of this century? We can speak with people around the world in real-time, but the internet and the data it gathers has raised a curtain we can hide behind. What had once been intended to unite us, had alienated us instead. As we enter a new decade, it begs the question. Can the new decade bring what the last decade missed? Grand Statements Distract from the Bigger Picture Somewhere between the Y2K scare and the predictions of a digital age, tendrils of the then superhighway began to weave itself into our daily lives. Shouting its pros from the rooftops, and little to nothing of the cons, we became apathetic to our own sensibilities. We put our faith in tech, expecting it to tame the wild side of the possibilities within the internet’s environment. It didn’t. We held grandiose ideals that technology would free us from the daily grind. Allow us to do more. Instead, we hold a computer in our hand and are available 24/7. No rest for the weary. As we attempt to disentangle ourselves, and focus on coordinated efforts to right twenty years of laissez-faire policy, we can look to the Harris Poll Alienation Index. Want to know what people believe and how to help them help themselves? This is a great place to start. Where Do We Fit? Really. Over the last few years, we’ve focused on diversity and inclusion with a focus on those in the Data industry. But beyond race and gender, there’s a wider gap and the Harris Poll strives to help us understand what’s wrong so we can fix it. After all, isn’t this the basis of why we seek Data? To have the information we need to correct a problem? Data is the new oil. Data Scientists are the next rock stars. These statements and similar filled headlines in the second half of the 2010s. While its true, the question is, what does it mean? Well, it depends. Data is a commodity and when it comes to healthcare, social services, food, and housing, it’s important to have the right information. On the flip side, it can be used to skew feelings further to one side or the other. And that can cause bigger problems. So, the question becomes not ‘can the new decade bring what the last decade missed,’ but ‘what should we be asking and where do we fit, really?’ What the Last Decade Missed Without meaning to, the last decade alienated most of us from the powers that be and from each other. In our excitement to connect, we have 5,000 friends or connections, none of whom we know. Slowly, the norm is building to have “offline meetings” once again. Remember when it was the other way around? Our Data isn’t our own and its only been in recent years, major platforms have attempted to listen. Feelings persist of loneliness, anger, and a sense that no one is listening or cares. Driving the wedge further is class and incentivization. We want to belong. But in our most recent digital world, it’s a ‘pay to play’ belonging.  One Final Thought… It may seem as though this has been a disparagement about the digital world. But ultimately, it’s a cautionary tale of the changes which are possible as we enter this new decade. After all, we want to fill the gap the last decade missed and changes are already under way. We have begun to come together much more in the way the digital nation was intended. New startups are paying attention to how people feel and what they want or need. Businesses need soft skills to balance out the technical skills to help with communication across departments and for stakeholders.  Can you talk to a UX Designer or Data Engineer as easily as you can talk to an Executive? Can you take a request from an Executive and explain it to your Data Analyst? It’s this flexibility which remains an important skill to focus on the next decade begins. Are you up for the challenge? If so, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more: For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

How To Make A Mid-Career Move Into Data & Analytics

The world of work has changed and in the world of tech, it’s in a league all its own. While some articles ponder the strange strategy of school and work start and end times, others talk about the hottest jobs on the market. We already know Big Data, Analytics, and anything data-related is the place for aspiring data professionals. Both universities and businesses have amped up their curriculum and offers to help skilled workers keep up with the demand. Skilled workers. These are the people needed to fill the jobs of the future. The jobs automation can’t do, not yet. The jobs which require the human element like why a consumer buys one product or service over another (read: gut instinct). Gut instinct. It’s something developed through our human experiences. But what about those aspiring Data professionals who are coming from other industries and not directly from university. What would someone who wanted to make a mid-career change need to consider before making their move? 11 Things to Consider About Your Mid-Career Change While everyone has different reasons for changing career paths, two of the most common are money and unhappiness. For more about what employees want to remain in their job, check out this year’s Diversity Report. Mid-career changers making the leap into the tech industry plan for a year.  As you plan, think about these questions, and find your why. Then, figure out how. Are you looking for a more challenging role?Looking for advancement opportunities?Do you want more flexibility in your career?Do you just want to move location or do your motivations run deeper?Are you ready to be a student again? Are you willing to “learn the ropes” again – processes and frameworks?Do you have the support of your family as you enter this next phase of your life?What’s the best way for you to learn the technical skills required? Is it a university degree, or a combination of degree, certification program, and/or bootcamp?Are you prepared for the costs associated with a career-change? Not just moving from employee to student, but prepared for the right business for your newly acquired skills.Do you have what it takes to make your desired career change? Are you prepared for the challenges, pitfalls, and triumphs change and new projects brings? You’ve thought long and hard about these questions. Your family’s on board. You’ve made it through an intensive educational program, and you’re ready for next steps. So, now what? Well, we’ve got a few articles you might want to check out to learn best practices for applying in this industry. Though you may have an edge in your business knowledge, goals, processes, and implementation of technologies, there are a few other pieces we can offer to round things out. We want to help set you up for success with tips for your resume, including how to boost it with video, and add a layer of depth without shedding the basics. And to round it all out, check out our article on how to rock your interview.  Over to You  If you’re interested in making a career-change into the world of data, let us know how we did with this article. What other questions do you have? And if you’ve made the leap, we’d love to hear from you about your journey into Data Science or other position in the Data and Tech industry. If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, Bioinformatics, Computer Vision, or Data Science, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com

COMPUTER VISION AND MORE. WHAT’S IN STORE FOR 2020?

Computer Vision and More. What’s in Store for 2020?

For years, we’ve been blending tech with tradition as technological advances have moved us forward. At the heart of it all are Data, the Internet of Things (IoT) and the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). Demand is high for advanced connected devices and at the industrial level, this means robots. According to market reports, the smart robot market is expected to be worth just over $14 billion by 2023. As we reach the turn of the decade, there are a few other trends to be mindful of as well. These include such disruptive technologies as automation, phygital spaces, smart buildings, and digital twinning to name a few. While disruption may often be evocative of something negative. In the tech world, it isn’t. But how the technologies are used and what they’re for may change our world, not unlike the invention of electricity changed the world of agriculture into the Industrial Age. With that in mind, here are some of the most disruptive technologies for 2020: Robots & Automation It’s almost a broken record, isn’t it? How quickly technological advances are marching across our landscape of connected devices? But the immersion of these devices into our lives offer a variety of interactions far beyond that we’ve so far imagined. AI-enabled robots, for example, are able to interact and respond to time crunched human situations. There’s more to robots and automation than meets the eye and the additional technologies just might have the answers to the challenges we are facing and will face in the future. Phygital Spaces  What if you could go to a baseball game with the experience of being at the game without leaving your couch? What if you could watch a race as though you were a participant? What if…? What if the technology to do this was already here? Enter phygital spaces, the blending of physical spaces and digital technology by bringing together AR, VR, mixed, and human reality.  Ready, Player One? Predictions are in for the growth of the AR/VR Industry to a $160 billion industry in the next three years.  Smart buildings  Since 2000, the smart building market has been expanding. Voice Assistants, smart home tech, and IoT allow you to check on your home’s safety from a remote location, control your temperatures, and even let the cable man in (if you still have it) without ever leaving your office.  However, immersive experiences are also becoming part of business management systems as well. The common denominating factor in these new advances? Where once you controlled each stage, now, based on preferences, changes will be made by measuring heat signatures, time of day, or some other assigned metric.   Safety & Security Come First As exciting as these advances are, there is one important thing to remember. While robots have become smarter and we offer an abundance of Data to varying degrees for our convenience, robots are not human. They may be able to reason in bits and bytes, but moral reasoning remains an entirely human endeavor. GDPR in the UK. Data Privacy Regulations state by state across the United States. They are steps in ensuring your Data’s safety and security, but as we increasingly combine and blend robots and automation, AR and VR technologies, digital twinning, voice assistants, and more across our connected devices its important to be aware and careful what you do on networked systems. No matter how strong your password, no matter how secure your system, everything can be hacked. Want to get a jump on your 2020 job search? If you’re interested in Computer Vision, Robots and Automation, Big Data and Digital or Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Privacy Is Big Business For Small And Mid-Size Businesses

Privacy is Big Business for Small and Mid-Size Businesses

If you’re a small to mid-size business and think cyber criminals only go after big business; think again. It’s just as important, if not more important for you to have privacy plans in place. This goes way beyond GDPR and state-to-state rules, this is about how you care for your customers personal information. The return on investment will set the tone for future years of your business. After all, according to a 2018 report by Verizon, 58% of cyber-attacks targeted small business. While it may seem counter-intuitive and larger businesses are bigger fish to go after, they can be difficult to get into. After all, they’ve got the resources to protect their customer’s Data and are hyper aware of what it can be to their business if they don’t. Smaller and mid-size businesses generally don’t have the resources of the larger businesses, and may not focus on cybersecurity like they should which leaves their business wide open for cybercriminals. Chinks in the Armor of Your Data Cybercriminals excel at finding “chinks in the armor” of your Data. They’ll use any advantage to break in from the usual hacking and malware to physical breaches. One improperly secured device can be just the entry they need into your entire system.  What can you do? Be focused in your approach to Data security. Many small businesses tend to put out fires, rather than have a focused strategy. And each approach to tighten security can lead to more opportunity for hacking.Communicate your strategy to every member of your team. Something as small as clicking on the wrong link can lead to a Data breach.Train your staff on measures they can take such as to not click on a link they’re not expecting, to check email addresses and ensure they’re approved or white-listed as okay to access. The more aware your staff are, the better able they’ll be able to help ensure the security of your business’ Data. While staff may be on the front lines, this also requires a commitment from senior executives as well. Understand that just because you’re not dealing in billions of dollars, you may actually be at greater risk. Why? Because unlike the larger companies, your business may not survive the fallout of a cyber-attack. How to Protect Your SMB You can protect your business by creating a Data Security Strategy and consider the following: Encrypt your data;Authenticate your users by either a 2-step verification process or having them enter some kind of code;Authorize access to trusted sources. Encrypting Data helps protect the private and sensitive information and makes it unreadable without the correct key. To ensure only those who are trusted sources have access is through authentication.  Authentication can include username/password, code, tokens, phone number, and image association such as click only the boxes with pictures of street lights or stop signs. This helps your business control who has access and gives you tighter rein over who sees sensitive information and what they can do with it.  By defining the rules and regulations of access to information, training your employees to be aware and what to do to ensure security, you can strike a balance of increased security and transparency to your customers. In other words, the efforts you go through to protect their Data will put you ahead of the competition as you make inroads toward a Data privacy strategy while others take action as things happen. One Final Thought Ensuring your business’ Data is protected and detecting times when it may have been breached is increasingly important to help minimize damage. One issue SMBs face is that it may take longer to detect if there isn’t a Data security plan in place. The more quickly you can detect an issue, the more quickly you can reduce its impact and the more quickly and effectively you can respond, the better.  Interestingly, smaller businesses tend to have a better overall picture of their assets than larger businesses. This can be a boon when you communicate your new cybersecurity strategy to your teams and offers a significant return on investment of your resources. If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Is Bioinformatics The Next “Rock Star” In Data?

Is Bioinformatics the Next “Rock Star” in Data?

It’s open enrolment for healthcare here in the US with a maze of plans to choose from. If you want to dip your toes into the world of healthcare with a tech bent, you may want to check out Bioinformatics or health informatics, and yes, there is a difference.  Bioinformatics is a growing field and is expected to grow to $16 billion by the 2022. It may just be the next “rock star” profession for those in the Data & Analytics fields. So, what is Bioinformatics and how is it different from Health Informatics? What is Bioinformatics? It’s the marriage of biology and information technology. In a world constantly on the go, and as we grow older and live longer, it helps us find the answers we seek. Bioinformatics often begins at the beginning. Think genome research, for a start. Yet, ultimately, it focuses on biological data in medical research and drug development. Imagine collecting and organizing data to annotate, record, analyze, and extract structural information in relation to protein sequences or applying your knowledge to chromosome therapy, drug innovations, or forensic analysis.  Because of the advances in IT, what was once unimaginable is now available. A booming industry which is a boon to the population. House, M.D. meets Bones.  Within this industry are sub-categories and sub-applications. In other words, there’s something for everyone interested in both biology and computer science. Here’s a quick list: Medical BiotechnologyAnimal BiotechnologyAcademicsAgricultureForensicsEnvironmental And within these sectors, though not the full list, their applications: GenomicsChemoinformaticsDrug designTransciptomics What is Health Informatics? Health Informatics is similar to Bioinformatics in that it uses computer technology to further advancements in medicine. However, while Bioinformatics focuses on the biology side of things, Health Informatics (HI) is focused on the patient side; helping doctors and patients determine care. HI is the application of design, development, and analysis of patient and healthcare Data systems. It’s the nervous system equivalent of a hospital or doctor’s office which houses medical records, billing systems, and compliance systems. For those with a computer science background who are more interested in the information infrastructure and architecture of a healthcare enterprise, Health Informatics may be for you. If you’re interested in the administration side of healthcare, you may want to think about Health Information Management (HIM). You can also learn more, here. Getting Your Foot in the Door You know the basics. Have a technical background with the communication skills to explain your findings. Boost your resume with video. Have done a project or two to show your work and capabilities, but when you drill down to something like informatics, there’s one more bit of training you’ll want to have. Since Bioinformatics, for example, is the marriage of biology and technology, it’s important to have a background in molecular biology and computer science. Drill down further and you’ll want to include database design as well. The Sum of its Parts Bioinformatics is an emerging science, in which we develop and use computer databases to enhance our biological research. Analyzing, storing, managing the data we collect or extract; this is the sum of its parts. Advancements here give us the opportunity to more efficiently identify new therapies, new treatments, new sequences to better understand disease. The potential to improve personalized medicine is exponential. What we learn and find today may help us solve tomorrow’s healthcare issues.  Want to get in on this growing healthcare field and the next generation of IT? Interested in Big Data and Analytics, but not necessarily the healthcare industry. We’ve got you covered. We specialize in Junior and Senior roles. We may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Tips for your Data & Analytics Resume

Tips for your Data & Analytics Resume

So, you’re pursuing a career in Data & Analytics. The brilliant thing about this is you’re entering a fast-growing industry with the potential for a great salary. But, unfortunately, this also means you’re probably entering into one of the most competitive fields out there right now.  The question is, how can you ensure your resume stands out from the crowd and impresses any potential employer?  Here are some top tips to help boost your Data & Analytics resume. Formatting is important It may seem obvious, but handing over a messy resume with no headings and massive blocks of text is no way to make a good first impression. Research suggests your resume is only looked at for a total of six seconds, so it’s important to make an impact on first glance.  Not only does this entail creating a well-presented document overall, but it also means paying attention to the small details such as structuring your resume to best emphasise the qualities and experience you think speak most highly of your ability to do the job well. This is why utilising a reverse chronological format is sometimes a worthwhile idea. For a highly competitive job in a Data & Analytics related field, where past experience is an important factor, beginning a resume with your most recent experience nearest the top will draw the eye and attention of the hiring manager reading it. Additionally, make sure your skills, qualifications, extra courses and impressive achievements are highlighted and clearly stated within the main body. As such, it’s better to use bullet points wherever possible instead of paragraphs and, consequently, you’ll find your resume a lot more compact and legible; in other words, much more likely to be read and remembered.  Quality over quantity  Having the most aesthetically pleasing resume in the world will mean nothing if the content doesn’t relate to the job you’re applying for. Again, this may sound obvious but it’s always worth combing through your resume to eliminate any irrelevant features and leave more space to talk about the things that matter.  Having a single page summarizing the most impressive contributions in your last role, or the most valuable insights gathered from a particular project you were involved with, is much more valuable than a multi-page essay about your volunteering with a local soccer club five years ago (unless, of course, your role heavily related to Data & Analytics). When introducing yourself, avoid long sentences and pronouns, and use impactful verbs when describing your achievements: for instance, try “instigated” instead of “started” and “spearheaded” instead of “led”. Also be sure to highlight and, where possible, quantify how your previous work in data/analytics benefitted your old company.  Know the value of your skillset It’s worth dedicating a section of your resume just to listing your most valuable skills as they relate to the job you want. However, make sure to be specific when describing your technical skills and experience with whichever tool you’re talking about. State your level of expertise and how you utilized said software to make your knowledge clear to whoever’s reading.  If you’re applying for an entry level position, however, and don’t have much experience or technical skills yet, it’s important to show off whichever skills you already have and how they  will make you a great addition. It’s worth researching which of your more general skills are the most sought after by employers, and then gaining an understanding of which ones best relate to the job you’re trying to get. For jobs working in Data Science, for instance, maths skills, analytical skills and problem solving are well worth mentioning. Ultimately, you want this section to contain a comprehensive, impressive sounding, and accurate, list of your most relevant skills.   If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to find out more:  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. This guest blog was provided by check-a-salary. 

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