Moving to San Francisco



Contributed by Jamie Finnigan 

THE COST OF LIVING IN SAN FRANCISCO


It’s no secret that SF is an expensive city. While rent is expensive, grocery and restaurant prices aren’t too steep, so you can eat out without having to worry about breaking the bank. Grabbing lunch during the week? Expect to pay about $10 on your meal. Stop by Trader Joe’s for food for the week and expect to pay around $50-75.

Have a car? If you live in San Francisco proper, leave it at home. It is often difficult to find a place on the street to park anyway. If you do bring your car (like I did), monthly parking garage rates go for $400 depending on which garage you choose. If you choose to park on the street full-time, residential parking permits are currently $145 for the year. However, I found that having a car in SF is essentially pointless as public transportation and Uber can get you anywhere you want to go. The MUNI and BART are the easiest (and cheapest) ways to get around the city and to work. A monthly MUNI pass is $81 per month.

The median rent for a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco is $3,108, however it is often more feasible for graduates to rent a one-bedroom apartment and share it with a housemate. That may sound ridiculous, however, most San Francisco homes/apartments are from the early 1900s when the open concept floorplan was not yet common. You will often find apartments with enclosed living rooms/dining rooms, turning one-bedroom apartments into two-bedroom apartments without having the extra price tag. Speaking from experience. you can expect to pay $1400-1500 per month with this option, if you live in the heart of the city. Which brings me to my next point…

WHERE TO LIVE IN SAN FRANCISCO


If you’re looking to live true city life living in San Francisco is a must. Rent prices vary by neighborhood, and if you want more space/bang for your buck, look into living in the Sunset or Richmond districts. These neighborhoods are very residential, often a lot quieter and are conveniently located near Golden Gate Park. If you want to be walking distance to popular restaurants/bars, look into living in the Marina, North Beach or SOMA districts. These are all favorable neighborhoods with lots to do but are typically a little more expensive. Nob Hill and Russian Hill are great neighborhoods, and are close to the office, and you can usually find reasonably priced apartments in these areas as well. Pacific Heights and Fillmore District are arguably the most expensive neighborhoods in the city, but the apartments are typically newly renovated & the most spacious – you get what you pay for! The Mission district is a very up and coming neighborhood with TONS to do, the best Mexican food San Francisco has to offer and is home to the infamous Mission Dolores Park  the best Sunday activity, if you're asking me.

If you want something that is a little more affordable or practical, consider living outside the city. With BART serving the peninsula and the East Bay, it is easy and affordable to get to work from outside the city. Almost anywhere down the peninsula has more affordable housing and you can easily hop on BART all the way from Millbrae (by SFO) to FiDi down the peninsula. There are nice parts of Oakland to consider living & Berkeley is a great area, especially being a college town, which may make the transition easier. Walnut Creek is a little further away, but it’s still a great area with lots of nightlife and things to do.

MOVING AWAY FROM FRIENDS & FAMILY


Moving away from home is always bittersweet. You’re excited for your next step but may feel uneasy about leaving the place you’ve called home over the years. One way to combat this is to choose a company with the right culture. A career in recruitment can include long hours and lots of hard work, so having colleagues who are not just people you work with but colleagues who are your friends in and outside of work.

Harnham SF has a culture that truly is second to none and we work in a highly collaborative environment where we frequently celebrate each other’s “wins”. You can find almost the entire SF team in the kitchen eating lunch together every day, out at happy hours, at Giants games, at escape rooms, having “family” potlucks and everything in between.

For more information about working for Harnham or even relocating to San Francisco, contact Jamie Finnigan via email at jamiefinnigan@harnham.com.

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HRtech Gets A Mindset Shift In 2020

HRTech Gets a Mindset Shift in 2020

Recent editor picks on LinkedIn highlight how jobs will change in the future. But as changes come, there are a dizzying array of tech advancements, products, and more in the job market landscape.If you’ve been looking through the telescopic lens of the Digital transformation and wonder, what’s next? Well, we may have a role for you. If you’re a business and wonder what’s next, we have some ideas to help you identify, hire, and retain top talent within the Data professional industry. Setting a Mindset Shift We have reached a time in which simply adding the word “tech” to something has shifted. Thinking digitally, or the Digital transformation combines the why with who, how, and which. Who does our technology impact, how will it change how they work, and which advancement is best suited to answer the call?  Below are just a few things to consider when developing your: Recruitment is a process, not a transaction. Interaction instead of reaction.Factor in not only human skills, but machine skills as well.Make employee experience a priority. Experience leads to Data which leads to Insights.Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning have a wider role to play within the recruitment space.Base software selection decisions on user experience. Include everyone who will use the software in both the vendor demonstration and the decision process.Seek references from vendors to foster trust and connect with other organizations.Cloud based solutions far outweigh non-cloud solutions in today’s business climate. These are just a few suggestions to consider as you rethink your HR strategies. Incorporating technology with the human element is a new road for many businesses and essential for the future of work.  Design for Data and Insights Whether you’re talking about the employee experience or the customer journey, it’s important to design the process to generate Data. When you use design thinking, you put people at the center and from there can measure the variables which offer insights into thoughts and feelings. When you know these answers, you can always be improving and optimize for success.  As you consider what to invest in next, remember to think about the Data first. Use your workforce insights to determine the best way to move forward and understand how people impact your business. Measure effectiveness, but understand workforce insights go hand-in-hand with delivery. Rather than operating individually in a separate silo, everything is interconnected, just like in our day-to-day lives. It’s this connectedness which is the greatest shift. From our phones, our iPads, our laptops, and so on, we are able to tap into workforce solutions and find at its center a structurally sound HR strategy to ensure next gen talent is identified, hired, and retained. While we often speak of what you can do to retain your top talent, another focus might be how you communicate with leadership. To ensure everyone is on the same page, it’s important to be sure messaging is consistent across your organization. It’s this messaging along with new systems and strategies in which training and education play an even bigger part than in the past. There’s so much to learn and it comes so fast, that adoption of new technologies must be thought out in advance. Try to avoid chasing the next shiny object or new advancement and have a plan in place for staff and stakeholders to follow. Setting your top priorities now, as we enter a new decade of Data, can help ensure you’re proactive in your business strategy, not reactive. If you’re interested in AI, Big Data and Digital or Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Our Interview with Amit Jnagal

Our Interview With Amit Jnagal, CEO Of AI Firm Infrrd

Amit Jnagal is the CEO of Infrrd.ai, an award-winning Artificial Intelligence software firm in San Jose. We reached out to learn what had inspired Amit to start the business and what trends he predicted for the future of the industry. In addition, we asked his take on diversity in business as well as what he looked for in prospective candidates. Here’s what he had to tell us. What inspired Infrrd.ai? It’ll be ten years next month that I started Infrrd. The same age as my son, who inspired it. Well, I’d wanted to start a venture of my own since I graduated and spent the next 12 years working for two large organizations. These experiences led to work with some exceptionally talented people. So, being a forward-thinker, I made a mental list of their names and resolved to have them work for me once my own venture took off.  I was cruising with a high-flying career when our first child was born. It was then I realized if I was ever going to start something of my own, the time was now. So, I quit my corporate job when my son was 10 days old and got to work. I’ve been an entrepreneur ever since and was successful in getting most people on my mental list to join me - some agreed in a second, some took a couple of years of convincing, a few took more than five years, and there are a few people that I am still working on. While I’ve had my share of failed ventures, this is my success and it’s taken a decade to get here.  How have trends in the industry affected your business and what do you see in the future of say, the next one to five years?  In my more than two decades of experience, I have witnessed two revolutions which have fundamentally changed the way the world works. The first was the advent of the internet and the second was smart phones.  We are at the beginning of another such revolution in AI. It amazes me still, the things we can do for our clients using AI for automation. The demand means jobs, yet at the same time, there are a few which will cease to exist, which I wrote about earlier this year.  My son, now 10-years old wants to be a pilot when he grows up. But I suspect that will be one of the jobs which ceases to exist by the time he enters the workforce. AI is here. And over the next one to five years, it’s important for businesses to know how to redesign their business around it. In order to thrive, they’ll want to be AI enabled. What are your recommendations for building a team within a startup? Where do I start? Well, I have plenty of recommendations of how to NOT to build a team within a startup. But when you’re first scaling your business, there are different phases as you start up. As you grow, you’ll need people with different specializations.  During the first few years, you’ll need people who are generalists - folks who are happy to do whatever needs to be done to move the company forward. Sales on Monday, Customer Support Management on Thursday, and throughout the week continuing to build the product. People who thrive on ever-changing responsibilities would do well in the beginning of a startup. In fact, it’s impossible to get off the ground without them.   But if they do their job right and you start to grow, a time will come when you will need specialists that can create a system for each part of the organization and scale it. This is when you start hiring separate VP of Sales, VP of Customer Success, VP of Marketing, and fine tune your leadership within your data professionals team; let them build their teams. People who get the startup started and those who scale it have very different skills and styles of working. It is important to get the right people at the right time. What are some things to consider both as a business and a candidate in regard to diversity?  Here’s an answer that you might not expect. You need to consider nothing when it comes to diversity; rather you need to 'un-consider' stuff that might cloud your judgement.  With experience, everyone starts collecting heuristics that prejudice how they look at people. More often than not, this prejudice blocks you from hiring people by 'considering' heuristics that are irrelevant. Learn to evaluate people for what they bring to the table rather than their demography.  I was surprised when we won the diversity award for 2018. I had never looked at my team using a demography lens to figure out what kind of people to hire. To our mind, as long as you have the right skill and experience to do the work, you’ll get a shot at proving yourself at Infrrd. What are companies like yours looking for in a candidate hire?  We go through a ton of profiles before we make an offer to someone. What we look for in a candidate varies by experience.  At the entry level, we look for people who have shown some spark and done something that most other people have not - creating new algorithms, getting certified in some technology, presented paper at conferences or technical events, etc.  For mid-level hires, our primary concern besides skill is whether this person exhibits our values and if he or she will gel with our team. High performers are great. But make sure they’re a good fit with the rest of your team. Remember when I said I knew how NOT to build a team? We’ve had our fair share of people and teams who just didn’t click and it was detrimental to business.  At a senior level, we look for good experience, shared values and an ability to lead people. A good leader can get outstanding results from any team. That is what makes an awesome leadership hire for us. If you’d like to learn more and are interested in working with AI. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more. For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

Diversity in Data

Coming Together: Diversity In The Workplace

Diversity. It’s a hot topic fused into every discussion from the board room to the upper echelons of government. And it’s more than the gender pay gap. It’s about bringing people together with different backgrounds, ideologies, processes, and creative persuasions. This is how you create your dream team – different ideas focused on a common goal.  We all know this at our core, but what does it mean to put it into action? In our 2019 Salary Guide, we covered a wide spectrum of how to hire and retain employees and within it discovered where the diversity gaps lay within the Data & Analytics industry. Marketing & Insight roles may have had the smallest gap, but Data Science teams had the largest. On the heels of our Salary Guide, keep an eye out for our upcoming Annual Diversity Report. But before we can do anything, we need to talk about culture. Specifically, changing our business culture to embrace diversity and inclusion. Did you know this change could help attract top talent and drive stronger teams to more innovative results? How to Put Diversity Initiatives Into Practice According to a 2018 study from McKinsey, diverse companies from their general workforce to their leadership are 33 percent more likely to have higher profitability than their competitors who are not as diverse. For gender diversity, the margin is 21 percent. Add to this, government regulations, candidates’ evaluation of diversity in an organization, and the company’s own plans to improve their efforts, and the task seems daunting enough. Diversity questions are no longer relegated to the just one group or another, now the question comes from every direction. Every location.  Below are just a few ways to begin your Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives Be Open to New Things and Establish a Sense of Belonging. Create a space where each person can bloom and shine. Establish a connection in which people are relaxed and can be themselves. Give them opportunities to create and engage in the workplace. Leadership is Key. Lead by example. Show empathy and avoid making diversity and inclusion the exclusive domain of HR. This is a time for everyone to get involved, to understand, and to remember why diversity is important. It’s more than ticking a box and it’s not one-size fits all. But each step forward is for the betterment of the business.Make Inclusion Part of Your Company Culture. Don’t think of diversity and inclusion as a one-day workshop. This is the time where you bring everyone together to learn what it means to be inclusive. Have you ever felt out of place or uncomfortable in a situation? Did anyone come to include you into the goings on or were you left to your own devices? Put yourself in other’s shoes and have your team do the same. Then identify behaviors and build new habits which support open and honest communication. It is okay for people to disagree, it’s what leads to real change. The key is to not let biases be mistaken for healthy discussion.You are Your Brand. Wear it Well. Company culture and brand are linked. They are infused in the products and services you offer to the world. Does your company culture of diversity reflect that of your customer base? What do you want your brand to say? How do you want to be known as a company? What new idea might you come up with divergent voices giving their thoughts and opinions? These are just a few of the ways you begin to establish a diverse and inclusive culture in your business. Now is the time to adapt your processes to scale for these behaviors. Ask yourself about the makeup of your meetings. Who attends? Who speaks? Is anyone being left out whose input you value? People First, Then Data As companies struggle to begin their diversity initiatives, there are still some caveats. The first is to remember you’re hiring people, not the data on a spreadsheet. Every business knows the importance of data and People Analytics is no different. But the problem begins with too small numbers as businesses try to pinpoint where they need to improve their diversity efforts.  Limited data about certain groups within the larger can be misleading. So, while it may seem counterintuitive, the answer is to broaden categories. Rather than focus on ethnicities, age, background consider the group overall. It’s the breaking down of demographics, where businesses begin to misstep on their path to diversity. So, what are some steps you can take to help improve your diversity initiatives? Well, here are a few to get you started. Avoid sample-based analyses. Focus on a range of outcomes. For example, are women represented well? What about women of color? Is there a wider variety of ages? Is the male contingent homogenous or are different demographics represented?Talk to employees and dig past first glances. Interviews with staff help to remind you these are people who cannot be defined by a statistic. It’s during this time you can learn more about them, their struggles, aspirations, and cultural insights. Descriptions take into account surface information such as race, gender, socio-economic status, and so on. Decisions based on data ripple through people’s careers and can affect their livelihoods.Ensure managers are engaged as allies. Just as leadership is key to ensuring the company culture embraces diversity, so too are the managers. It is they who are crucial as they make key hiring decisions, determine projects, and develop employees for advancement. Leadership offers an overview, but it’s the managers who shape the day-to-day of the employee experience.  One Final Thought… Most of us don’t start out intending to exclude anyone, but we naturally gravitate toward people like us or whom we imagine can best benefit our business. But when we open ourselves up to the possibilities of a more diverse workforce, the possibilities are endless. To begin, however, we must understand where the problems are, and from there fix them. At Harnham, we’re proud to be diverse in our company culture. In our inaugural Diversity Report, we showcased our near 50-50 split within our leadership and our efforts to be inclusive throughout our organization.  If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more. For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

How to lead a Data team

How To Lead A Data Team

Dream teams from sports to business are an ideal everyone aspires to live up to. But what is it every basketball or football dynasty has which makes them a dream team? What is it that brings individuals together to overcome odds, set examples, find solutions, and create the next best thing? Good management.  The need for good management is no different in the Data Science world. Yet according to our latest Salary Guide, poor management is one of the top five reasons Data professionals leave companies. So, let’s take a look at what poor management is, what causes it, and how businesses can better retain Data talent. What’s Your Data Science Strategy? Most businesses know they need a Data team. They may also assume that a Data Scientist who performed well can lead a Data team. But that isn’t necessarily the case. Managers have to know things like P&L statements, how to build a business case, make market assessments, and how to deal with people. And that’s just for a start.  The leader of a Data team has a number of other factors to consider as well such as Data Governance, MDM, compliance, legal issues around the use of algorithms, and the list goes on. At the same time, they also need to be managing their team with trust, authenticity, and candor. The list of responsibilities can be daunting and if someone is given too much too soon and without support, it can be a recipe for disaster. Other businesses might believe that a top performing Data Scientist would make a good manager. Yet these are two different fields. Or you might look at it this way. If you are willing to upskill a top performing Data professional and train them in managerial skills, giving them the education and support they need, that is one solution. Another solution is to create a Data Science strategy which brings in people with business backgrounds. Data Science is a diverse field and people come from a number of backgrounds not just Computer Science or Biostatistics, for example.  Now that you’ve seen what might cause a manager to fail, let’s take a look at a few tips to help you succeed. Seven Tips for Managing a Data Team Managing a team is about being able to hire, retain, and develop great talent. But if the manager has no management training, well, that’s how things tend to fall apart. Here a few tips to consider to help ensure you and your team work together to become the dream team of your organization: Build trust by caring about your team. Help define their role within the organization. Ensure projects are exciting and that they’re not being asked to do project with vague guidelines or unrealistic timeframes.Be open and candid. Remember, Data Scientists are trained in how to gather, collect, and analyze information. If anyone can see right through a façade, it will be these Data professionals. Have those “tough” conversations throughout every stage of the hiring, onboarding, and day-to-day, so that no one is caught unaware.Offer consistent feedback. And ask for it for yourself as well from your team.Ensure your team understands the business goals behind their projects. Let them in on the bigger picture. Think long-term recruitment for a permanent role, not short-term. If you have an urgent project, consider contracting it out. Prioritize diversity to include academic discipline and professional experience. Does the way this person view the world expand the knowledge of your team’s knowledge? Dream teams don’t always have to agree. Sometimes, the best solutions are found when there are other opinions. Finding the perfect, “Full Stack” Data Scientist or Data Engineer or Analyst is not impossible, and retaining them can be even easier. If you’ve done your job well, your team will trust you, have a balanced skillset, and understand how their work supports the organization and its goals. For more information on how to be a great manager, check out this article from HBR.  Ready for the next step?  Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more. For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

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