Life Science Analytics

What We Do

From Biotech and Pharmaceutical firms, to Research and Academia, we help the best Life Science Analytics talent find rewarding careers.

With cutting edge sequencing techniques providing more insights into data than ever, every day sees the rise of new technology and new start-ups to accompany it. Now that technology allows for a person’s entire genomic data to be processed within a day, there is a huge demand for those who can analyze information and apply insights to advances in Healthcare.

Whether you’re learning about living systems, creating algorithms to interpret DNA, or building real—world models to interpret your findings, our Life Science team understand the importance of placing the right talent in the right business.

how We Do it

Our specialist Life Science Analytics team’s unique understanding ensures exceptional service throughout the entirety of your job search or recruitment process.

We have developed an in-depth knowledge of the market, as well as the different types of organizations that we work with, and their diverse requirements.

By understanding the full picture, are we able to deliver staffing solutions that ensure the very best outcome for everyone we work with.

What sets us apart?

Whatever your specialism, we have the knowledge, the network, and the required drive to find the best possible result.

Our specialty is matching highly experienced and skilled talent, with world leading organizations and forward-thinkers who see the opportunities that Life Science Analytics offer.

We have a unique understanding of this arena and excellent relationships with some of the best organizations around. If you’re hoping to change career or are looking for the next member of your team, we can help you.

Latest Jobs

Salary

US$110000 - US$160000 per year + health, dental, vision

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Do you want to make have an impact in the immuno-oncology field as a Bioinformatics Engineer? Apply!

Salary

US$110000 - US$135000 per year + STOCK, BONUS, BENEFITS

Location

Hayward, California

Description

Have a product-focused mentality and expertise working with exciting technology doing bioinformatics analysis?

Salary

US$260000 - US$300000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Develop cloud-based machine learning algorithms for biological problems.

Salary

US$160000 - US$200000 per annum + health, vision, dental

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Are you a machine learning expert with knowledge of NGS and want to cure cancer? Apply!

Salary

US$130000 - US$180000 per year + health, dental, vision

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Do you want to make have an impact in the immuno-oncology field as a Senior Bioinformatics Engineer? Apply here and save lives!

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

How Computer Vision Is Changing Healthcare

It may seem like every new decade we have a new technology to master. But what if we’ve flipped the script? Now AI has a new technology to master. I'm talking about Computer Vision. Just like humans learn to identify shapes into objects as children, so too, must the technologies we’ve created.  Why? Because autonomous vehicles need to know the difference between a tree and a person holding their grocery bags. Because manufacturing bots need to identify defective products before they go to the public. And in healthcare, Computer Vision can help us identify disease, help doctors make diagnoses, and dig deeper into what makes humans human. Three Trends to Watch  Already, systems have a 99% accuracy rate at emulating human sight. Like our own calculations when we “see” an object, machines will have to process, analyze, and understand the image as well. Thanks to Machine Learning and Neural Networks using pattern recognition, this is possible. What could this mean for the healthcare industry? Imaging Devices like X-Rays and MRI Machines will get smaller and more mobile. This trend will allow simpler imaging, quicker workflows, and live imaging for quicker diagnoses.Next Generation Phenotyping (NGP) allows predictive diagnoses using Computer Vision and Deep Learning to analyze data at the molecular level. Telemedicine to open greater access to your doctor rather than the traditional brick-and-mortar doctor’s office visit. Electronic Health Records (EHR) for a patient profile gives direct access to patient information and could reduce the cost of logistics and gaps in expertise. And Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM) allows for real-time medical decisions to flow between patient-doctor without the ubiquitous red tape traditional medicine brings. Recent advancements in visual technologies will have a strong impact in a variety of industries. But it’s in the healthcare industry, Computer Vision, AI, and IoT will particularly shine as the technologies converge for greater progress in healthcare.  AIoT and Image-Based Data Converge for Improved Outcomes  There are such a variety of uses for Computer Vision in medicine, it can be hard to imagine where it can't be used. When you consider how much medical data is image-based such as mammograms, MRIs, CT Scans, X-Rays, and Echocardiograms, it’s easy to see how patients will benefit.  Imagine getting an early diagnosis to stop the spread of cancer or stopping dementia in its tracks. These systems alone can assist with surgery, identify problems early, and more. When your medical team of institutions, providers, and patients have access to these systems and truly partner, then this becomes the future of healthcare.    Add to improvements in computer vision, the rapidly advancing technologies of AI, and IoT and watch how quickly problem-solving scenario outcomes improve across all industries. Much like the last convergence of mobile phones and the internet, AIoT will usher in a new era of human history in similar fashion. Risk and Reward of AIoT, ML, and Computer Vision With greater advancement, comes greater risk and reward. As sensors and connectivity multiply across devices and industries, renewed focus should include privacy and security. Such large volumes of Data, even within the healthcare industry, can be targets for hackers as well as government entities. It may seem strange to consider this in the light of the healthcare vertical, but imagine the repercussions of denials due to medical issues or the inverse of identity theft.  The convergence of AIoT and Computer Vision technologies use complex algorithms for predictive analytics. Add Machine Learning into the mix and watch workflows streamline, simplified problem-solving unfold, and improved reliability and sustainability of data capture and how it can enhance an organization’s processes.  In the cumbersome world of healthcare and its institutions, Computer Vision, AI, IoT, and Machine Learning offer a simpatico balance between patient and provider that flips traditional healthcare upside down. Advancements within the last few years and in the coming decade are primed to bridge the gap between patient and provider. But it’s going to need Data professionals who have a passion for the industry and can guide these technologies to the next stages in their development. The Computer Vision industry is supercharged and is expected to reach $48.6 billion by 2022. Ready to see where the latest technologies can take you? If you’re interested in Computer Vision, Big Data, and Analytics, Robotics, and more, we may have a role for you.  Check out our current vacancies or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com. For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

The Flu, Snake Bites, And The Covid-19 Virus: Jacob Glanville From Netflix’s ‘Pandemic'

Jacob Glanville features in the new Netflix series ‘Pandemic’, discussing the pioneering progress that he and his team at Distributed Bio have been making in the world of bioengineered medicine. This week we sat down with Jacob Glanville, CEO of Distributed Bio, field leaders in advanced computational immunoengineering of biomedicines. Featuring in the new Netflix series ‘Pandemic’, a look into the teams that are fighting to prevent a global outbreak of disease, Glanville is a highly renowned expert with an incredible track record.  With a PhD from Stanford, and having spent four years as a Principal Scientist at Pfizer, he left to found Distributed Bio. With Sarah Ives, Director of Influenza Centivax at Distributed Bio, the team is developing a new class of universal, utilizing pioneering computational technologies. “We use high throughput computational docking to try to help characterize how many unique epitopes might exist on the surface of a viral coat protein or a pathogen protein. Then, we also use computational methods to identify distinct elements of those diverse members of viral cost proteins from lots of different evolved versions of the same pathogen. And that's the centerpiece of how our vaccine technology works. We co-administer a bunch of really different variants all at a low dose so that only the shared sites are essentially at a high enough dose to be responded to.” This technique allows for Distributed Bio to create vaccines for almost any virus, at a fast pace, and in a safe environment. For example, with the recent outbreak of the SARS-derivative Coronavirus, Glanville is working in collaboration with US military and World Health Organization’s program allows the creation of ‘pseudo-virion’ versions of the disease that can be examined without posing a significant risk: “They take chicken pox, and flow over the outside of the chicken pox, the cost protein of a more serious virus, like the Coronavirus. So it behaves like a Coronavirus and it looks like one on the outside. Like the crunchy M&M shell is, is Coronavirus, but it's got the soft gooey M&M chocolate of, of chickenpox. It's not that dangerous. We are setting up a relationship with [the military] where we could use our antibody discovery library in conjunction with their pseudo-virion particles. We could rapidly discover antibodies against, SARS for instance, without the risk of bringing SARS into our lab.” Their work, however, is not just limited to fighting viral diseases. One of Distributed Bio’s leading projects focuses on creating a universal antivenom to snake bites. With between 80,000 and 130,000 people killed each year by snake bites, the majority of whom live in third-world countries, the need for an easy access and affordable antivenom is high.  “There's around 550 snakes in the world and each one has 20 to 70 proteins. It seems like a huge number of proteins you'd have to target to hit all snakes. But, for me analyzing them, they all collapse down to like 10 different clusters and homologous groups that all snakes share.” Having discovered that a universal approach was both possible and realistic, how did they develop the antibodies needed? “Our team [led by Tim Friede, Director of Herpetology at Distributed Bio, Sawsan Youssef, Chief Science Officer, and Raymond Newland, Principal Scientist.] found a man who spent 17 years injecting himself with snake venom from all over the world, because he loves snakes, and we took his blood. We’ve been using lab methods plus computational methods to help identify a series of antibodies that can hit like a bunch of shared determinants.” But, with a team that comprises of roles varying from Data Engineers and Data Scientists to Bioinformatics specialists, the ability to work together is essential. How does Glanville look to create a collaborative environment?  “I actually try to cross-train people as much as possible. My feeling is, that the extent to which you can actually cross-train people, the less likely you are to encounter a series of like assumption errors. I think what happens is often down to miscommunication between people who are making errors in the cracks where they have both misunderstood what the other person needed and what the previous person was giving them. If people are able to take their colleagues’ expertise into question when they’re working, you've reduced some of that risk.” Having grown up in Guatemala, Glanville is all too aware of the need for easily-available and effective vaccines, particularly as the Western world grows more wary of injections, largely due to the amount of misinformation that is currently circulating. But he understands that these concerns are often down to trust: “It's hard to communicate an epidemiological recommendation to a global population and not make it one sentence. And so, the loudest sentence becomes ‘get no shots’. I'm hoping that a more effective shot makes the story go away. The problem currently with a flu shot is that it still only works half the time. And so people complain about it. I’m hoping that better vaccines and more reasonable communication will cause calmer minds to prevail.” As for any immediate concerns about the impact of the Coronavirus, he once again turns to the issues of accessibility:  “Right now I worry more about Ebola. It's a larger outbreak problem and it's in an area that is poorly served. I think China is pretty good at locking down medical problems.” If you’re looking to build out your team with the industry’s best, get in touch with some of our expert consultants: For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. If you’re on the hunt for your next opportunity and want to join an innovative, world-leading company, we may have a role for you. You can find our latest jobs here. Pandemic is streaming on Netflix now. You can watch the trailer below. 

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