Life Science Analytics jobs in San Francisco

Latest Jobs

Salary

US$140000 - US$160000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Lead their computational efforts for digital assay development at this well-established company!

Salary

US$140000 - US$170000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Use your skills in small-molecule drug discovery!

Salary

Negotiable

Location

Pleasanton, California

Description

Join a global diagnostics leader in an exciting cross-functional bioinformatics role

Salary

US$190000 - US$210000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Lead a data team to grow a more sustainable food solution!

Salary

US$145000 - US$165000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Are you an expert with PRS models looking to impact personal health? Join this bioinformatics team as an expert in human genetics!

Salary

US$190000 - US$210000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Revolutionize food through data!

Salary

US$160000 - US$190000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Apply CNNs and GNNs to drug discovery!

Salary

US$140000 - US$170000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Apply Python to high throughput screening data!

Salary

US$100000 - US$120000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Are you looking for a dynamic opportunity in a therapeutics company? Are you looking to work in a collaborative environment with a growing team? Apply here!

Salary

US$120000 - US$150000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Join a cutting edge small-molecule drug discovery company!

Salary

US$140000 - US$170000 per annum + BENEFITS

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Apply Python and machine learning to NGS data!

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Modelling the Mind with Computational Biology

Since Dolly the sheep was first cloned, humans have had a love-hate relationship with machines. Ok, maybe even before we asked a machine to make a living thing. In a variety of industries, machine learning systems, AI, and robotics are taking on the routine, mundane tasks once reserved for humans. But they’re doing this not to take away from humans, but to give them an opportunity to operate at a higher, creative level.  So, when you’re modelling the mind using Machine Learning and Computational Data in Neuroscience for mind blowing breakthroughs, we sit up and pay attention.  When it comes neuroscience, the benefits far outweigh the pitfalls. Just ask the researchers in China, who’ve developed a way to spot whether or not a child has autism from imaging the back of their eye. Other neurological orders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s falls under the computational neuroscience spectrum as well. From the 1970s to today, computational biology, using analytical, mathematical modelling, and simulation techniques to study behavioral and biological systems has evolved into a variety of subgenres. And it's within these subgenres we get a sneak peek into the mind of man that creates computers that can understand the mind of man. Can you wrap your head around it? Engineering the Mind – Mathematical Relationships The Life Sciences, Biostatistics, and Computational Biology all play a role in physical and mental health care. In seeking to understand the makings of the human mind, to study its syntactic rules, and to help explain how we think, human and machine have come together again. This time in the form of Computational Psychiatry. It’s here we realize our computational theories have often mirrored what we hoped to accomplish in building computers that could think with reason and logic. By understanding how we think, how the brain performs, and how it solves problems, can also help us to identify what we see as abnormalities of the mind – autism, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, dementia, and Parkinson’s disease just to name a few. At its heart, the fundamental message is that the brain’s way solving of inferred problems can be useful in determining hypotheses around neurological disorders.  Even within these subgenres there are varying degrees of theoretical concepts and with the data Computational Biologists and Computational Psychiatrists are able to conduct to navigate the complex inner workings of the brain. But much like the gathering, collecting, and analyzing of the data for the pandemic, the same can be done for in the mental health arena. Not the least of these theorems newly determined comes from a new theoretical model in the journal Medical Hypotheses. In it, T.A. Meridian McDonald, PhD, a research instructor in Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center describes the positive traits of autism.  These positive traits she puts forth include but are not limited to increased attention, increased memory, increase differences in sensory and perception.  Building Computational Relationships Building relationships between neurobiology, environment, and mental signals in computational terms provides a cognitive model to understand the current state of one’s environment. It’s this building of relationships upon which human minds and the inner workings of the machine come together for the common good. There are positives in the negative. Mindset shifts aren’t just for learning how to work online or be more mindful, but are how best to present, and put your best foot forward. If you’re interested in Life Science Analytics, Computational Biology, Decision Science, Machine Learning, or Robotics just to name a few, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.    For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Reflections On The Watermark Conference For Women

This week I was fortunate enough to head down to the Watermark Conference for Women alongside our SVP, Stephanie Brooks. As we enter 2020 and women continue to shatter glass ceilings, Harnham firmly believe in a proactive approach towards placing more women in Data & Tech roles.  Diversity and inclusion are integral to our story and core beliefs and we strive to continually re-evaluate how we create measurable change in the marketplace and redefine the metrics of successful and excellent recruitment. For us, attending the conference was a chance to meet and learn from some of those women who are leading the way. Every talk inspired me in some way but there were a couple I really connected with, and I wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on how they impact the work we do at Harnham. WHAT IS WATER? One talk that struck a chord with me was Seth Godin’s breakfast keynote, inspired by a commencement speech by David Foster Wallace in which he famously tells a story of two fish out at sea. The story goes: “There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says ‘Morning, boys. How’s the water?’ And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes ‘What the hell is water?’”. Godin’s speech was meditated on how attitudes and beliefs are the indicators of future success. In his speech, Godin echoed Wallace’s sentiment that “freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in a myriad of ways every day.” Recruitment is an industry where it is easy to swim along without questioning what water or recruitment really is. To question what is water - what is recruitment - requires thoughtful analysis, careful consideration, and of course, “attention, awareness, and discipline”. As the global leaders of Data & Analytics recruitment, we remind ourselves daily that we are responsible for making meaningful change. Water is, to us, what we make of it.  For Seth, his water is marketing. For Harnham, our water is recruitment and we stand by Wallace’s challenge to stay conscious and alive in our jobs. Day in and day out Harnham will continue to make the case for agency recruitment to be diverse and inclusive, as this is in the best economic interest of our clients.   THE ECONOMY OF DIVERSITY One of the most insightful and compelling moments of the day was a conversation between Pat Mitcheel and Indra Nooyi, the former chair and CEO of PepsiCo. Having directed the company’s global strategy for more than a decade, Nooyi is uniquely poised to discuss the importance and power of having women in every capacity within an organization.  During the conversation, she highlighted the statistics that measure the success companies achieve when women have equal representation at all levels. Currently, gender parity exists in entry-level positions but is absent in the 2nd and 3rd tiers of the workforce. While Nooyi highlighted that having a diverse and inclusive workplace should be an integral part of every company’s corporate social responsibility, she argued that this also leads to unprecedented economic growth. This aligns closely with our view of Diversity at Harnham, something which we examined in more detail in our Diversity Report.  For Nooyi, in making the case for the economics of diversity, she used the work of care economists to show how implementing policies that affected the unique interests of women are proven to not only keep women in the workforce and draw them back to work after children but are also shown to increase the economic output of countries. Institutional change at the corporate level and policies focused on those who have care-giving responsibilities have been shown to positively influence economic growth and increase the happiness and productivity of workers.  BREAKING OUT  As a woman working in a fast-paced and competitive environment, I also took a number of insights from the various break-out sessions held throughout the day. Here are a few highlights:  Women Breaking Barriers: Michelle P. King, Andrea McBride John, Pat Mitchell, Samantha Rapoport Find a mentor, be a mentor. Find a sponsor, be a sponsor. Find a sister, be a sister.Take up space and own it Share your successes with the women and men around you Building a Network of Relationships, Not Just Contacts: Laura Okmin Focus on asking people who they are, not what they do Reach out when you don’t need anything, maintain relationships  The Myth of the Nice Girl Nice people build  trust, trust is the foundation of all business relationships You don’t have to choose between kindness and strength If you want to break glass ceilings, we may have an opportunity for you. Take a look at our latest roles or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com. For our Mid-West and East Coast Team, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. 

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