Life Science Analytics jobs in Boston

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US$140000 - US$150000 per annum

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Boston, Massachusetts

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Are you looking for a dynamic opportunity in a biotech company that is bridging the gap between technology and pharmaceuticals? Apply here!

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With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

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Smile: How Tech is Transforming the Dental Industry In 3D

Ever wondered what’s new at the dentist’s office? If you’re in the hot seat for dentures, crowns, or braces, you may be surprised at the speed you find yourself with a new smile.  Imagine a new set of teeth printed layer by layer before your eyes. Ok, before your dentist’s eyes. 3D printing has been used to print prosthetic limbs, orthopedic and cranial implants, surgical instruments, crowns, and dental restorations.  Electronic Health Records. AI-assisted surgeries. Machine Learning algorithms for more efficient workflows in hospitals and doctors’ offices. Medical technology isn’t new. But what about dental technology? In the Life Sciences field, technology is helping to shape the future of how we heal.  What is 3D Printing? According to the FDA, “3D printing is a process that creates a three-dimensional object by building successive layers of raw material. Each new layer is attached to the previous one until the object is complete. Objects are produced from a 3D file, such as computer-aided design (CAD) drawing or a Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI). The flexibility of this technology allows creation of individualized products such as prosthetics, dentures, or crowns specific to the individual requiring the device.  “It’s Not the Drill, It’s the Bill” Borrowed from an old commercial, the tagline originally implied patients weren’t afraid of the dentist, but of the bill at the end of the appointment. But with today’s technologies, particularly through the benefits of 3D printing, this tagline isn’t quite so dramatic. Here are a few ways, 3D printing in dentistry is benefitting both doctor and patient.  1. The Lab is Onsite Cost savings begin here. When the dentist can do his or her own lab work onsite, it’s less cost to consumers and to the dentist office’s bottom line. Add in the user-friendliness of the available 3D machines which allows dentists to produce molds, models, crowns, bridges, there’s plenty of opportunity to be more efficient and have more control over time and quality of the product.  3D Printers range in price from $20,000-$100,000+ for industrial printers. If you have a dental practice, you could most likely snag a desktop model for around $6,000 or less. Compare that to over $100,000 for outsourcing lab work, labor, and shipping costs included. 2. Getting it Right – More Accurate and Faster Services Reduce errors and increase accuracy when using 3D printing to convert digital images into physical objects within minutes. Watch as your patient’s dentures, for example, are printed layer-by-layer and usable with minutes, not hours or days.  Your technician can get to work as soon as the scan is ready and won’t be inhaling plaster or grinding dust while they work. A clean work space is a safe work space, no matter the industry. 3. Better Quality Products  Skilled dental technicians are still in high demand. But with the advent of 3D printing, their jobs are made a bit easier, and they’re able to design and create better quality products. Milled models could wear down over time. But a 3D model offers more stability and durability than its predecessor. Additionally, this digital model creates a more complex structure and offers a higher level of detail that may not be available in more traditional modeling techniques. 4. Enhanced Patient Experience 3D printing technologies have enhanced patient experience by reducing anxiety and increasing patient acceptance. How? Well, when you can print a model to help explain what’s going to be happening to identify and solve a patient’s problems, it can help alleviate their stresses of the unknown. Add to this a more efficient workflow, more aesthetically pleasing products, and less invasive treatments which make the patient’s visit go more smoothly, and you have a satisfied customer. 5. Save Money Last, but not least, is probably the biggest benefit to both patient and provider. Saving money. Though the upfront investment in a 3D can run into around $20,000 for a top model, it includes all the necessary components printer, reduces the need for skilled staff to produce dentures, implants, and other dental restorative models.  These savings are then passed on to the patient not only monetary value, but in time. The more accurate, efficiency, and speed of 3D printers means less time at the dentist’s office. Less return visits. Less error. With an estimated savings up to 80 percent depending on patient’s needs Smile. Tech is transforming the dental industry. Want to see where it can take you? If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, Advanced Analytics, Life Sciences, Data Science, or any of our Data professional fields, we may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Modelling the Mind with Computational Biology

Since Dolly the sheep was first cloned, humans have had a love-hate relationship with machines. Ok, maybe even before we asked a machine to make a living thing. In a variety of industries, machine learning systems, AI, and robotics are taking on the routine, mundane tasks once reserved for humans. But they’re doing this not to take away from humans, but to give them an opportunity to operate at a higher, creative level.  So, when you’re modelling the mind using Machine Learning and Computational Data in Neuroscience for mind blowing breakthroughs, we sit up and pay attention.  When it comes neuroscience, the benefits far outweigh the pitfalls. Just ask the researchers in China, who’ve developed a way to spot whether or not a child has autism from imaging the back of their eye. Other neurological orders such as dementia and Alzheimer’s falls under the computational neuroscience spectrum as well. From the 1970s to today, computational biology, using analytical, mathematical modelling, and simulation techniques to study behavioral and biological systems has evolved into a variety of subgenres. And it's within these subgenres we get a sneak peek into the mind of man that creates computers that can understand the mind of man. Can you wrap your head around it? Engineering the Mind – Mathematical Relationships The Life Sciences, Biostatistics, and Computational Biology all play a role in physical and mental health care. In seeking to understand the makings of the human mind, to study its syntactic rules, and to help explain how we think, human and machine have come together again. This time in the form of Computational Psychiatry. It’s here we realize our computational theories have often mirrored what we hoped to accomplish in building computers that could think with reason and logic. By understanding how we think, how the brain performs, and how it solves problems, can also help us to identify what we see as abnormalities of the mind – autism, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, dementia, and Parkinson’s disease just to name a few. At its heart, the fundamental message is that the brain’s way solving of inferred problems can be useful in determining hypotheses around neurological disorders.  Even within these subgenres there are varying degrees of theoretical concepts and with the data Computational Biologists and Computational Psychiatrists are able to conduct to navigate the complex inner workings of the brain. But much like the gathering, collecting, and analyzing of the data for the pandemic, the same can be done for in the mental health arena. Not the least of these theorems newly determined comes from a new theoretical model in the journal Medical Hypotheses. In it, T.A. Meridian McDonald, PhD, a research instructor in Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center describes the positive traits of autism.  These positive traits she puts forth include but are not limited to increased attention, increased memory, increase differences in sensory and perception.  Building Computational Relationships Building relationships between neurobiology, environment, and mental signals in computational terms provides a cognitive model to understand the current state of one’s environment. It’s this building of relationships upon which human minds and the inner workings of the machine come together for the common good. There are positives in the negative. Mindset shifts aren’t just for learning how to work online or be more mindful, but are how best to present, and put your best foot forward. If you’re interested in Life Science Analytics, Computational Biology, Decision Science, Machine Learning, or Robotics just to name a few, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.    For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

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