How to compete for top talent

 


Our latest salary and trends guide shows that many Data & Analytics skills are in high demand and continue to be scarce, so how do you ensure you get the best candidates to join your organization over the competition?
Unemployment is still relatively high in the UK, yet many great jobs are going unfilled. Most companies we are working with aren't complaining about the lack of applicants; they're often concerned about the quality, as often the best of the best are currently only on the job market for such a short time.

Real talent will be looking for a profitable company where they can build their careers and get paid market value. Other factors that influence individuals to accept a position in a company include structuring a role to suit ‘me’, individual training, customized career paths, workforce flexibility in terms of hours, tailored benefits packages and performance related remuneration. So with those factors in mind, here are some suggestions to ensure you have the best possible chance to secure the best individuals for your Data & Analytics vacancies:



Make Their Career Aims Your Priority

Offer the Best of Both Worlds

Listen to Their Needs

Appeal to Their Lifestyle

Focus on Your Mission and Culture

Become a “destination employer”

Widen your Horizons



Make Their Career Aims Your Priority

Without big budgets or maybe a product or service that is not considered cutting edge or glamorous, it's tough to compete with big brands and exciting product ranges. But you can cut through a lot of that by placing a degree of emphasis on the work aims and ambitions of individuals.  Finding out what candidates want from their careers and trying to make that happen for them could be a really powerful tool for hiring and retaining top talent. And it doesn't cost you a penny!

Offer the Best of Both Worlds

Companies often don't take the time to understand why certain people choose to participate in a new or recently launched business over choosing to work for more established companies. These individuals want freedom and autonomy to create something and be in right at the start. So if you’re in the ‘established’ category, to compete for creative talent, you will need to take your core success and provide an environment that supports and rewards the freedom and innovation these individuals crave.

Listen to Their Needs

Treat talent acquisition just as you do client or customer acquisition. Know the type of individual you want to target, go find them, learn what they need and meet those needs. Too often organizations recruit in safe mode with a “here we are and here's why you should join us” attitude. Dialogue is vitally important, so talk to key potential candidates as soon as you’ve identified them, listen to their needs and shape your offering accordingly.

Appeal to Their Lifestyle

In recent years, a very high percentage of employees reports their workloads have grown, as budgets are cut and staff headcount is frozen or reduced.  So many individuals are increasingly becoming discontented and disengaged. Long working hours are a given in the UK now so how do you combat that? Create attractive compensation packages and offer lifestyle benefits like flexi-time, for example as even the most driven employees need to enjoy life outside of work.

 

Focus on Your Mission and Culture

Despite the supposed talent shortage, fast growing companies can absolutely recruit the best workers. Focus on your mission and culture as increasingly, individuals are more concerned with these than with anything else. You may not be able to match the salaries that large corporates can pay, but you can absolutely have an inspiring, world-changing mission and an open, transparent, fun culture that attracts the best and brightest. 

Become a “destination employer”

If a limited budget is a factor in your recruitment campaign, consider developing a brand with a reputation for helping employees build a long-term career. A decade ago, employers could fill jobs by promising a high salary, today, companies can't necessarily up the ante with their pay levels—but that's actually good news because today's employee wants more than just money. So build on this desire and create a reputation that your company offers a good opportunity to develop a career, not just a steppingstone onto more senior level roles. That does mean offering on-going training and career development, innovative compensation and benefits plans, coaching and mentoring, and other ways beyond salary to show employees that they're valued.

As organizations have become leaner, they've cut out a lot of steps in the career ladder, and it's harder to learn from someone with more experience when they aren't there to learn from. So you have to create a framework where people are going to get the opportunities they need.

Widen your Horizons

Finally, don't overlook people who have taken time away from the workforce, whether to raise a family, earn a degree or dabble in entrepreneurship, for example. These candidates are likely to be open to new opportunities—and if they're at a later stage in their career, they may also see it as a last chance to consolidate a reputation as coach and mentor.

In summary, high calibre talent is almost always employed or not available for long when they do look for new opportunities. So to recruit them, you may well need to change your recruitment strategy and introduce a more creative element to your candidate attraction to suit this emerging employment situation.




<< By Kat Heague >>

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Tips for your Data & Analytics Resume

Tips for your Data & Analytics Resume

So, you’re pursuing a career in Data & Analytics. The brilliant thing about this is you’re entering a fast-growing industry with the potential for a great salary. But, unfortunately, this also means you’re probably entering into one of the most competitive fields out there right now.  The question is, how can you ensure your resume stands out from the crowd and impresses any potential employer?  Here are some top tips to help boost your Data & Analytics resume. Formatting is important It may seem obvious, but handing over a messy resume with no headings and massive blocks of text is no way to make a good first impression. Research suggests your resume is only looked at for a total of six seconds, so it’s important to make an impact on first glance.  Not only does this entail creating a well-presented document overall, but it also means paying attention to the small details such as structuring your resume to best emphasise the qualities and experience you think speak most highly of your ability to do the job well. This is why utilising a reverse chronological format is sometimes a worthwhile idea. For a highly competitive job in a Data & Analytics related field, where past experience is an important factor, beginning a resume with your most recent experience nearest the top will draw the eye and attention of the hiring manager reading it. Additionally, make sure your skills, qualifications, extra courses and impressive achievements are highlighted and clearly stated within the main body. As such, it’s better to use bullet points wherever possible instead of paragraphs and, consequently, you’ll find your resume a lot more compact and legible; in other words, much more likely to be read and remembered.  Quality over quantity  Having the most aesthetically pleasing resume in the world will mean nothing if the content doesn’t relate to the job you’re applying for. Again, this may sound obvious but it’s always worth combing through your resume to eliminate any irrelevant features and leave more space to talk about the things that matter.  Having a single page summarizing the most impressive contributions in your last role, or the most valuable insights gathered from a particular project you were involved with, is much more valuable than a multi-page essay about your volunteering with a local soccer club five years ago (unless, of course, your role heavily related to Data & Analytics). When introducing yourself, avoid long sentences and pronouns, and use impactful verbs when describing your achievements: for instance, try “instigated” instead of “started” and “spearheaded” instead of “led”. Also be sure to highlight and, where possible, quantify how your previous work in data/analytics benefitted your old company.  Know the value of your skillset It’s worth dedicating a section of your resume just to listing your most valuable skills as they relate to the job you want. However, make sure to be specific when describing your technical skills and experience with whichever tool you’re talking about. State your level of expertise and how you utilized said software to make your knowledge clear to whoever’s reading.  If you’re applying for an entry level position, however, and don’t have much experience or technical skills yet, it’s important to show off whichever skills you already have and how they  will make you a great addition. It’s worth researching which of your more general skills are the most sought after by employers, and then gaining an understanding of which ones best relate to the job you’re trying to get. For jobs working in Data Science, for instance, maths skills, analytical skills and problem solving are well worth mentioning. Ultimately, you want this section to contain a comprehensive, impressive sounding, and accurate, list of your most relevant skills.   If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to find out more:  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. This guest blog was provided by check-a-salary. 

Big Data In Politics – Win, Lose, Or Draw

Big Data In Politics – Win, Lose, Or Draw

In the movie Definitely, Maybe starring Ryan Reynolds, there’s a scene in which he must sell tables for a political campaign dinner fundraiser. He makes call after call with no luck. Finally, in frustration, he speaks plainly and finds a connection between the politician and the prospective donor. In an instant, he understands. Make the connection and you can’t go wrong. This is the 90’s version of micro-targeting. Online advertising today has honed targeted Marketing to an art form and it’s infused every industry from Fisherman’s Wharf to Wall Street to Washington. Messages are crafted on detailed profiles of what makes us unique such as hopes, fears, dreams, emotional triggers, and more which is then taken out of the hands of humans. Enter such deep, personal details into automated technologies and you’ll get automated reactions. How did we get here? Ever since Cicero’s brother, Quintus, who approached politics with a do anything to win mindset, we’ve been working toward this point. But, when it comes to technological advances within politics, George Simmel put it best when he wrote around 1915, “the vast intensive and extensive growth of our technology…entangles us in a web of means, and means toward means, more and more intermediate stages, causing us to lose sight of our real ultimate ends.”  What does this mean? It means we have moved so quickly and with such intensity as we push inwards while reaching outward, we get tangled up in our own systems. Before we know it, it’s difficult to separate the means from their ends, and we lose sight of our purpose. In other words, it can be hard to keep our sense of direction with our constant distraction of tasks, systems, and processes. According to Simmel, this would soon morph into what he called a ‘fragmentary character.’ Like a mosaic, we put the pieces back together and assemble the bits to fit our concept of the world.   The Digitizing of Campaigns Traditional campaigning has traditionally looked much like the movie scene mentioned above with phone banks, whiteboards, and handmade signs. But, today, things are changing. Everyone has at least one smart device which can sync information in real time to a range of devices. Algorithms and predictive modeling help reduce the guesswork, though gut feeling and instinct still prevail. At least, for now. Our machines are learning how to learn about us and define what we believe and wish to see by historical Data, or rather our past behaviors. Where psychographic profiling meets micro-targeting. What was once only seen in the Marketing world has now entered politics. Just like marketers want to know what people are interested in, so to do politicians wish to know what voters think. To do this, both industries will study behavioral and attitudinal profiles to help understand a demographic better or discern a gap in the marketplace. In consumer research, companies rely on psychographic micro-targeting to reach smaller groups and individuals. The key question here is to ask is to what extent are politicians prepared to pass laws that restrict their own opportunities to know more about voters. Just as the next generation of voters are coming, so too are the next generation of tools being developed.  One Final Thought… Over the last 20 years or so, we have built an immense Data structure from mobile devices to social media to modelling processes and more. With this kind of connectivity combined with fragmentary media, the use of Data Analysis has a big role to play going forward. If we seek change in our political and social infrastructures, we will have to reimagine the structures currently in place. From algorithmic modelling to AI and Machine Learning, the possibilities for new ideologies has emerged blurring the lines between context and production in which Data underpins capitalism. As those in Data Analytics continue to pursue an uninterrupted (read: non-fragmentary) vision of the world, we find ourselves at a new stage in history of where both looking back and looking forward at the same time informs our future.   Where would you like to go? If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or contact one of our expert consultants to find out more:  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast Teams, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.

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