Hadoop Jobs in San Francisco

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Latest Jobs

Salary

US$220000 - US$250000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

Newark, New Jersey

Description

A global enterprise conglomerate in the financial services sector is looking to bring in a VP of Data Governance to join their Jersey office!

Salary

US$120000 - US$130000 per year

Location

New York

Description

Are you looking to join a biopharma company that accelerates bringing new compounds to the market?

Salary

US$120000 - US$135000 per year

Location

New York

Description

Are you a client facing BI Analyst with strong Tableau skills and the ability to talk to non-technical audiences?

Salary

US$190000 - US$200000 per annum

Location

New York

Description

Do you want to join a technology-focused health company aimed at improving patient care?

Salary

US$130000 - US$150000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

New York

Description

This SaaS platform leader is looking to bring in a Data Engineer to join their NYC engineering team!

Salary

US$120000 - US$130000 per annum

Location

New York

Description

Do you want to join a biopharma company that uses machine learning to accelerate bringing new compounds to the market?

Salary

US$150000 - US$170000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

New York

Description

Join one of our top clients in health tech in NYC to build out their data platform to enable Machine Learning!

Salary

US$130000 - US$140000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

Hartford, Connecticut

Description

An insurance business is looking for a data engineer to join their CT headquarters or work remotely!

Salary

US$160000 - US$170000 per year

Location

Boston, Massachusetts

Description

Do you want to migrate on-prem data to the cloud using AWS?

Salary

US$220000 - US$250000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

New York

Description

A Fortune 500 industry leader is looking to have a VP of Data Governance join their NYC office!

Salary

US$140000 - US$150000 per annum

Location

New York

Description

Do you want to join an artificial intelligence company that has designed market-disrupting applications for the better good?

Salary

US$160000 - US$170000 per annum

Location

Boston, Massachusetts

Description

If you are looking to join a company working with state-of-the-art technology and invests back into their employees, you have come to the right place.

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

How Machine Learning and AI Can Help Us See the Forest for the Trees

In the early days of 2020, Johns Hopkins, the CDC, the WHO, and a host of other public organizations banded together in collaboration. They were on a mission to ensure the world had real-time information to a virus that would forever chance the course of this year and the years to come. Which is great for those families with a computer in every home or every person with smartphone access. But what about the rest of the world? How do you ensure those people without access to basic needs lives can be improved? A health non-profit using AI and Machine Learning is aiming to do just this. But the Data is vast and the sheer numbers of people need to be corralled by someone into something the computers can read and make decisions on. Who would have thought Public Research and Data Science would come together in such a manner and in such an important time? Three Benefits of Data Science and Machine Learning in Healthcare According to a seminar given in September 2019, two research scientists explained to the CDC the promises and challenges using Big Data for public health initiatives. After explaining a few definitions and making correlations, the focus was soon on the benefits. The focus of Machine Learning is to learn data patterns.From the initial focus, patterns can then be validated to ensure they make sense.These patterns and validation of patterns can find links between seemingly uncorrelated factors such as the relationship between one’s environment and their genetics. To the scientists working with these scenarios, the decisions seem simple. Yet, when it comes to explaining them to laymen like policymakers, there can be a shift in understanding. This shift can lead to arbitrary and different findings which can affect medical decision making. Why? Could it be using Random Forests in linking the data could be confusing?  Data Classification is Not as Cut-and-Dried as a Work Flow or Org Chart If someone shows us a work flow or organizational chart, we understand immediately each task to be done in which order or who reports to whom. But in trying to link uncorrelated bits of information using decision trees, it can seem more like abstract art, more subjective than direct. Yet, it is those correlations which answer the bigger questions brought to bear by Research Scientists, Public Health Researchers, the Data Scientists, and AI working together to see the bigger picture. Decision trees, ultimately, are the great classifier. But there are a few things which need to be in place first. Yet, in the random forest model it’s not just one decision tree, it’s many. This is definitely a case where, if you done right, you will see the forest for the trees and at the same time be able to determine patterns in those trees. A bit counter-intuitive, but this is what stretches our minds to see correlations and patterns we might not see otherwise, don’t you think? So, what do you need to help make predictions?  Two Important Needs to Help Make Predictions Predictive power. The features you employ should make some sense. For example, without a basic knowledge of cooking, you can’t just throw random items from your refrigerator into a pot and expect it taste good. Unless of course, you’re making soup and all you have to do is add water.The trees and their predictions should be uncorrelated. If you’ve ever seen M. Night Shymalan’s Lady in the Water, there’s a little boy who can ‘read’ cereal boxes and tell a coherent story. A predictive coherent story. This is the layman’s version of random forests, their predictive nature, and ultimately, the scientists who can ‘read’ and explain the patterns. If you're looking for your first or next role in Big Data, Web Analytics, Marketing & Insight, Life Science Analytics, and more, check out our current vacancies or contact one of our recruitment consultants to learn more.   For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.   For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Why You Should Always Be Learning In Data Science: Tips From Kevin Tran

Last month we sat down with Kevin Tran, a Senior Data Scientist at Stanford University, to chat about Data Science trends, improvements in the industry, and his top tips for success in the market.  As one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices of 2019 within Data & Analytics. his thoughts on the industry regularly garner hundreds of responses, with debates and discussions bubbling up in the comments from colleagues eager to offer their input.  This online reputation has allowed him to make a name for himself, building out his own little corner of the internet with his expertise. But for Tran, it’s never been about popularity. “It’s not about the numbers,” he says without hesitation. “I don’t care about posting things just to see the number of likes go up.” His goal is always connection, to speak with others and learn from them while teaching from his own background. He’s got plenty of stories from his own experiences. For him, sharing is a powerful way to lead others down a path he himself is still discovering.  When asked about the most important lesson he’s learned in the industry, he says it all boils down to staying open to new ideas.  “You have to continue to learn, and you have to learn how to learn. If you stop learning, you’ll become obsolete pretty soon, particularly in Data Science. These technologies are evolving every day. Syntax changes, model frameworks change, and you have to constantly keep yourself updated.”  He believes that one of the best ways to do that is through open discussion. His process is to share in order to help others. When he has a realisation, he wants to set it in front of others to pass along what he’s learned; he wants to see how others react to the same problem, if they agree or see a different angle. It’s vital to consider what you needed to know at that stage. Additionally, this exchange of ideas allows Tran to learn from how others tackle the same problems, as well as get a glimpse into other challenges he may have not yet encountered.  “When I mentor people, I’m still learning, myself,” Tran confesses. “There’s so much out there to learn, you can’t know it all. Data Science is so broad." At the end of the day, it all comes down to helping each other and bringing humanity back to the forefront. In fact, this was his biggest advice for both how to improve the industry and how to succeed in it. It’s a point he comes back to with some regularity in his writing. “It doesn’t matter how smart you are, stay humble and respect everyone,” one post reads. “Everyone can teach you something you don’t know.” Treating people well, understanding their needs, and consciously working to see them as people instead of numbers or titles—this, Tran argues, is how you succeed in the business. To learn and grow, you must work with people, especially people with different skills and mindsets. Navigating your career is not all technical, even in the world of Data. “The thing that cannot be automated is having a heart,” he tells me sagely. Beyond this, Tran stresses the need for a solid foundation. The one thing you can’t afford to do is take shortcuts. You have to learn the practicalities and how to apply them, but to be strong in theory as well.  Understanding what is happening underneath the code will keep you moving forward. He compares knowing the tools to learning math with a calculator. “If you take the calculator away, you still need to be able to do the work. You need the underlying skills too, so that when you’re in a situation without the calculator, you can still provide solutions.” By constantly striving to collaborate and improve, Tran believes the Data industry has the best chance of innovating successfully.  If you’re looking for a new challenge in an innovative and collaborative environment, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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