Computer Vision Jobs in San Francisco

At Harnham, we understand the importance of a strong Computer Vision team who can develop bespoke algorithms and continuously innovate. We make it our mission to utilize our vast Data & Analytics knowledge to deliver a professional and quality experience.

View Computer Vision Jobs in San Francisco here now.

Latest Jobs

Salary

US$150000 - US$180000 per annum + negotiable

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

This is a new and exciting opportunity for a talented Senior Software Engineer to join a global leading business in the LiDAR space.

Salary

US$170000 - US$200000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

As a Senior Software Engineer for this company, you will build out a team in the autonomous driving space. Apply if you have experience with C++ Python & LiDAR

Salary

US$200000 - US$250000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

This position is for a Senior Software Engineer looking to work on cutting-edge perception technology at a leading autonomous vehicle company.

Salary

US$160000 - US$180000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

This company is working to create medical devices to detect & diagnose major health problems. This start-up seeks to make healthcare more accessible for all.

Salary

US$240000 - US$290000 per annum

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

This position is perfect for someone who wants to work in the autonomous vehicle space with a fast-growing and high-tech company. Apply today!

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

How Computer Vision Can Modernize American Infrastructure

What if we could imagine a city in which there were no traffic bottlenecks or jams? What if we could sail through tolls and park using an app? Could high-speed rail replace cars as our main means of transport commuting to and from work? Would travel apps with our faces, government IDs, and medical records launch us past the long security lines at the airport?  We already use computers to help us navigate our destinations, buy plane or train tickets, and in some cities, park using only our location and a credit card. Already a part of our day-to-day for many, computer vision is moving us along at a rapid rate.  Smart cities are changing the way we move Computer Vision is being used in a variety of ways and is modernizing our transportation infrastructure for a start. Using advanced technology, computers are learning to ‘see and hear’ and make informed decisions much as humans might to make our world more efficient and safer.  Below are just a few places Computer Vision is already in play in our communities: Traffic patternsTraffic signals – connected cameras watch for pedestrians as they monitor traffic flow. These connected cameras also help to optimize flow and reduce congestion.Street lamps – imagine saving electricity by dimming street lamp switches then turning them back on if movement is detected.Tolls – camera captures of your license plate billed to where it's registered and EZ Pass lanes – one pass to move across highways without slowing, stopping, or having to handle cash or coin.GPS warnings – red for stopped traffic, yellow for slowed trafficParking apps - in cities with significant parking issues such as limited space. Imagine using a location-based service parsed into zones and your credit card to not only find a parking spot more easily, but to guarantee your car won’t be towed or mishandled.Clear ID - when traveling both domestically and internationallyHigh-speed rail - in some cities and talks under way for more. Commuter trains are moving beyond New York and Chicago to other cities such as Atlanta, Detroit, and Dallas just to name a few. These are just a few ways cities are being modernized for individuals. But what about on a grander scale? With the increase of online orders and demand for delivery in the last year or two, it’s estimated that over 1 million packages were delivered in New York each day. Extrapolate that to the other 49 states and the amount of traffic on the road that is strictly for deliveries soon overtakes that of individual commuters. Computer Vision is Solving for Delivery Congestion For many downtowns, parking can be a bear. Especially if you have a delivery van or truck. Where do you park to make your deliveries? Remember, you’re on a deadline. All. The. Time. What if a car is parked in your loading zone? What if there’s too much traffic to park? What had once plagued urban roadways was now a bone of contention to deliver products in a timely manner. On the more negative side of these frustrations, parking revenue was virtually eliminated as the larger companies absorbed the costs into their cost of doing business. No one was getting anywhere fast. Enter Computer Vision technology. Once the reason behind the problem was understood, cities could begin to plan for a solution. This technology could be used to help city planners understand curbside activity so they could tailor their plans based on their cities’ needs. With the proper data to make more informed decisions, cities can plan locations for passenger parking, ride-hailing lots, and delivery only zones to make more efficient use of people’s parking needs. Next Steps Toward a Modernized Infrastructure Curb management is just one of the options that America is working on to modernize its infrastructure. Making traffic patterns and flow more efficient is another. Imagine a plan in which pedestrians, drivers, cyclists, commuters, and delivery fleets can safely share the road while also investing in clean energy solutions. Adding in infrastructure plans to also help combat climate change makes it a win-win for everyone. If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies or contact one of our expert consultants to learn more.  For our West Coast Team, contact us at (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com.  For our Mid-West and East Coast teams contact us at (212) 796-6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com.  

Reflections On The Watermark Conference For Women

This week I was fortunate enough to head down to the Watermark Conference for Women alongside our SVP, Stephanie Brooks. As we enter 2020 and women continue to shatter glass ceilings, Harnham firmly believe in a proactive approach towards placing more women in Data & Tech roles.  Diversity and inclusion are integral to our story and core beliefs and we strive to continually re-evaluate how we create measurable change in the marketplace and redefine the metrics of successful and excellent recruitment. For us, attending the conference was a chance to meet and learn from some of those women who are leading the way. Every talk inspired me in some way but there were a couple I really connected with, and I wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on how they impact the work we do at Harnham. WHAT IS WATER? One talk that struck a chord with me was Seth Godin’s breakfast keynote, inspired by a commencement speech by David Foster Wallace in which he famously tells a story of two fish out at sea. The story goes: “There are these two young fish swimming along and they happen to meet an older fish swimming the other way, who nods at them and says ‘Morning, boys. How’s the water?’ And the two young fish swim on for a bit, and then eventually one of them looks over at the other and goes ‘What the hell is water?’”. Godin’s speech was meditated on how attitudes and beliefs are the indicators of future success. In his speech, Godin echoed Wallace’s sentiment that “freedom involves attention and awareness and discipline, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them over and over in a myriad of ways every day.” Recruitment is an industry where it is easy to swim along without questioning what water or recruitment really is. To question what is water - what is recruitment - requires thoughtful analysis, careful consideration, and of course, “attention, awareness, and discipline”. As the global leaders of Data & Analytics recruitment, we remind ourselves daily that we are responsible for making meaningful change. Water is, to us, what we make of it.  For Seth, his water is marketing. For Harnham, our water is recruitment and we stand by Wallace’s challenge to stay conscious and alive in our jobs. Day in and day out Harnham will continue to make the case for agency recruitment to be diverse and inclusive, as this is in the best economic interest of our clients.   THE ECONOMY OF DIVERSITY One of the most insightful and compelling moments of the day was a conversation between Pat Mitcheel and Indra Nooyi, the former chair and CEO of PepsiCo. Having directed the company’s global strategy for more than a decade, Nooyi is uniquely poised to discuss the importance and power of having women in every capacity within an organization.  During the conversation, she highlighted the statistics that measure the success companies achieve when women have equal representation at all levels. Currently, gender parity exists in entry-level positions but is absent in the 2nd and 3rd tiers of the workforce. While Nooyi highlighted that having a diverse and inclusive workplace should be an integral part of every company’s corporate social responsibility, she argued that this also leads to unprecedented economic growth. This aligns closely with our view of Diversity at Harnham, something which we examined in more detail in our Diversity Report.  For Nooyi, in making the case for the economics of diversity, she used the work of care economists to show how implementing policies that affected the unique interests of women are proven to not only keep women in the workforce and draw them back to work after children but are also shown to increase the economic output of countries. Institutional change at the corporate level and policies focused on those who have care-giving responsibilities have been shown to positively influence economic growth and increase the happiness and productivity of workers.  BREAKING OUT  As a woman working in a fast-paced and competitive environment, I also took a number of insights from the various break-out sessions held throughout the day. Here are a few highlights:  Women Breaking Barriers: Michelle P. King, Andrea McBride John, Pat Mitchell, Samantha Rapoport Find a mentor, be a mentor. Find a sponsor, be a sponsor. Find a sister, be a sister.Take up space and own it Share your successes with the women and men around you Building a Network of Relationships, Not Just Contacts: Laura Okmin Focus on asking people who they are, not what they do Reach out when you don’t need anything, maintain relationships  The Myth of the Nice Girl Nice people build  trust, trust is the foundation of all business relationships You don’t have to choose between kindness and strength If you want to break glass ceilings, we may have an opportunity for you. Take a look at our latest roles or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  For our West Coast Team, call (415) 614 - 4999 or send an email to sanfraninfo@harnham.com. For our Mid-West and East Coast Team, call (212) 796 - 6070 or send an email to newyorkinfo@harnham.com. 

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