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Wenn es um fachspezifische Anliegen geht, weiß Harnham worauf es ankommt. Jahrelange Erfahrung hat es uns ermöglicht, uns profundes Wissen im Bereich Data & Analytics Recruitment anzueignen.

Seit unserer Gründung im Jahr 2006 in London konnten wir stetig wachsen und weitere Standorte in Europa und den USA eröffnen. Dabei haben bewährte Methoden den Grundstein für unseren Erfolg gelegt. Diese Methoden haben wir für den deutschen Markt angepasst, um stets die regionalen Bedürfnisse der Bewerber und Klienten zu bedienen.

Wenn es um die Vermittlung von Positionen im Bereich Data Science, Big Data, Business Intelligence, Digital Analytics, Marketing Insight oder ähnlichen Vakanzen geht, sind wir aufgrund unserer Expertise die beste Anlaufstelle.

Wir belassen es nicht einfach dabei die Position zu besetzen, sondern möchten auch Ihre Vorgaben und Visionen verstehen, um so eine langjährige Beziehung aufzubauen. Neben unseren hohen Qualitätsstandards setzen wir auf Transparenz, sodass Sie stets an unserem Marktwissen teilhaben können.

Wir helfen Ihnen gerne und freuen uns, von Ihnen zu hören. Sie erreichen uns unter: +49 69 677 33 567 an um mehr zu erfahren.

 

  JOB SPOTLIGHT



  Senior Digital Analyst (m/w)

  Sind Sie bereit für eine neue
  Herausforderung im Onlinehandel?
  Dann ist die Stelle als
  Senior Digital Analyst bei einem renommierten
  e-commerce Unternehmen in Berlin
  genau das Richtige für Sie.  


  SIEHE JOB


ANSPRECHPARTNER




ERLEBEN SIE HARNHAM!




 

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

How NLP Is Redefining The Future Of Tech

How NLP Is Redefining The Future Of Tech

During the last half of the past decade the importance of Data reached a level at which it was coined “the new oil”. This was indicative of a shift in the practices of individuals and businesses, highlighting how they now rely on something which isn’t measurable in gallons but in bytes. However,  because we can’t physically see the Data we generate, gather and store, its easy to lose our connection to it.  This is where NLP is comes into play. With the purpose of helping computers understand our languages, NLP (Natural Language Processing) gained an increased importance over the last couple of years. But, more than teaching a computer how to speak, NLP can make sense of patterns within a text, from finding the stylistic devices of a piece of literature, to understanding the sentiment behind it.  So, with NLP set to become even more prevalent over the next decade, here are some of the ways in which it’s already being put to use:  EXTRACTION Like an advanced version of using Ctrl + F to search a document, NLP can instantly skim through texts and extract the most important information. Not only that, but NLP algorithms are able to find connections between text passages and can generate statistics related to them. Which leads me to my next example: TEXT CLASSIFICATION  This is fairly self-explanatory: NLP algorithms can parameters to categorise texts into certain categories. You’ll find this used frequently in the insurance industry, where businesses use NLP to organise their contracts and categorise them the same way newspapers categorise their articles into different subcategories. And, closer to home, it’s similar algorithms that keep your inbox free from spam, automatically detecting patterns which are heavily used by spammers. But NLP does more than just look for key words, it can understand the meaning behind them:  SENTIMENT ANALYSIS Sentiment Analysis takes the above understanding and classification and applies a knowledge of subtext, particularly when it comes to getting an indication of customer satisfaction.  For example, Deutsche Bahn are using Sentiment Analysis to find out why people are unhappy with their experience whilst Amazon are using it to keep tabs on the customer service levels of their sellers. Indeed, Facebook have taken this one step further and, rather than just tracking satisfaction levels, they are examining how users are organising hate groups and using the data collected to try and prevent them mobilising.  With the advancement of Machine Learning and technological developments like quantum computing, this decade could see NLP’s understanding  reach a whole level, becoming omnipresent and even more immersed in our daily lives: PERSONAL AI ASSISTANTS The popularity of using personal AI-based assistants is growing thanks to Alexa and Google Assistant (Siri & Cortana not so much, sorry). People are getting used to talking to their phones and smart devices in order to set alarms, create reminders or even book haircuts.  And, as we continue to use these personal assistants more and more, we’ll need them to understand us better and more accurately. After decades of using generic text- or click inputs to make a computer execute our commands, this decade our interactions with computers need to involve into a more “natural” way of communicating. But these advances are not just limited to voice technologies. Talking and texting with machines, the way we would with friends, is increasingly realistic thanks to advances in NLP: CHATBOTS Since companies have realised that they can answer most generic inquiries using an algorithm, the use of chatbots has increased tenfold.  Not only do these save on the need to employee customer service staff, but many are now so realistic and conversational that many customers do not realise that they are engaging with an algorithm.  Plus, the ability to understand what is meant, even when it is not said in as many words, means that NLP can offer a service that is akin to what any individual can.  If you’re interested in using NLP to fuel the next generation of technical advancements, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of expert consultants to find out more. 

Harnham Launch 2020 Data & Analytics Salary Survey

Harnham Launch 2020 Data & Analytics Salary Survey

I'm excited to announce the launch of our 9th annual Salary Survey.  Covering salaries, diversity, benefits and technologies, our published Salary Guide is known for reflecting and driving trends within the Data & Analytics industry. As ever, we can't put together our guide without your input, so we are extremely grateful to everyone who is able to take part.  This year, one participant will win a £500 Amazon Voucher (or an equivalent amount in your local currency). You can read all the terms and conditions for this here.  The survey takes around 10 minutes and we would love to hear your thoughts. All submissions are 100% confidential and will only be used to provide an overview of the industry as a whole.  You can choose the survey relevant to you below: UK Survey US Survey EU/EEA Survey In the meantime, you can download a copy of last year's completed Salary Guide here.  We look forward to sharing our latest results with you later in the year. 

What Will Happen In The World Of Data & Analytics In 2020?

What Will Happen In The World Of Data & Analytics In 2020?

The New Year, and the new decade, have arrived. The past ten years saw Data move to the forefront of public conversation following a number of big leaks and controversies. But, realistically, the impact of the ease of access to a surplus Big Data has only just begun to be felt.  Whilst many are predicting what the world will look like by the end of the 2020s, discussing how far AI will have come and the consequences of automation on the job market, we’ve decided to look a little closer to home.  With that in mind, here are a few trends we expect to see over the next year.   ACCESS TO DATA SCIENCE WILL BECOME EASIER Data Scientists have traditionally been limited in number, a key group of individuals with PhDs, honed skills, and a vast understanding of Data & Analytics. However, with the advent of a number of new tools, more and more users will be able to perform Data Science tasks. However, many of the more sophisticated processes are still far from being replicated, so those currently working in this area shouldn’t be concerned. In fact, the more standard tasks that can be automated, the more time Data Scientists will have to experiment and innovate.  THE 5G EXPLOSION  Whilst there may have been a soft launch last year, the introduction of 5G will have a much more significant impact over the next year. With a flurry of compatible mobile devices around, and many more expected to come, we’re likely see 5G networks hit the mainstream.  In the world of Data, this is likely to have a huge impact on how businesses use the Cloud. Indeed, with mobile upload and download speeds set to be so fast, there is a chance that an online middle-system may no longer be as necessary as it once was.  THE RISE OF THE EDGE On the subject of the Cloud, it’s worth talking about Edge Computing. No, this has nothing to do with the pizza or the guitarist. Edge Computing has been a trend for a few years now, but, following an announcement from AWS, it looks set to become much more prevalent in 2020.  Concerned with moving processing away from the Cloud and close to the end-user, Edge Computing is already beginning to have an impact across a number of industries.  A NEED FOR AUGMENTED ANALYTICS It’s no surprise that the use of AI, Machine Learning and NLP is set to increase over the next year, so it shouldn’t come as a shock that Augmented Analytics are set to become more popular too.  The opportunities, and extra time, offered by using the automated decision making offered by Augmented Analytics are the perfect fit for the increasing number of organisations who find themselves with more Data than processing capabilities.  DATA WILL HELP FIGHT THE CLIMATE CRISIS  Whilst there is a fair argument that the amount of processing required by the world of Data & Analytics is detrimental to the climate, the benefits any insights can offer are likely to outweigh any negative impact.  Indeed, the UK government are already using Satellite Data to help reduce the impact of flooding, whilst Google’s EIE is being used to map carbon emissions with a view to better plan future cities. Given the recent, and tragic, bushfires in Australia, this is going to become an even more pressing issue over the next 12 months.  If you want to be at the forefront of the latest innovations in Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you.  Take a look at our latest opportunities, or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out how we can help you. 

HOW AI AFFECTS US FROM JOURNALISM TO POLITICS

How AI Affects Us from Journalism to Politics

It’s been nearly 40 years since the War Games movie was released. Remember the computer voice, JOSHUA, who asked the infamous, “Would you like to play a game?”. The computer had been programmed to learn. You might call it a forerunner of Artificial Intelligence (AI) today. Except AI is no longer the little boy who becomes a stand-in for a grieving family. Now, we’re no longer watching a movie about AI, we’re living in its times. But unlike a movie, we won’t find a solution after 90-minutes to two hours. Now, we must be cautious and pay attention or we will be leapfrogged by our own inventions. Can we change course at this late stage? As we enter a new decade, let’s take a look at some of the concerns and solutions posed by Amy Webb, author of The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity.  How Did We Get Here? As Christmas approaches, we are cajoled by memories and makers to buy back our past and cement our futures with things. Our desires for instant gratification keep us from planning for AI properly. While it can be fun to watch AI play against Chess champions or worrisome to watch it direct our buying decisions, we remain secure in that its not yet to its full potential. But elements such as facial recognition and realistic generation cause concern for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is what will happen when systems make our choices for us. From the Big 5 of Tech to your local commercial or paper, our minds are already often made up. And even when we’re presented with the truth, we may not even realise it because our AI capabilities have grown exponentially and continue to grow making us wonder…what if? So, What Can We Do? Businesses, Universities, and the Media all have a part to play. And in our image-centric world, the greatest of these is Media. Universities can blend technical skills with soft skills and blend in degrees such as philosophy, cultural anthropology, and microeconomics just to name a few. The blending of these skills can offer a more robust understanding of the world around us.  Businesses can work to ensure a more diverse staff and improve inclusion. Shareholders and investors can help by slowing down when considering investments in AI to allow for determining risk and bias before moving forward. And when it comes to the Media, there’s general agreement the public needs greater media literacy. While AI-focused accusations of deepfakes in news and on television abound, there is a greater concern in that much of what people believe to be fake, isn’t. So, the question becomes, how does the media generate trust in a public that no longer believes what it  reads, sees, or hears?  It’s this casting of doubt which is the greater danger. Why? Because it requires no technology at all. While it’s best to be informed, it can be tricky to navigate in today’s world. So, it’s up to not only the news consumers, but is up to researchers, journalists, and platforms to separate the wheat from the chaff. Or in this case, the real from the fake before the news reaches its audience. From Socrates who taught his students to question what they learned to the students of the 20th century expected to remember only what was needed for a test; we have come full circle. But at a unique time in our world, in which the questioning has not much to do with challenging ourselves but is at best used to sow distrust.  While tech companies like Facebook and Google have jumped on the bandwagon to expose fakes, others are moving into how to build trust. Again. At best, these startups offer comparisons of videos and images as the human eye works to discern the difference.  But while tech may be advancing technological wonders by leaps and bounds, there remains a solid grounding of the human element. Humans are needed as content moderators to dispel fiction from truth. And in the media? There’s a renewed focus on training journalists to fact check, detect, and verify their stories. The human element adds a layer of nuance machines can’t yet emulate. If you’re interested in AI, Big Data and Digital or Web Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current opportunities, or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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