Global Leadership Team

View all team members and how to get in touch below

Executive Chairman

Partner

Senior Vice President & Partner - US East

Director - UK

Senior Vice President - US West

Vice President - US West

Senior Manager - Germany

Head of Operations

Senior Manager – Digital

Head of Finance

Head of Business Support

Legal and Compliance Manager

Latest jobs

Salary

£40000 - £45000 per annum

Location

London

Description

Financial institution is looking for an analyst to work on financial modelling and commercial analytics in their acquisitions team.

Reference:

101740/DA

Expires on
Salary

£60000 - £70000 per annum

Location

London

Description

Large Health insurance company looking for talented Data Engineers

Reference:

101806/DM2

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Salary

£50000 - £65000 per annum + competitive bonus + benefits

Location

London

Description

A fantastic opportunity to join a fast-growing team. If you're skilled in SQL, SAS, and Python, this is a great opportunity for an impactful role from day one.

Reference:

48373/RM

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Salary

500000kr - 700000kr per annum

Location

Oslo

Description

We're looking for a visually strong product designer with a genuine interest and enthusiasm for technology and digital media

Reference:

5645241

Expires on
Salary

£50000 - £60000 per annum + Benefits

Location

London

Description

As a Senior Analytics Consultant,this is an exciting opportunity to work on a consultancy basis with household names in the FMCG / retail sector.

Reference:

108622/db

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Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

The Five Ws Of Becoming A Data Scientist

The demand for Data Scientists has dramatically increased over the past five years. Research has shown that skills such as Data Science, SQL databases, Big Data and Machine Learning have been the most sought after by British employers in this period, with demand tripling by over 200 per cent.  This growth has been accelerated since the start of the pandemic. As businesses faced an unprecedented crisis, with no prior knowledge of how to manage, adapt or survive, leaders needed to turn to data to make informed business decisions to help them navigate the unknown.  Even though we are already now on the path to economic recovery, this need for data-driven knowledge won’t dissipate any time soon. From being able to create in-depth risk forecasts to gathering consumer sentiment, creating intelligent solutions, and using automation to reduce bottom-line costs; Data Science’s role will continue to be the backbone of success as companies steer through this ‘new normal’.  Nevertheless, despite the ever-growing appetite for Data Scientists and the number of available roles and opportunities escalating day-by-day, businesses are coming up against the brick wall of a shortage of specialists. According to IBM, Data Science roles remain unfulfilled for 45 days or longer and the UK is having to combat a £2bn Data skills shortage.  So, as a student, graduate or current Data Scientist looking to move into a more niche role, what are the key traits, skills and experiences, or the five Ws, you need to have to ensure you not only land your dream job, but help plug the increasing skills gap? Who can be a Data Scientist? Anyone can train to become a Data Scientist, and the industry is working hard at improving its attraction and retention of a diverse workforce.  Despite traditionally being a very male-dominated sector, research Harnham undertook in August 2020 found that Data & Analytics’ gender divide is slowly but surely closing. 30 per cent of women now make up the industry, a big leap from 18 per cent in 2019.  What skills do you need? Data Scientists are traditionally required to have at least an undergraduate Bachelors’ degree, usually across science, technology, or statistics. However, the majority will continue to go on to get a Master’s (88 per cent) or PHD (46 per cent) level qualifications.   Nonetheless, as more businesses have become attuned to how this level of education can cause significant gaps in the number of diverse candidates, other routes into the industry have been made available, such as apprenticeships and work experience.  Technical skills will also stand you in brilliant stead, from coding languages to machine learning and AI techniques. While not a must-have, a lot of employers, especially post-COVID, will be looking to hire talent that can get started without too much training.  When should I apply for a role? In this new normal, as mentioned, employers are looking for candidates who are ‘work-ready’. So, to position yourself above the rest of the competition, make sure you apply for roles when your skills and knowledge are at the highest standard they can be.    Where could I work as a Data Scientist? The pandemic has completely skewed the normal working routines of most industries, but especially Data Science. Whereas, usually, the most attractive jobs would be based in London, now, with the correct equipment and support in place, those working within the field can work from anywhere, paving the way for a much more flexible workforce and a steep increase in remote working.   Why should I work as a Data Scientist? As a Data Scientist, you’ll never be short for opportunities. As more and more businesses look to implement Data Science into their working model to help make data-driven decisions which not only provide clarity but help reduce costs and positively affect the bottom-line, demand for skilled professionals will only grow.   Of course, job security isn’t the only perk of becoming a Data Scientist: You can also expect to receive a competitive salary.You’ll be part of an exciting and ever-evolving industry, no two days will ever be the same.Your skillset will mean you’re never limited – the business world is your oyster!  Data Science is an extremely varied career path to take, and its role within society has grown vastly, especially over the past year. For anyone looking to enter the industry, plug the skills gap or embark on something completely new, this could be a step in the right direction for you.  If you're interested in working in Data Science, or building out your team, we may be able to help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

How Can Organisations Tap Into The Huge Pool Of Neurodiverse Data Talent?

Ensuring that our workplaces are thriving with a diverse range of talent is, rightly, a topic that many organisations are focussing on. Yet, for the most part, this dialogue is centred around gender, ethnicity, sexuality and perhaps even physical disability. It is fairly uncommon therefore to see close attention given to exploring the challenges surrounding neurodiversity in organisations around the globe. Generally speaking, the term neurodiversity encompasses autism, attention deficit disorders, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and other neurological conditions. To hear a range of diverse viewpoints and perspectives is to contribute to an inclusive society and organisation. Leaving neurodiversity aside is no longer acceptable. Our research in the US highlights how 26 per cent of US adults have some form of disability, yet disabled individuals only account for 3.5 per cent of those working in Data & Analytics. As the global skills shortage worsens, it stands to reason that businesses will want to access this previously untapped talent pool. We know that in the UK, 56 per cent of organisations continue to experience skills shortages and in the US, two-thirds of employers hiring for full-time, permanent employees say they can’t find qualified talent to fill open jobs. An often-overlooked area of diversity is the impact a disability can have on an individual’s professional career. It’s no secret that all organisations would like to construct the best team – but are you doing enough to consider underrepresented talent? Creating a smooth recruitment and interview process One of the first barriers that neurodiverse candidates may encounter when seeking to enter an organisation is the recruitment and interview process. For these individuals, undergoing testing in this way puts pressure on communication skills, a tool that often allows us to better understand, connect and empathise with one another. When it comes to the recruitment process, the traditional in-person interview process — which assesses communication skills and personality fit — can be difficult to negotiate for neurodiverse candidates. In fact, this can be said to have been heightened by the pandemic too. The switch to virtual interviewing has added a new challenge to how neurodiverse candidates are able to participate in the process as miscommunication and interruptions come into the picture. For employers, tapping into the pool of data professionals with these invisible disabilities requires them to take the stress out of the interview and assessment process. It is critical to consider someone’s potential ability to do the job and the core skills that they have linking directly to the role on offer. Onboard a successful neurodiverse candidate efficiently Regardless of the size of an organisation, from global corporation to growing SME, they all share the same need to onboard new hires successfully and with limited disruption. It is this process that begins the relationship between an employee and an employer and although there will have been interactions through the recruitment process, it is the initial welcome into the organisation that will set the tone for the relationship moving forward. For neurodiverse employees this can be a daunting prospect; meeting new people while also familiarising themselves with a new environment and routine requires ongoing support and help from the employer. There are a number of ways that organisations can make this easier, from in-person or virtual meetings with smaller groups of the team to scheduled one-to-one chats with colleagues, the first few steps can be made more comfortable by promoting an inclusive culture. However, as there are such wide-ranging differences between neurodiverse conditions and individual requirements, employers need to implement policies that are tailored and highly individualised. Creating such policies and programmes can be complex and time-consuming, but it is critical to include your team in this. Ultimately it will boost your bottom line and the array of perspectives and views that are shared within the organisation. Retaining neurodiverse employees Neurodiverse candidates are capable, intelligent and have creative-thinking minds. To ensure their tenure within an organisation is lengthy and successful, we need to support these professionals and equip them with the tools and support they need to thrive. A standardised approach will not satisfy every need, and so it is important that every person in your organisation is accommodated as far as possible. The importance of this could not be clearer, as the BIMA Tech Inclusion & Diversity Report details how neurodivergent employees are more likely to be impacted by poor mental health (84 per cent against 49 per cent for neurotypical workers). This suggests that beyond attracting neurodiverse talent into the organisation, employers need to focus on the quality of the experience within the team. For example, take the time to book in regular meetings between the employee and their line manager. This will ensure that projects run smoothly, and any concerns or questions can be raised in a controlled environment. Listen to your team and their lived experiences to make informed and accurate plans to facilitate their growth within the team. After all, each employee brings a set of unique skills to a company. As more organisations realise the benefits of hiring neurodivergent candidates into their teams, employers have to act quickly to make routes into the business as accessible as possible. Ultimately, hiring neurodiverse people makes complete business sense. We know that diverse teams perform better, so now is the time to step up and tap into the huge pool of neurodiverse data talent. If you’re in the world of Data & Analytics and looking to take a step up or find the next member of your team, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.