Software engineer jobs

What We Do

From Data Science start-ups, to global Travel and Financial corporations, we help the best Software Engineering talent find rewarding careers.

As the scale and complexity of data increases, Software Engineers have become essential players in creating information solutions. The need to build end to end systems that turn data into products has seen a sharp increase in demand for these roles.

Developers working in Python, Scala, and Java, as well as Dev Ops professionals, are now amongst some of the most sought-after talent in the industry. 

hOW We Do IT 

Our specialist Software Engineering team work with companies handling high-volume data systems and in complex data-centric organisations.

From trading platforms that utilise Machine Learning to offer a competitive edge, to websites that handle the data of millions of customers, the diverse range of jobs on offer reflects the demand for these roles.

If you’re looking for new opportunities, get in touch to find out how we can help with your search.

Latest Jobs

Salary

£30000 - £60000 per annum + Benefits

Location

Cambridgeshire

Description

Mid-Level/Senior DevOps Engineer role for an advanced medical research firm. Cutting edge technology and life-saving projects.

Salary

US$180000 - US$240000 per year + Additional Benefits

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Forward thinking start-up with a focus on enabling better patient care are looking for an experienced DevOps Engineer to join their team.

Salary

US$170000 - US$240000 per year + Benefits

Location

San Francisco, California

Description

Forward thinking start-up with a focus on enabling better patient care are looking for an experienced DevOps Engineer to join their team.

Salary

£55000 - £65000 per annum + Medical, Pension, Holidays and More

Location

Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

Description

As a DEVOPS ENGINEER you will be playing a key part in this medical research/advancement firms life-saving projects.

Salary

£85000 - £110000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

London

Description

Join one of the largest travel companies worldwide, in their fastest growing and most profitable team.

Salary

£30000 - £60000 per annum

Location

London

Description

Are you looking for a new exciting roles to create data pipelines and work along side some of the best Data Engineers in their field?

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Why it is hard to build a Big Data team

Why it is hard to build a Big Data team

Increasingly, I speak to managers who are adopting big data tools and developing PoCs to prove how they can make use of them. Just last week I spoke to a data architect who mentioned that if he didn’t get exposure to big data tech sooner rather than later, his current RDBMS skills may become redundant within the next few years. While that is likely an exaggeration, it is certainly an interesting point. Companies that would have never previously had the capability to interpret ‘Big Data’ are now exploring a variety of NoSQL platforms. In particular, the massive performance benefits gained from Spark and real-time/streaming tools have opened up a whole new world beyond just MapReduce. I don’t claim to be a data engineer, but as a recruiter for this sector, what I do is spend all day, every day interacting with big data developers, architects and managers (as well as keeping a close eye on the latest Apache incubator projects). Due to this, I have seen some recurring themes that have become trends when companies look to create and build their big data teams that are coming to the fore. Candidate demand The demand for Big Data professionals is very much a present day issue as the data companies have grand plans for is waiting for the right data developer to use the best tech to extract valuable insights from it. The best candidates receive massive interest, often gain multiple offers from a range of companies. Your business is now no longer just competing with large corporations such as Facebook, Twitter or Yahoo. Startups and SMEs are also vying for the best candidates. Candidates are seeing pay rises twice that of the normal rate, as illustrated in our salary guide. Candidate shortage The number of candidates with hands-on, production level Big Data experience is incredibly limited. We go to great lengths to find the candidates who can add real value to companies. The growth and exciting future for the big data industry has led to increased interest in big data jobs, particularly for those from RDBMS or software. engineering backgrounds. This leaves the industry in a difficult predicament: high demand + low supply = massive competition. There are countless examples of companies that have failed to recruit a Big Data team after a year of looking. Competition to get ahead and stand out Planning - Companies need to have a data road map detailing their future plans. Candidates want to clearly know what they are getting into and what to expect from a job. Innovation - Why get stuck on batch processing? The most exciting positions that candidates love are in data innovations teams, playing with real-time/streaming tech and new languages. Personal development, growth and training – with the data science market experiencing similar growth, many big data engineers are looking for a job that not only offers the chance to work with machine learning and similar fields; but training, mentoring towards clear career progression as standard. Speed – the length of the interview process is often seen as a reflection of the amount of red tape developers have to go through to get a job. The longer and more convoluted the process, the more put off some people may be. Complacency – don’t rest on your laurels, it’s unlikely that you’ll get 10s of CVs through when you are looking to fill a data role, so when you find a candidate you like, move swiftly to show your interest to them as quality candidates don’t come around often. By implementing these small but effective improvements to your recruiting process and how you develop data talent will see you create a team that is a success in this ever more digital analytics landscape. Companies who don’t create and nurture strong, dynamic teams will fall by the wayside. It’s Harnham’s job to help you achieve this goal. Get in touch with us to tell you how. T: (020) 8408 6070 E: info@harnham.com

 Hiring a BI Manager – Trends and Challenges

Hiring a BI Manager – Trends and Challenges

With all the talk of big data and data science being able to predict what colour shirt I will buy in four years’ time (probably white or blue for those who don’t know me!), effective business intelligence is sometimes passed by or considered old news. The reality is that companies are realising that they can get much more from their business intelligence and are changing their strategies to deliver interactive, insight-driven and visualised reports. Not every data-driven decision needs machine learning algorithms behind it, and quality business intelligence enables all managers to be effective decision-makers. These strategies are creating some obvious trends in the market, resulting in a change in expectations when hiring a BI Manager. Key BI TrendsData Visualisation – Companies of all sizes are implementing Qlikview and Tableau (amongst many other tools) to create attractive, interactive visualisations, to harness intelligence, in a way that will capture attention in a presentation. Insight Driven - A BI professional can’t simply develop automated reports anymore. Analysts are often required to offer suggestions for business change and present insight to decision makers. Hands-on Management – BI managers and even heads of business intelligence are expected to keep coding well into their management years, with the logic that problems can be spotted quicker when they are in the trenches, coupled with strategic and line management work. Data Ambassadors – BI professionals are becoming door-to-door data sellers, coaching teams in a business on the benefits of using data to optimise their teams and decisions to save or bring in more money. Heads are in the Cloud – Companies are using cloud-based data warehouses such as Redshift to save on storage costs, whilst creating a centralised data warehouse for BI. Alternative Data Sources – Companies are looking to use the web and social media data, alongside numerous other sources to generate deep insights for managers. The BI Manager EffectI am completely sold that all of these features represent the future of business intelligence. The few companies that are doing all of the above well enough, are doing advanced work in the area and these companies will be leveraging big commercial gains from their business intelligence teams. The problem is that only a few businesses are doing all of the above, so only a handful of professionals have the relevant experience, and as a result expect top dollar to bring all of those skills. Therefore, it is prudent to be flexible with your hiring requirements. Look for a bright, passionate candidate, who can readily grasp the shift in business intelligence trends, and is keen to plug skills gaps. An enthusiastic business intelligence professional will get up to speed with whatever they were missing. Don’t be too quick to dismiss those who are not ready-made BI managers on paper. Message to CandidatesFor all aspirational or existing business intelligence managers and leaders, I would advise you try to stay hands on as long as possible. I know some of you dream of never seeing a line of SQL code again, however, the trend in hiring for hands-on business intelligence management positions means that keeping your tech skills sharp will really keep your options open moving forward. It would be great to hear your experiences, so please feel free to comment below on the trends you see in your business. Have you needed to remain hands on as you progress within your career? Or are you looking for a multi-skilled BI manager, and it is proving hard?

Recently Viewed jobs