Site and Cookie Policy



Site Policy

Access to and use of the Harnham website is subject to the following terms and conditions.


Copyright

Copyright ©  Harnham 2013. All rights reserved. All copy and other intellectual property rights in all text, images, sounds, software and other materials on this site are owned by Harnham, or are included with permission of the relevant owner.

You are permitted to browse this site and to reproduce extracts by way of printing, downloading to a hard disk and by distribution to other people but in all cases, for non-commercial, informational and personal purposes only. No reproduction of any part of this site may be sold or distributed for commercial gain, nor shall it be modified or incorporated in any other work, publication or site. No other licence or right is granted.


Trademarks

All trademarks displayed on this site are either owned or used under licence by Harnham.


Contents

The information on this site has been included in good faith but is for general informational purposes only. It should not be relied on for any specific purpose and no representation or warranty is given as regards its accuracy, completeness or fitness for any particular purpose. Save to the extent that such limitation is not permitted under English Law Harnham, nor any of it's employees shall be liable for any loss, damage or expense arising in contract, tort or otherwise out of any reliance on information contained in this site, access to or use of or inability to use this site or any site linked to it including, without limitation, any loss of profit, indirect, incidental or consequential loss.


Use

Your information and activity on this site must not:

  • be false, inaccurate or misleading
  • be in breach of any applicable laws, regulations, licences, or third party rights
  • interfere in any way with the proper working of this site, and in particular you must not circumvent security, tamper with, hack into or disrupt the operation of the site or surreptitiously intercept, access without authority or expropriate any system, date or personal information as defined in the Data Protection Act 1998.

This site is intended normally to be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week.
You agree to fully reimburse Harnham in respect of all losses, costs, actions, claims, and liabilities incurred by Harnham as a result of any breach or non-observance by you of these terms or any data submitted by you to us.

Harnham will make all reasonable attempts to exclude viruses (and similar destructive devices) from the site but cannot guarantee the exclusion of viruses (and similar destructive devices), and you should take appropriate steps in respect of this risk.


Linked sites

At various points throughout the site, you may be offered automatic links to other internet sites relevant to a particular aspect of this site. This does not indicate that Harnham are necessarily associated with any of these other sites or their owners. While it is the intention of Harnham that you should find these other sites of interest, neither Harnham nor their employees shall have any responsibility or liability of any nature for these other sites or information contained in them.

These terms shall be governed by and construed in accordance with English Law and each party to these terms submits to the exclusive jurisdiction of the English Courts.


Company Registration Number: 05723485.


Registered Address: 3rd Floor, Melbury House, 51 Wimbledon Hill Road, Wimbledon, SW19 7QW.
 
Registered by Companies House, Cardiff.



Cookie Policy


If you are uncertain about what a cookie is have a look at our simple guide to find out how we use them on our website.

What is a cookie?

Cookies are text files containing small amounts of information which are downloaded to your device when you visit a website. Cookies are then sent back to the originating website on each subsequent visit, or to another website that recognises that cookie.

Cookies do lots of different jobs, like letting you navigate between pages efficiently remembering your preferences, and generally improve your web site experience. They can also help to ensure that adverts you see online are more relevant to you and your interests.

We can split cookies into 4 main categories:

  • Category 1: strictly necessary cookies
  • Category 2: performance cookies
  • Category 3: functionality cookies
  • Category 4: targeting cookies or advertising cookies

Category 1 - Strictly necessary cookies

These cookies are essential in order to enable you to move around the website and use its features,
such as accessing secure areas of the website. Without these cookies services you have asked for,
like register for job alerts, cannot be provided.

Please be aware our site uses this type of cookie

Category 2 - Performance cookies

These cookies collect information about how visitors use a website, for instance which pages visitors go to most often, and if they get error messages from web pages. These cookies don’t collect information that identifies a visitor. All information these cookies collect is aggregated and therefore anonymous. It is only used to improve how a website works.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 3 - Functionality cookies

These cookies allow the website to remember choices you make (such as your user name and password) and provide enhanced, more personal features. These cookies can also be used to remember changes you have made to text size, fonts and other parts of web pages that you can customise. They may also be used to provide services you have asked for such as watching a video or commenting on a blog. The information these cookies collect may be anonymous and they cannot track your browsing activity on other websites.

By using our website and online services, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.

Category 4 - targeting cookies or advertising cookies

These cookies are used to deliver adverts more relevant to you and your interests. They are also used to limit the number of times you see an advertisement as well as help measure the effectiveness of the advertising campaign. They remember that you have visited a website and this information is shared with other organisations such as advertisers. Quite often targeting or advertising cookies will be linked to site functionality provided by the other organisations.

We do have links to other web sites and once you access another site through a link that we have provided it is the responsibility of that site to provide information as to how they use cookies on the respective site.

You can find more information about cookies by visiting www.allaboutcookies.org or
www.youronlinechoices.eu.

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Harnham's Brush with Fame

Harnham have partnered with The Charter School North Dulwich as corporate sponsors of their ‘Secret Charter’ event. The event sees the south London state school selling over 500 postcard-sized original pieces of art to raise funds for their Art, Drama and Music departments. Conceived by local parent Laura Stephens, the original concept was to auction art from both pupils and contributing parents.  Whilst designs from 30 of the school's best art students remain, the scope of contributors has rapidly expanded and now includes the work of local artists alongside celebrated greats including Tracey Emin, Sir Anthony Gormley, Julian Opie, and Gary Hume.  In addition to famous artists, several well-known names have contributed their own designs including James Corden, David Mitchell, Miranda Hart, Jo Brand, Jeremy Corbyn, and Hugh Grant.  The event itself, sponsored by Harnham and others, will be hosted by James Nesbitt, and will take place at Dulwich Picture Gallery on the 15th October 2018.  You can find out how to purchase a postcard and more information about the event here. 

Breaking Code: How Programmers and AI are Shaping the Internet of Tomorrow

Data. It’s what we do. But, before the data is read and analysed, before the engineers lay the foundation of infrastructure, it is the programmers who create the code – the building blocks upon which our tomorrow is built. And once a year, we celebrate the wizards behind the curtain.  In a nod to 8-bit systems, on the 256th day of the year, we celebrate Programmers’ Day. Innovators from around the world gather to share knowledge with leading experts from a variety of disciplines, such as privacy and trust, artificial intelligence, and discovery and identification. Together they will discuss the internet of tomorrow.  The Next Generation of Internet At the Next Generation Internet (NGI), users are empowered to make choices in the control and use of their data. Each field from artificial intelligent agents to distributed ledger technologies support highly secure, transparent, and resilient internet infrastructures. A variety of businesses are able to decide how best to evaluate their data through the use of social models, high accessibility, and language transparency. Seamless interaction of an individual’s environment regardless of age or physical condition will drive the next generation of the internet. But, like all things which progress, practically at the speed of light, there is an element of ‘buyer beware’, or in this case, from ‘coder to user beware’. Caveat Emptor or rather, Caveat Coder The understanding, creation, and use of algorithms has revolutionised technology in ways we couldn’t possibly have imagined a few decades ago. Digital and Quantitative Analysts aim to, with enough data, be able to predict some action or outcome. However, as algorithms learn, there can be severe consequences of unpredictable code.  We create technology to improve our quality of life and to make our tasks more efficient. Through our efforts, we’ve made great strides in medicine, transportation, the sciences, and communication. But, what happens when the algorithms on which the technology is run surpasses the human at the helm? What happens when it builds upon itself faster than we can teach it? Or predict the infinite variable outcomes? Predictive analytics can become useless, or worse dangerous.  Balance is Key Electro-mechanical systems we could test and verify before implementation are a thing of the past, and the role of Machine Learning takes front and centre. Unfortunately, without the ability to test algorithms exhaustively, we must walk a tightrope of test and hope. Faith in systems is a fine balance of Machine Learning and the idea that it is possible to update or rewrite a host of programs, essentially ‘teaching’ the machine how to correct itself. But, who is ultimately responsible? These, and other questions, may balance out in the long run, but until then, basic laws regarding intention or negligence will need to be rethought. Searching for a solution  In every evolution there are growing pains. But, there are also solutions. In the world of tech, it’s important to put the health of society first and profit second, a fine balancing act in itself. Though solutions remain elusive, there are precautions technology companies can employ. One such precaution is to make tech companies responsible for the actions of their products, whether it is lines of rogue code or keeping a close eye on avoiding the tangled mass of ‘spaghetti’ code which can endanger us or our environment. Want to weigh in on the debate and learn how you can help shape the internet of tomorrow? If you’re interested in Big Data and Analytics, we may have a role for you. Check out our current vacancies. To learn more, contact our UK team at +44 20 8408 6070 or email us at info@harnham.com.

Download our 2018 UK & EU Salary Guides

We are thrilled to announce the release of the 2018 editions of our market-leading Salary Guides for the UK, US and Europe. Having spoken to thousands of Data & Analytics professionals across the globe, we gained invaluable insights into key industry salaries and trends across a wide variety of specialisms and sectors.  Our surveys are created for analysts, by analysts, and offer a detailed, on-the-ground look at what’s concerning talent in the industry. As with the last few years, 2018 has shown us that the data industry continues to grow and shows no sign of slowing, with demand for analysts still easily outstripping supply. The guides include salary and trend analysis across five key specialisms: Data & Technology, Data Science, Digital Analytics, Marketing & Insight, and Risk Analytics. You can download the UK & EU guides here. 

Our Top Five Tips For Telling Stories With Data

As the Data & Analytics marketplace continues to grow, what is it that makes a candidate stand out? More and more, employers are on the lookout for people with both hard and soft skills; those who cannot only interpret data, but possess the ability to translate and relay that data to key stakeholders.  To convey data in a cohesive, informative, and memorable way, we need to think beyond making something aesthetically pleasing. People connect with stories, be they fictional, personal, historical or otherwise. By utilising universal storytelling techniques, we can share data in a way that people intuitively connect with.  Here are our Top Five Tips for telling stories with data: Start With The Structure  Structures are the essential foundations that sit under any good story. Without a solid structure, the story we are telling can become confusing, distracting and unfocused. When presenting data, it is essential that we work to a clear structure to ensure that we can be understood.  All stories feature three things; a beginning, a middle, and an end. A story told through data is no different: The Beginning: What is the question that has been asked? What are we trying to learn from this information? The Middle: The Data itself. What the numbers say. The End: What insights can we gain from the data, what is the data really telling us? By sticking to this structure, we can ensure that each bit of information gathered is explained with the relevant context required to convey the most information possible.  When looking at several pieces of data, it makes sense to think of these as chapters. They may tell their own smaller story, but in the wider context of an overall narrative, they need to be in the correct order to make sense and not leave anyone confused.  Speak To Your Audience When presenting data, it is crucial to remember who your audience is. Whey they’re a novice, expert, or the chairman of your company, each individual has their own vested interested in what you are showing them. As a Data and Analytics professional, your job is to serve as curator, creating a story that feels tailored to each unique person.  In order to help understand how your audience might be best served by your story, it’s helpful to ask yourself the following questions: What information are the most interesting in? What information do they need to know the most? What is their daily routine?  Is this their big meeting of the day, or one of several back-to-back? What actions will they take off the back of your insights? By asking these questions, you should be able to curate your data in a way that is meaningful for your audience.  Find Your Characters The majority of data is based upon an initial human interaction. From a video viewed, to a product purchased, it’s easy to forget that at the end of the line is a real human being. By bringing this to the forefront of your insights you create a compelling new way to connect with your audience. Consider what this data actually meant when it was first gathered; who was that person and what does this information say about them? If you are able to create ‘personas’ or ‘characters’ from this data, you can present something tangible that people can connect and, potentially, even empathise with.  Even if you use existing data to reference a personal experience, you’re adding a sense of palpability that gives your insights depth.  Painting The Right Picture  As Data Visualisers will tell you, the most elaborate visual is not always the most appropriate way to convey your insights. The key is to always consider what tells the story best. A heat map may be perfect for telling a story of geographical differences but is likely to make no sense when conveying a customer journey.  The beauty of utilising different visual techniques is that they allow you to create an emotional impact with data, fully emphasising the meaning of your insights. David McCandless showcases how data can be visualised in various dynamic ways that create the most amount of meaning possible.  Start Big, Get Smaller Data presentations have the difficult challenge of needing to be both accessible and detailed. By ensuring that you have the big picture covered with enough context, you can ensure that everyone gets the headline takeaway.  Following this, you can highlight further insights that reveal more information for those who need to do a deeper dive. Much like in a good story, whilst you may understand the overall narrative the first time round, looking closer and revisiting certain parts should reveal more insights and nuances.  If you have the skills to turn Data & Analytics insights into compelling stories then we may have a role for you. Register with us or search the hundreds of jobs available on our site. 

Recently Viewed jobs