Quantitative Analyst jobs

What We Do

We help the best talent in the Quantitative Analyst market find rewarding careers.

Quantitative Analyst jobs primarily focus on financial services, with an eye to financial market analysis, using complex modelling techniques. 

For the latest and most exciting roles in the Quantitative Analysis space, please see the jobs below.

Latest Jobs

Salary

£50000 - £60000 per annum + benefits + bonus

Location

London

Description

As a Senior Statistical Analyst, you will be building machine learning solutions to roll out and add value to the business as a whole.

Salary

US$175000 - US$205000 per year + Competitive Benefits

Location

San Jose, California

Description

Harnham is working with an industry leading brand disrupting the way customer insights are delivered across global platforms and digital products!

Salary

€60000 - €80000 per annum

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Fintech leader dans son domaine avec des super bureaux en plein cœur de Paris, la société a créé une plateforme où la data est au centre de leurs activités.

Salary

£60000 - £70000 per annum + benefits + bonus

Location

London

Description

You will be very technically hands on in projects, whilst being encouraged to lead your own research into creating tailored solutions for technical problems.

Salary

£40000 - £80000 per annum

Location

London

Description

They are improving their analytics practice to transform how they manage customers across all life cycles for both experience profitability

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

Where Tech Meets Tradition

Where Tech Meets Tradition

If you’re lamenting the decline of handmade traditional products, cast your cares aside. There’s a new Sheriff in town and its name is, Tech. Just a generation ago, children would leave the farm or the family business, go to school, and then move on to make their place in the world doing their own thing. Away from family.  Today, the landscape has changed and those who have left are coming home. But this time, they’re bringing technology with them to help make things more efficient and more productive. Is Tech-Assisted Still Handmade? In a word, yes. Artists still make things “from scratch”, except now technologies allow them to not only see their vision in real-time, but their customers, too. Have you ever wondered what the image in your head might look like on paper or in metal? What about the design of prosthetic arms and healthcare devices by 3D printers? You’re still designing, creating.  But just like any new technology, there’s still a learning curve. Even for cutting-edge craftspeople who find that sometimes, the line between craftsmanship and high-tech creativity may be a bit of a blur. Not to mention the expense for either the equipment required or being able to offer art using traditional tools at technology-assisted prices. Somewhere between the two, there is a trade-off. It’s up to the individual to determine where and what that trade-off is. Life in the Creative Economy One of Banksy’s paintings shredded itself upon purchase at an auction recently. AI is making music and writing books. Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Blockchain all have their place in the creative economy from immersive entertainment to efficient manufacturing processes. Each of these touches the way we live now. In a joint study between McKinsey and the World Economic Forum, 'Creative Disruption: The impact of emerging technologies on the creative economy', the organisations broke down the various technologies used in the creative economy and how they’re driving change. For example: AI is being used to distill user preferences when it comes to curating movies and music. The Associated Press has used AI to free up reporters’ time and the Washington Post has created a tool to help it generate up to 70 articles a month, many stories of which they wouldn’t have otherwise dedicated staff.Machine Learning has begun to create original content. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality have come together as a new medium to help move people to get up, get active, and go play whether it’s a stroll through a virtual art gallery or watching your children play at the playground.  Where else might immersive media play out? Content today could help tell humanitarian stories or offer work-place diversity training. But back to the artisan handicrafts.  Artistry with technology Whilst publishing firms may be looking to use AI to redefine the creative economy, they are not alone. Other artists utilising these technologies include:  SculptorsDigital artistsPaintersJewellery makersBourbon distillers America’s oldest distiller has gotten on the technology bandwagon and while there is no rushing good Bourbon, but you can manage the process more efficiently. They’ve even taken things a step further and have created an app for aficionados to follow along in the process. Talk about crafted and curated for individual tastes and transparency. It may seem almost self-explanatory to note how other artisans are using technology. But what about distilleries? What are they doing? They’re creating efficiency by: Adding IoT sensors for Data Analytics collection Adding RFID tags to their barrels Creating experimental ageing warehouses (AR, anyone?) to refine their craft. Don’t worry, though. These changes won’t affect the spirit itself. After all, according to Mr. Wheatley, Master Distiller, “There’s no way to cheat mother nature or father time.” Ultimately, the idea is to not only understand the history behind the process, but to make it more efficient and repeatable. A way to preserve the processes of the past while using the advances of the present with an eye to the future. If you’re interested in using Data & Analytics to drive creativity, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expect consultants to find out more. 

How Data Is Shifting Defence

How Data Is Shifting Defence

When looking at the cyber security measures in 2019 the outcome is uncertain. Threats come in the form of pariah states, extremely skilled individuals, and illiberal actors. However, what is certain is the leaps and bounds made in technology.  Before computers, defence documents were in government offices. By the Second World War this would progress onto secure sites, take Bletchley Park for example.   The real watershed would come years later in the Cold War. While there was no direct military action (aside from the proxy Korean and Vietnam War), this tension was illustrated elsewhere, with the space race and nuclear armaments to name but a few. Both sides went to extraordinary lengths to guard and seize intelligence through covert ops. As this classified information made its way onto computers and in turn brought about new risks. This theme continues to the present day; as technology improves, so do offensive and defensive capabilities.  Hard Power With the advancement in technology this has been used by militaries to take and saves lives. Only a matter of years ago aerial bombardment would have to involve putting pilots at risk, flying deep behind enemy lines. These days, a bombing run could be carried out anywhere in the globe with the ‘pilot’ not having to leave their chair. How? Through Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). This removes any casualties to their pilots, using advanced systems in Computer Vision to operate across the globe.  The ethics of this remain debated and there are many who express doubts at the use of AI, fearing their destructive potential. Others, however, see this as necessary advancement.  Indeed, in asymmetric warfare, established states’ advanced technology is near enough untouchable. Take an example from the US Marines. Still in testing, an advanced platform can allow troops on the ground to see if a room has been cleared, saving friendly lives. This is way above the capabilities of rogue terrorist forces, and looks set to play a crucial role in saving lives. It would seem highly unlikely that the Taliban, for example, could use sophisticated weaponry to bring down a jet.  However, the danger in 2019 now lies with the established illiberal states who still pose a serious threat. It is paramount that nations continue to advance, to both deter and, if needed, counter a hostile force. Soft Power While NATO states have shown dominance in physical terms over past foes, 2019 brings uncertainty when it comes to soft power, most notably cyber-security. The threats to this are very real, and are a put civilians at risk - take the Sony and NHS hackings as an example.  Moreover, the notion of alleged election meddling continues to plague politics, notably the US 2016 Election and the Brexit referendum. There have been several accusations of state-sponsored foul play incorporating the use of bots to influence people’s decision making, mostly through continual pressure on either fake news or mass-support of certain decisions. They impact society directly into our homes, considering the popularity of social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook. Alongside many other nations, the UK is taking action to counter this type of threat. Only recently a specialist cyber-security division in the army has been established, quite literally to both counter, and if needed, launch cyber-attacks.   Ultimately, society has come a long way, physically and online when it comes to defence. Sophisticated weaponry continues to develop but is raising new ethical questions, particularly in regards to the use of AI and Computer Vision. Civilian institutions remain at risk, with many having been targeted in hacks or through intervention on social media. Threats may continue to evolve, but so will defence strategies, with the two competing to stay one step ahead of the other.   If you’re interested in applying Data & Analytics to national security, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities, or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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