Three Ways You Can Better Prepare for the Future of Work

Tom Brammer our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 7/23/2020 9:37 AM
From reusable planners to navigating Zoom meetings, the world of work has changed irrevocably. Though some businesses are hoping to return to the formal in-house model, many are opting to remain remote workplaces. 

Data and web professionals have often worn a mix of hats between the two versions of work even taking breaks or making changes through contract work. The options open now, if structured well, could mean more productivity, safe environments for employees working from home rather than in house, and what may look like true work-life balance. 

But what does this mean for the world of the Data professional? Isn’t their career path already pandemic proof? Though it depends on the need of the business, this path isn’t as limited as others might be. But as everything from the world of retail to legacy institutions like banking move online more permanently, opportunities are expanded. 

TRANSFERABLE SKILLS ARE KING

As more and more professionals seek new ground, transferable skills are more in demand than ever. Specifically, those soft skills of communication, working toward solutions with limited resources, and crafting creative solutions when working through seemingly impossible problems. How professionals handle these issues, pivot on a dime toward solutions in a swiftly changing environment, and the experience they bring with them from other backgrounds all play a role.

A maturity level of professional experience far outweighs age or education. Businesses are looking for those who have not only studied toward their career, but who have experience to navigate any changes when the chips are down, and help the business stay on top of its game.

BE ABLE TO NAVIGATE CHANGE

Employees can be trained, upskilled, or reskilled when it comes to the technical aspects of their job. But what businesses need now are those professionals who can handle pressure well, understand the inner workings of organisations from a business perspective, and are customer-focused. 

JOB HOPPING IS NO LONG TABOO 

In recent years, if a resume showed more than a few jobs, it was deemed taboo. The professional was job hopping? Why? Was it the employee? The manager? Why couldn’t the employee stay in one place? Today, job hopping is no longer taboo. It’s expected. To keep things fresh from both the business and the employee perspective, changing jobs is part of the next normal.

Sabbaticals, once the darling of academia, are finding their way into other professions as well. Renamed contract work, this short-term experience, can lead to permanent roles, or just a quick change for employees to recharge from their former roles. 

This is the time to reassess, recharge, reskill, and upskill your way to success as a Data professional. The high demand and the skillset shortage is shrinking, but the demand remains and will continue to grow. So how will you structure your career path for the next normal?

In the wake of work-from-home policies, remote working, and the shifting landscape of working outside the office, technology, and particularly biotechnology careers are prime opportunities to both gain increased knowledge in your chosen field or begin your career path. 

If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics or other Data professional opportunities, take a look at our latest jobs or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  


Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out the related posts below.

It Takes Two: Data Architect Meets Data Engineer

Information. Data. The lifeblood of business. Information and data are used interchangeably, gathered, collected, and analysed to create actionable insights for informed business decisions. So, what does that mean exactly? And to that end, how do we know what information or data we need to make those decisions? Enter the Data Architect. The Role of a Data Architect Just like you might hire an architect to sketch out your dreamhouse, the Data Architect is a Data Visionary. They see the full picture and can craft the design and framework creating the blueprint for the Data Engineer, who will ultimately build the digital framework. Data Architects are the puzzle solvers who can take a jumble of puzzle pieces, in this case massive amounts of data, and put everything in order. It’s their job to figure out what’s important and what isn’t based on an organisation's business objectives. Skills for a Data Architect might include: Computer Science degree, or some variation thereof.Plenty of experience working with systems and application development.Extensive knowledge and able to deep dive into Information ManagementIf you’re just starting your Data Architect path, be prepared for years of building your experience in data design, data storage, and Data Management. The Role of a Data Engineer The Data Engineer builds the vision and brings it to life. But they don’t work in a vacuum and are integral to the Data Team working nearly in tandem with the Data Architect. These engineers are building the infrastructure – the pipelines and data lakes. Once exclusive to the software-engineering field, the data engineer’s role has evolved exponentially as data-focused software became an industry standard. Important skills for a Data Engineer might include. Strong developer skills.Understand a host of technologies such as Python, R, Hadoop, and moreCraft projects to show what you can do, not just talk about what you can do – your education isn’t much of a factor when it comes to data engineering. On the job training does it best.Social and communication skills are critical as you map initial designs, and a love of learning keeps everything humming along, even as technology libraries shift, and you have to learn something new. The Major Differences between the Data Architect and Data Engineer RolesAs intertwined as these two roles might seem, there are some crucial differences. Data Architect Crafts concept and visualises frameworkLeads the Data Science teams Data Engineer Builds and maintains the frameworkProvides supporting framework With a focus on Database Management technologies, it can seem as though Data Architect and Data Engineer are interchangeable. And at one time, Data Architects did also take on the Data Engineering role. But the knowledge each has is used differently.  Whether you’re looking to enter the field of Data Engineering, want to move up or over with your years of experience to Data Architect, or are just starting out. Harnham may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  

Best Practices in Open Data Collaboration

Over the past year, pick up any paper. Flip to any news channel. Read any news reports. And you’ll notice a common theme. Data. Specifically, all the Data we use to help us determine elections (albeit with less and less accuracy), track pandemic cases, and even measure the health of our businesses. We all know Data is important. But the question is, what Data matters most?  If we’re not collecting the right Data, our predictions and forecasting could be skewed.  Seven Ways to Help You Make the Most of Your Data Here are a few things to consider when collecting the information needed to make an informed decision. Clarify your goals.Determine who will conduct the analysis once the Data is gathered and what should be expected of the results.Set indicators to help measure your results.Use the same variables as your collaborators. When the CDC, the WHO, and a variety of hospitals and healthcare providers around the world banded together to track pandemic cases, it was important they all used the same variables in their data. Ask the right questions. Determine what it is you need to know and focus your questions to that end.Feedback Offers Insight. In our remote working world, it’s more important than ever to communicate with team members both locally and globally. Offer and accept feedback to improve your data.Secure your data. The above offer best practices and things to keep in mind. But having open Data and Data collaboration offers more than teambuilding. When diverse voices, backgrounds, and ideas gather, we can create more broadly. We find solutions we didn’t see before.  Machine Learning, AI, and Sharing Can Move the World Whether we’re sharing Data to improve our city planning infrastructures to such global operations as environmental collaborations, we work better together. Opportunities which allow organisations to share Data can lead to economic, social justice, and environmental solutions the world over.  Just like we soak up information to learn, so too, do machines and AI. These systems need data to learn and grow. These learning systems improve with new and updated information. It is a collaborative effort between human and machine. When we ask the right questions, use the same variables as our collaborators, and have clear goals of our desired objectives, these technologies can help us make better, more informed decisions.  Data collaboration has shown us what can be accomplished when we have the right information. We gain new perspectives, new ideas, and new ways of doing things to find solutions for challenges we may face. If you’re looking to take your next step in the Data & Analytics industry, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  

RELATED Jobs

Salary

800000kr - 1000000kr per annum

Location

Oslo

Description

If you are not afraid of a fast paced, start-up environment then this might be the right place for you!

Salary

£80000 - £95000 per annum + Additional Benefits

Location

London

Description

Join one of the largest data driven companies, using their data to create innovative solutions, that drive change throughout the data science community.

Salary

£30000 - £40000 per annum

Location

City of London, London

Description

Are you an insight analyst who wants to work for a leading customer loyalty consultancy?

recently viewed jobs