Life Science Analytics Lead the Way to a New Normal

Judith Kniepeiss our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 7/30/2020 9:19 AM
The Life Science Analytics industry has always beaten to its own drum. But in the days of Covid-19, there’s a different feel and it’s one in which teams are coming together and candidates are staying longer in jobs where they feel connected and impactful. 

As the drive for a vaccine and the virtually overnight demand for telemedicine and contactless care come to bear, this industry which once seemingly fell behind that of retail and banking has caught up. So, what can businesses like biotech, pharmaceutical, and other healthcare providers do to retain and keep top candidates?

EXPAND AND GROW YOUR TEAM LOCALLY AND GLOBALLY

  • Reskill and Upskill for Career Advancement - If you’re lucky enough to have retained top talent, re-consider tenure-based positions. Advance your great candidates based on performance, need, upskilling, or reskilling. You may already have someone on staff who can do the job you need done or have the potential. Let them. The world has been moving faster than it ever has in this year alone its jumped into warp speed.
  • Consider Global Collaboration – While many professionals, in every industry are working from home these days, some simply can’t due to the nature of their business. In this case, the need to be in the lab. However, as the Life Sciences & Analytics industry leads the way in their approach to flexible hours and the available Data on COVID-19, for example, global collaborations allow teams to do their work without the need for lab access.

  • In demand technical skills - Candidates skilled in Data gathering, algorithm development, and predictive modeling are in high demand as well as AutoML, NLP, and other Machine Learning solutions.

  • In demand soft skills – As the impact of the above technical skills increase and offer proven solutions, it will be important to have Data professionals who cannot only manage the technical side of things, but who can also explain solutions to the nontechnical and business executives in plain language.

Since the start of the year, we’ve seen a massive shift in the way we do business. While for some businesses, it was business as usual for the most part. For others, it completely reinvented others. Healthcare and Life Sciences are no exception. And in the healthcare industry, they’ve been stretched in ways unimaginable just last year. And have learned a new respect for numbers and accurate Data. Two things vital to moving forward.

A NEW RESPECT FOR NUMBERS AND ACCURATE DATA


This new respect for accurate numbers and Data will help teams align to predict new threats while tracking current ones. In other words, no one will be caught off guard next time as the Life Sciences and Healthcare industry prepare for a post pandemic transformation. And how will it impact the industry moving forward?

Work from home policies, global teams, telemedicine, the demand for PPE and ventilators, even the demands of the financial side of healthcare have shifted. But with the right data, innovation, and improved efficiency, it’s a sure bet the industry won’t be caught unawares again.

WELCOME TO THE NEW NORMAL


Though every profession has been hard hit during the pandemic, it’s the healthcare industry which has seen an even greater shift in the need demands to be met, shifting priorities, and patient care delivery has gone online. By moving forward with telemedicine and other automated services, the revenue cycle of the industry, too, has seen a shift. Yet to maintain business continuity, they must close the revenue gap.

And here’s where Life Science Analytics meets FinTech and InsurTech. All of these industries will need Data professionals who can speak code and translate it to the nontechnical. All will need professionals with skillsets in predictive modelling, automation, Machine Learning, AI, and more. Is it you they’re looking for? 

If you’re interested in Data & Technology, Risk or Digital Analytics, Life Science Analytics, Marketing & Insight, or Data Science jobs we invite you to check out our current vacancies or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

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How Can Organisations Tap Into The Huge Pool Of Neurodiverse Data Talent?

Ensuring that our workplaces are thriving with a diverse range of talent is, rightly, a topic that many organisations are focussing on. Yet, for the most part, this dialogue is centred around gender, ethnicity, sexuality and perhaps even physical disability. It is fairly uncommon therefore to see close attention given to exploring the challenges surrounding neurodiversity in organisations around the globe. Generally speaking, the term neurodiversity encompasses autism, attention deficit disorders, dyslexia, dyscalculia, dyspraxia and other neurological conditions. To hear a range of diverse viewpoints and perspectives is to contribute to an inclusive society and organisation. Leaving neurodiversity aside is no longer acceptable. Our research in the US highlights how 26 per cent of US adults have some form of disability, yet disabled individuals only account for 3.5 per cent of those working in Data & Analytics. As the global skills shortage worsens, it stands to reason that businesses will want to access this previously untapped talent pool. We know that in the UK, 56 per cent of organisations continue to experience skills shortages and in the US, two-thirds of employers hiring for full-time, permanent employees say they can’t find qualified talent to fill open jobs. An often-overlooked area of diversity is the impact a disability can have on an individual’s professional career. It’s no secret that all organisations would like to construct the best team – but are you doing enough to consider underrepresented talent? Creating a smooth recruitment and interview process One of the first barriers that neurodiverse candidates may encounter when seeking to enter an organisation is the recruitment and interview process. For these individuals, undergoing testing in this way puts pressure on communication skills, a tool that often allows us to better understand, connect and empathise with one another. When it comes to the recruitment process, the traditional in-person interview process — which assesses communication skills and personality fit — can be difficult to negotiate for neurodiverse candidates. In fact, this can be said to have been heightened by the pandemic too. The switch to virtual interviewing has added a new challenge to how neurodiverse candidates are able to participate in the process as miscommunication and interruptions come into the picture. For employers, tapping into the pool of data professionals with these invisible disabilities requires them to take the stress out of the interview and assessment process. It is critical to consider someone’s potential ability to do the job and the core skills that they have linking directly to the role on offer. Onboard a successful neurodiverse candidate efficiently Regardless of the size of an organisation, from global corporation to growing SME, they all share the same need to onboard new hires successfully and with limited disruption. It is this process that begins the relationship between an employee and an employer and although there will have been interactions through the recruitment process, it is the initial welcome into the organisation that will set the tone for the relationship moving forward. For neurodiverse employees this can be a daunting prospect; meeting new people while also familiarising themselves with a new environment and routine requires ongoing support and help from the employer. There are a number of ways that organisations can make this easier, from in-person or virtual meetings with smaller groups of the team to scheduled one-to-one chats with colleagues, the first few steps can be made more comfortable by promoting an inclusive culture. However, as there are such wide-ranging differences between neurodiverse conditions and individual requirements, employers need to implement policies that are tailored and highly individualised. Creating such policies and programmes can be complex and time-consuming, but it is critical to include your team in this. Ultimately it will boost your bottom line and the array of perspectives and views that are shared within the organisation. Retaining neurodiverse employees Neurodiverse candidates are capable, intelligent and have creative-thinking minds. To ensure their tenure within an organisation is lengthy and successful, we need to support these professionals and equip them with the tools and support they need to thrive. A standardised approach will not satisfy every need, and so it is important that every person in your organisation is accommodated as far as possible. The importance of this could not be clearer, as the BIMA Tech Inclusion & Diversity Report details how neurodivergent employees are more likely to be impacted by poor mental health (84 per cent against 49 per cent for neurotypical workers). This suggests that beyond attracting neurodiverse talent into the organisation, employers need to focus on the quality of the experience within the team. For example, take the time to book in regular meetings between the employee and their line manager. This will ensure that projects run smoothly, and any concerns or questions can be raised in a controlled environment. Listen to your team and their lived experiences to make informed and accurate plans to facilitate their growth within the team. After all, each employee brings a set of unique skills to a company. As more organisations realise the benefits of hiring neurodivergent candidates into their teams, employers have to act quickly to make routes into the business as accessible as possible. Ultimately, hiring neurodiverse people makes complete business sense. We know that diverse teams perform better, so now is the time to step up and tap into the huge pool of neurodiverse data talent. If you’re in the world of Data & Analytics and looking to take a step up or find the next member of your team, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.

3 Ways Machine Learning Is Benefiting Your Healthcare

With Data-led roles leading the list in the World Economic Forum’s ‘Jobs of the Future’ report, it is no surprise that Data Science continues to be the main driving force behind a number of technological advancements. From the Natural Language Processing (NLP) that powers your Google Assistant, to Computer Vision identifying scanning pictures for specific objects and the Deep Learning techniques exploring the capability of computers to become “human”, innovation is everywhere.  It’s unsurprising, then, that the world of healthcare is fascinated by the possibilities Data Science can offer,  possibilities which could not only make your and my life better, but also save several thousands of lives around the world. To just scrape the surface, here are three examples of how Machine Learning (ML) techniques are being used to benefit our healthcare.  COMPUTER VISION FOR IMAGING DIAGNOSTICS  Have you ever had a broken leg or arm and saw a x-ray scan of your fracture? Can you remember how the doctor described the kind of fracture to you and explained where exactly you can see it in the picture? The same thing that your doctor did a few years ago, can now be done by an algorithm that will identify the type of fracture, and provide insights into how you should treat it. And it’s not just fractures; Google's AI DeepMind can spot breast cancer as well as your radiologist. By feeding a Machine Learning model the mammograms of 76,000 British women, Google’s engineers taught the system to spot breast cancer in a screen scan. The result? A system as accurate as any radiologist.  We‘ve already reached the point where Machine Learning and AI can no longer just outsmart us at a board game, but can benefit our everyday lives, including in as sensitive use-cases as the healthcare industry. NLP AS YOUR PERSONAL HEALTH ASSISTANT  When we go to our GP, we go to see someone with a medical education and clinical understanding who can evaluate our health problems. We go there because we trust in the education of this person and their ability to give us the best information possible. However, thanks to the rise of the internet, we’ve turned to search engines and WebMD to self-diagnose online, often reading blogs and forums that will convince us we have cancer instead of a common cold.  Fortunately, technology has advanced to the point where it can assist with an on-the-spot (much more accurate) evaluation of your medical condition. By conversing with an AI, like the one from Babylon Health, we can gain insights into possible health problem, define the next steps we need to take and know whether or not we need to see a doctor in person.  There’s no need to wait for opening times or to sit bored in a waiting room. Easy access from your phone democratises the process and advice can be received by anyone, at any time.    DEEP LEARNING DRAWS CONCLUSIONS BETWEEN MEDICAL STUDIES Despite their extensive qualifications, even medical researchers can feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of Insights and Data that are gathered around the world in hospitals, labs, and across various studies. No wonder it’s not uncommon for important Insights and Data to get forgotten in the mix. Once again, Machine Learning can help us out. Instead of getting lost in a sea of medical data, ML algorithms can dig deep and find the information medical researchers really need. By efficiently sifting a through vast amounts of medical data, combining certain datasets and providing insights, ML sources ways for treatments to be improved, medicines to be altered, and, as a result, can save lives. And this is only the beginning. As Machine Learning continues to improve we can expect huge advances in the following years, from robotic surgery to automated hospitals and beyond. If you’re an expert in Machine Learning, we may have a job for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities of get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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