The Top Trends to Watch in Big Data & Analytics

Rosie O'Callaghan our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 2/26/2020 2:40 PM
Having a Data Strategy Plan for your business is no longer a nice-to-have. It is a must have, and in most circles is mission-critical to success. Where terms used to be fused (e.g. AdTech, MarTech, FinTech, etc.), infrastructures are now merging to create better and more powerful opportunities to better serve business and the day-to-day tasks of our personal lives.

Data continues to change the landscape of our world and, as we look forward to the future, this shows no sign of slowing. Here are some of the biggest trends shaping Data Analytics right now:

A Smart World: IoT, Conversational Analytics, and NLP


It’s estimated that by 2020, there will be around 30 billion IoT connected devices. Think beyond smart houses and smart cars to video doorbells, smart refrigerators and toasters, setting your thermostat by remote and beyond. As this cadence of progress marches forward, IoT will no longer be a hardware challenge, but a data challenge. 

And according to a Gartner report on Data Analytics trends, it’s estimated 50 percent of analytical queries will be generated via search, voice, or NLP by 2020. Will this make Data Analytics more approachable for the everyman? 

Augmented Analytics


Is Augmented Analytics poised to be the next big thing? With a market valued at US$8.4 billion just a couple of years ago, it’s estimated to grow to US$22.4 billion by 2025. Using Machine Learning and NLP to automate Data preparation for sharing, Augmented Analytics could redefine the way we approach our Data.

Cloud Continues to Come of Age


Cloud IT infrastructure may already be mainstream, but with spending expected to reach US$82.9 billion by 2022, and with over half all software, services, and technology expected to connect to the Cloud in the same timeframe, expect the conversation around the Cloud to keep growing.

Data Science Roles Evolve into Specialties 


Frequently, the term Data Scientist is used to refer to anything to do with Data. From gathering and collecting to developing metrics and offering Data insights and forecasting. But as Data teams became less siloed and IT infrastructures became more specialised, the role has evolved into more specific functions, often with a Machine Learning or NLP focus. However, this evolution didn’t stop at these specifics. 

It’s even made room for those with no programming background. From Marketing Analysts who focus on the customer journey to Business Analysts and Communications Directors who can utilize their soft skills to explain Data professionals’ findings. Whether you’ve got a programming background or an interest in how Data fuels business, the world of Data has opened up. 

Have we reached the end of the beginning? As we find ourselves on the cusp of the next generation of Data & Analytics in both our personal and professional lives, we spoke to Daniel Levine, Trends Expert and Keynote Speaker to gather his thoughts. Here’s what he had to say:

"The biggest overall trend I'm seeing for Data in the coming decade is all about ownership, transparency, privacy, and governance.
Data famously wants to be free, but the opposite has happened as companies across the industrial spectrum have scooped it up and siloed it away.
The 2020s will create unprecedented amounts of Data from biometric recognition, deep learning, digital streaming, smart appliances and more. And ownership will be shared with -- if not controlled by -- individuals rather than governments and corporations.
Blockchain will play a pivotal role in this, offering individuals the ability to safely take control of their own Data. 
Many governments, led by the liberal democracies of Europe, will enact legislation that aligns with new realities and new technologies that empower both institutions and individuals to understand and control their own Data.
The frightening alternative that, when it comes to Big Data, we have reached the end of the beginning whereby a totalitarian dystopian future is nigh."

If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.   

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Large parts of the world may have moved to working remotely for the foreseeable future, but that doesn’t mean that their projects have ground to a halt. And, with Data & Analytics at the forefront of many businesses ongoing strategies, their Data teams are continuing to grow regardless.  As a result, we’ve seen a huge increase in the number of video interviews taking place as companies look to continue hiring and meet their growth and business goals.  For many, however, video interviewing will be an entirely new experience, one that throws a number of complications into the mix during an already unusual situation. With that in mind, we’ve put together our ten top tips for acing a video interview: UNDERSTAND THE TYPE OF VIDEO INTERVIEW “Live” interviews are ones where you’ll see another person on the end of the connection. These are typically conducted using Skype, Zoom or Google Hangout. For some interviews you’ll be recording your answers, expect these to be done using sites like Sparkhire. Ask your recruiter or contact with the business in advance so you know what type of video interview to expect. TEST YOUR INTERNET CONNECTION AND WEBCAM Test your connection for Skype, Zoom Google Hangout, or whichever interview platform you are specifically using. Do a test run to see how fast/slow your connection is to see if you will have any problems with the video that you may need to resolve beforehand. SOUND CHECK  Equally as important is how you sound. Having to repeat your answer because the interviewer couldn’t hear you will not only annoy the interviewer, it may disrupt your flow and throw you off guard. If possible, try not to use headphones, as they may make you look less professional (video interview or otherwise!), but audio quality is more important than appearance here, so check the audio in advance to be sure. CONNECT WITH YOUR INTERVIEWER IN ADVANCE  If you know who you’re interviewing with connect with them on LinkedIn beforehand or get their phone information. This is so you have a backup in case the video platform isn’t working and will save any last-minute panicking if the platform isn’t working. DRESS THE PART Just because the interview is over video doesn’t mean you don’t get dressed up for it. Dress how you would if you were having the interview face to face – first impressions count! Plus if you’re dressed smartly from head to toe it’ll help you feel best set up for success. LOOK BEHIND YOU  Interviewers can easily be distracted by what is happening behind you. If you don’t have a home office, use a room where you’ll have a wall or bookcase behind you which will look professional. REMOVE DISTRACTIONS Noise, music, children and pets can all be distractions to you and your interviewer. Be prepared to continue through the interview if your pet makes noise or your child barges in. Ideally if you can find a quiet space away from these distractions you won’t be interrupted. MAKE EYE CONTACT Interviews over video won’t replicate a live meeting. You have to proactively make sure you smile, make eye contact and speak clearly. Don’t fidget or make a lot of movement – if the connection is slow, you’ll appear fuzzy and out of focus. DON'T PREPARE AT THE LAST MINUTE You wouldn’t leave preparing to the last minute if you were meeting face to face so a video interview shouldn’t be different. Prepare your answers, questions to ask the interviewer and use post it notes if you need helpful reminders for video-specific tips (Look at the webcam! Smile! Speak clearly!). KEEP A GLASS OF WATER NEXT TO YOU It’s an ideal prop if you do need to take a couple of seconds to collect your thoughts before answering a question. Don’t substitute for a hot beverage (tea or coffee for example) as if you do spill you don’t want to be distracted by a burn or stain.  If you are looking for your next role, we may be able to help. Take a look at our latest jobs, where you will find a number of remote working opportunities.  Or, if you are looking to make a remote hire, get in touch with one of our expert consultants and we can help you manage the process. 

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