Using A ‘Data First’ Approach In Your Data Science Job Search

Nick Mandella our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 10/22/2020 9:13 AM
The litany of past jobs, education, and business goals has and is quickly becoming a thing of the past. With millions out of work, the rise of remote working, and the continued high demand for those in the Data industry field, CVs today must be much more dynamic. And, for the innovative Data Scientist, there are plenty of ways to stand out from the crowd.

If you’re interested in working in Data First environments, why not use the idea to inform your job search? Consider this. When you begin your search, you’re using many of the same tactics you’d use in any role – assess, analyse, gather, improve, and control.

Want to Make a Career Change? Assess the Situation.


While more Data professionals are staying in their roles longer than in previous years, there do come times when it’s time to make a change. Maybe you want to get a fresh start somewhere for more creative expression. Maybe you want to be a strong leader who wears a variety of hats, but you’re dug in to your current role. So, what do you do? If you’re on the fence, you assess the situation.

Here are a few steps you might follow:

  • Review your CV – with which business processes and technical systems do you have experience?
  • Determine which roles interest you and why – do you need more education, a new skill, or does the company you’re interested in offer on the job training, upskilling, or reskilling?
  • Research the role you’re interested in – your desired outcome - and breakdown any challenges into actionable efforts you can make to get the job.
  • Gather as much Data as possible to not only help with any adjustments to your CV, but to include in your cover letter. Remember, what was once on paper and emailed or delivered can now be done by video. After all, your next goal is likely a Zoom interview.

Maybe you’ve gone a bit further and created a mind map of your goals, experiences, and processes. If so, you’ve got the beginnings of your job search model.

Putting Your Job Search into Action to Improve Your Chances


You’ve gotten much of the preparatory legwork done. Now, it’s time to get things moving and test the market. 

Perhaps you’ve got a spreadsheet or are keeping a journal of companies you’d like to work or roles you’d like to take on. You’ve researched their website pages, gotten the hiring managers information, and have crafted your cover letter and CV to fit the job you’re most interested in. Have you sent out your information or made connections in your field? Are you getting a good response or only a trickle?

This is the improvement phase. This is where you tweak things. How?

  • Have a friend or recruiter review your CV – are their typos? Do you meet the right qualifications? Are you over or under-qualified? Is there anything they think you could add which might help?
  • Did you follow the application instructions correctly? Did they request a video resume and you sent them paper or vice versa?
  • Have you addressed any feedback you’ve received from hiring managers, recruiters, friends, or colleagues?

When you figure out where and what to improve, you can move forward more proactively. Many businesses want a professional who can address issues specific to a project or difficult situation. Determine what needs to change and fix it with an eye toward improving the process in the future.

Taking Control of Your Job Search


Looking for a job can often feel like the employers have all the power, but that’s not necessarily the case. When the reigns are tightened and your focus is sharp, you have more control than you think.

After all, you’ve done much of the legwork many won’t think to do. You’ve assessed your situation, your processes, and your systems – networking, job board, or contract work to try new things and gain new experience. You’ve determined your gaps and closed them.

What you’ve learned along the way has helped you not only in your job search, but has given you insight into your ideal role. If you’re looking for a career change, and have followed a Data first approach, your newly embedded processes and goals will streamline into whatever you choose to do. The best part? It drives your own ROI. The time invested in yourself and in conducting your job search with such focus can only bring about good things.

If you’re looking for your next role in Data & Analytics, Harnham can help you search and prepare. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more.  

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With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

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