Lights, Camera, Data

Henry Rodrigues our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 7/25/2019 10:23 AM
Whilst Data continues to play a huge role in all aspects of life; developing businesses, schools, health care etc., one industry has already seen a massive impact from the Big Data revolution. The film industry, and its television counterpart, were among the first see to the potential of how Data can transform the way they work. 

Beyond profit, access to new types of Data is allowing companies to consider what audiences will be most interested in at specific times, utilising current viewing habits, what topics are the most popular on social media, and even the news so they can create something that tailors to everyone’s different interests.

The Streaming Revolution


Netflix’s popularity is down to more than the variety of movies and series it has to offer. Its pioneering use of recommendation systems, originating when it was purely a DVD rental service, means that it always knows what its subscribers want to watch, when they want to watch it, and on what device. Their ability to tailor bespoke recommendations, down to which poster people see, has created an entirely different approach to how viewers chose and engagement with entertainment. 

Netflix’s Data collection means that it knows its audiences very well, something they can utilise as part of their marketing. By contrast, even a behemoth like Disney can struggle to compete. Following the success of 2015’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Disney Chairman, Bob Iger admitted ‘we don’t have any idea who went to see Star Wars in the cinemas’. Whist this may have not been too much of a problem at the time, given the film’s $2 Billion box office, the diminishing returns of the films that have followed suggests that better insight as to why the film was a success may have been beneficial. It’s no wonder, therefore, that Disney are launching their own streaming service later this year. 

Beyond Box Office


In the majority of businesses these days, Data is used to decipher consumer buying habits, web traffic and social media interactions, as well as to monitor supply chains, costs and sales. This is no different for the movie industry, particularly when examining what makes a move work. By using Data Science, producers can determine which actors, directors, release dates and even running times are likely to make a movie profitable. For example, history may dictate that the summer is likely to be the most profitable time of year. Whilst this may be true for June, where average profit is $100m, ten times that of January, November and December are the second and third most profitable months.  

Beyond assessing profitability, however, Hollywood is using technology to try and re-establish a relationship between creators and audiences. Newly emerging tools are empowering studios to convert massive quantities of movie-goer reactions into meaningful actionable insights. With Big Data analytics, movie executives have gained an insight into audience’s perspectives and this is dramatically altering the way in which movies are made, marketed and distributed. Companies like IBM are looking at new ways of tracking sentiment analysis that will have a massive impact on the creative process. However, whether or not the industry’s leading writers and directors will want to work within these parameters is yet to be seen. 

#DataDrivenAds


Data’s impact on the movie industry goes beyond the insights it offers on audience perceptions. When it comes to marketing a movie, the Data & Analytics space offers a number of opportunities. Studios are beginning to realise that, in order to drive the small-screen generation to the big screen, they need to come to their territory. To promote ‘The Dark Tower’ in Singapore, Sony ran a series of targeted mobile adverts that allowed users to choose a character to engage with. A follow up campaign then targeted users who had engaged with relevant messaging and details of showtimes at their nearest cinemas, using the mobility of their devices to their advantage. Furthermore, for the release of ‘Ready Player One’, Facebook offered an augmented reality experience for those who engaged with the film’s poster in public. 

However, sometimes, the most effective marketing technique remains word-of-mouth. Netflix’s ‘Bird Box’ received little critical praise and minimal attention initially upon release. However, once users started posting memes about the movie onto their social media feeds, viewing figures picked up exponentially. This allowed Netflix to reassess their marketing efforts and respond to public sentiment, creating a strategy that fed off the zeitgeist and was significantly more effective. 

Data has transformed the movie industry. If you’d like to work with Data & Analytics to transform another, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out the related posts below.

How Web Analytics Can Help Grow Your Business

Six months ago, many businesses had big plans for the new year, and the new decade. Little did we know the year had big plans of its own. So, how can businesses put their best foot forward now? Web Analytics. Understanding your Web Analytics helps you understand your customers. And, as everything stays online for the foreseeable future, you’ll be better placed to understand what demographics and desires drove the customer to your site, how you and your business can improve, and you can ultimately grow your business. So, how can Web Analytics help you? Understand Where Your Customers Come From Enhance Their Experience. Consider how your visitors come to your site – phone, tablet, laptop – and how you can optimise your site to best suit these devices. When you understand their demographic – age, gender, interest, location – you can use this information to enhance their experience through your customer-driven business decisions.  Know What Your Best Content Is and How it Draws Visitors to Your Site Visitors, views, page actions, and more all tell your business how your site is performing and what people like see and read. For example, if you have a ‘best day’ or ‘most read’ tag, find out what it was people identified with, and do more of it. Keep things fresh. Curate Your Content with SEO in Mind When you know your visitors, you can use search engine optimisation (SEO) to gain better visibility, rank higher on search engines, create content focused on what customers want to know based on their demographics and interests. Track and Analyse Your Metrics Align Analytics with Your Business Strategy  By aligning your data, analytics, and business strategies, you’ll have a clear view of your mission, your business objectives and goals, and data-driven solutions to inform your business strategies. Trust Your Team to Make Informed Decisions from the Frontlines Standardise Processes and Tools Explain Clearly to Eliminate Roadblocks to Change  As businesses return to a new normal and begin to rebuild, leaders will want to reassess business models. Though ways of doing business are new for everyone, many consumers say they’ll continue to use digital channels into the future. Make AI and Web Analytics Resources a Priority Look For and Hire Talent from Unexpected Places This has been a time to reassess change in not only business practices, but careers. Distance and remote learning have provided opportunities for those interested in pursuing new paths to upskill themselves for future jobs. Or if you see a professional in your business with potential, this is also an ideal time to reskill those workers ready for a change. Offer training, classes, and more to help drive interest. Build Your Data Strategy More Aggressively Identify risk through an audit of your existing models at the operational, risk, and financial areas and keep a close eye using model-validation. Having this information can help your business to better inform your decisions and reassess your business practices from just a few years ago. Don’t get caught up in one form or another of Data. Be sure to include both external and internal Data in your audit. Having this information can help you decide which Data should be cleansed, what information should inform improvements, and how standardisation can help ensure your Web Analytics metrics keep your business running for the future. From stakeholders to business leaders to employees on the frontlines, everyone is learning at a rapid rate. Ensuring everyone is on the same page with an eye to processes and standardisation can help to position your business for scalability.  Much has changed from January to June, but if you’re ready for the new normal, we may have a role for you. If you’re interested in Big Data & Analytics or other Data professional opportunities, take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  

The Evolution Of CRM Marketing – A Q&A With Catherine Allan

We recently spoke to Catherine Allan, an Associate Director of CRM at Babylon health, a Digital healthcare service with a mission to put accessible and affordable health service into the hands of everyone.  After starting her career in journalism, Allan moved into Marketing, a seemingly natural transition given her copywriting experience. Given the transformation in technology and the use of Data within Marketing, she has seen the significant impact that it has had within the space.  Reflecting on what attracted her into CRM Marketing in the first place, she explains, “It’s that ability to really get to know the audience, what they look like. You have a very defined group of people that you can look at exactly how they are responding – you can get to know their likes, dislikes and respond to them in ways that you can engage them more. You can keep them working with or using your product or organisation”.  Initially working for Ten Lifestyle Group, her clients varied from travel businesses to large financial brands. Like many at the time, they had their traditional methods but, as would soon become a trend within the industry, they started to change things up. Allan expands, “We started experimenting with CRM with the members of our concierge to see if we could. How much better would those people respond to tailored communication over those who received a newsletter of generic stuff?”. Enter the use of Data to tailor CRM offerings. Their first application was to their travel clients, “If we knew someone had a skiing holiday versus a holiday in September one year, we would follow up the following year. Isn’t it time to pick a holiday?”. It seems natural now, but it signified that shift from the mass-communication to segmented customer profiles.  As Marketing teams became more Data-driven, however, customers had to get used to that change of communication. Allan remembers the shift well, “When I first started in CRM, it wasn’t personalised at all but I started to see that people got more used to you knowing their Data and using it. It became less freaky to show that you knew something about them. At the beginning, we were having to be careful about how much we evidenced that we knew, you couldn’t really say I know you’ve had a Ski Holiday. But over the course of the years people have started to expect that, almost like it would be weird if marketeers didn’t know that. The culture towards that use of Data and personalisation has changed”.   However, she explains, there is a limit, “With what people are expecting from your CRM, there is a scaling to how you present stuff. You don’t want to be creepy, you don’t want to overstep it by knowing too much”.  Now, moving into the health-tech space at Babylon, her work revolves around the products that they have on the market. Everything from applications that allow you to log your mood and sync your wearable tech, through to a health check function where you’re given a digital twin of your body. The use of Data within these products is, of course, on another level. The products produce Data-driven recommendations that are very specific to each users. She explains, “obviously in the Marketing team we don’t have access to people’s health records or any health information which they input into the app. So it’s about finding the right cadence to actually engage people with the product, as well as personalising using the Data we can see, such as demographics. Men and women have different health concerns and they differ for younger and older age groups.” Moving into the health space has opened up a different way of engaging with customers. Allan and her team were able to use their Data and produce newsletters that actually engaged their audience on a wider basis. She expands, “We found great success in sending regular newsletters just about health in general, people love to know how they compare to other people and they also want to know to be empowered to manage their own health”.  Naturally, a company like Babylon feel the pressures of a global pandemic in what their customers expect from them to say and do. This is exactly what Allan’s team are now focused on. “When the pandemic came to the UK, as a healthcare company the first thought for the Marketing team was how can we support our members? What can we offer which is unique to Babylon which will add value. The answer we came to was offering information, guides and videos verified by doctors to counteract all those false stories out there about COVID-19”.  Despite the technology to innovate, with things like interactive emails and unique content, there was still a need to strip things back. As Allan explains, “people are anxious, they are worried, they just want the right information, you’ve already got their attention”.  Her team was responsible for launching this new product to members and developing lifestyle communications, whilst also keeping the members engaged and updated. Naturally, the communication during the pandemic shifted, “We upped our newsletter frequency from twice a month to twice a week for the first three weeks of lockdown, then down to once a week, a cadence which we are still maintaining with no drop off in interest” What were the results of these changes? “Our open rates went up, our click through rates went up and our unsubscribes reduced, although they were very low to start with) We reduced sends to once a week when we felt that there was less to say, which I think was better than continuing to send more and becoming boring. Our results over the last 6 weeks have been off the charts averaging a 34% open rate across the whole base of subscribers vs the 24% we were averaging before.”  It’s clear that regardless of industry, from lifestyle to healthcare, the world of CRM has progressed. The information that we gather on customers is evolving, as is the way that we can speak to those customers too. One thing is clear however, from Allan’s experience, especially in the current circumstances, nothing takes away from a clear message.  If you’re looking for your next CRM role or to build out your team, Harnham may be able to help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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