The Power Of Programmatic: How It Keeps On Converting

Francesca Harris our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 5/23/2019 8:45 AM
Applying to anything from digital out-of-home to mobile, social media to TV, Programmatic tech continues to develop at a furious pace. And as it gets more sophisticated so, too, does its power to fuel growth across multiple industries. 

So it goes without saying that Programmatic is set to remain a valuable part of the Ad Tech toolkit. As it evolves, brands can measure and enhance their creative campaigns with ever-greater accuracy to improve conversion rates and engagement.

Here are some of the latest ways automated ads have been helping brands increase their influence over customers.

SHORTENING THE RETAIL SALES FUNNEL 


The former might of traditional brand and advertising agency models is fading. Instead, we’re seeing the old sales funnel being redefined into a more direct buying journey.

Omnichannel shopping is now the norm, and screens with their accompanying ads wield plenty of power in influencing how we shop. 

Thanks to growing numbers of mobile purchases coupled with Programmatic technology, brands use Data to improve the customer experience, reduce acquisition costs and push more products into online shopping baskets. 

And as more retailers prioritise selling stuff online, they gain more control over customer data. Which in turn feeds their automated ads and speeds up the buying journey further.

BOOSTING BRANDED CONTENT REACH 


No worldwide media corporation would last long without using technology to make the best use of its resources. So it makes sense that the BBC uses Programmatic ads to create greater access to its branded content.

Using data, the BBC can see what particular audience segments are into, from trending topics to the devices they’re choosing to devour news and entertainment. From there, the broadcaster twins its own data with wider industry stats to form insights that help to shape its content strategy.

Automated media buying also reduces the labour that traditionally accompanied ad campaigns. The key advantage being that it frees up staff to concentrate on more creative tasks, according to Luke Fox, the BBC’s Head of Programmatic for the Asia Pacific.

As a direct result of the automated ads, the BBC’s media placement has become more focused and effective, with branded content “getting to the right people at the right time.” An advertiser’s dream come true, essentially. 

It is minimal effort, too. Using Programmatic tech gives organisations better access to consumers all over the world, across a wide array of media such as podcasts. 

CUSTOMISED MESSAGING


We all know that personalisation is a tried-and-tested marketing strategy. So it’s no surprise that programmatic ads adapt to whoever they’re targeting. Ads adapt to multiple audience variants, from age, gender, income and location right down to the device we’re using.

Through constant feedback, marketers can adjust their campaigns in real time, changing their message according to where customers are, what they’re doing and how they’re responding to the ad.

In theory, as more brands move their media-buying in-house, the Programmatic process becomes easier to control and adapt. Zendesk’s director of digital Aurélien Dubot certainly thinks so. After the company moved its advertising in-house, Dubot says the decision has enabled them to make instant tweaks: “We don’t wait a week or three days to adjust things, we adjust it straight away.”

Whether brands choose in-house or an agency for their media buying, one thing’s for certain: programmatic is a complex system that continues to bear fruit, provided brands set clear goals for what they’re trying to achieve. Ultimately, the results will only be as good as the data, along with the marketing team’s ability to analyse it.

The Programmatic industry is growing. If you’re interested in Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with our expert consultants.  

Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out the related posts below.

MARKETING INSIGHT AND THE CUSTOMER FEEDBACK LOOP

Marketing Insight And The Customer Feedback Loop

As the holidays approach, Marketers are focusing more than ever on User Experience (UX). They’re not only looking at what kind of product customers might want or need but how will it look and feel to them? If a product doesn’t have what you need or doesn’t function as appealingly as others, what good is it? Key elements such as aesthetics, usability, and ‘feel’ are integral to the user experience. Because these elements come from such seemingly disparate departments as Marketing and Developers, it’s important to figure out how to come together for the ultimate UX. After all, if today’s buyers buy experiences over tangible products, then ensuring the experience is important to bridging the gap between customers, marketers, and developers. This, when done right, helps to build and retain customer relationships; the foundations upon which business is built. Design User Experience with M&D By bringing marketers and developers (M&D) together, you create the opportunity for innovation. But there are some key elements to consider when designing UX and it follows four stages. Do your research. Identify needs, spending patterns, buying behaviours, and historical data to determine what it is customers desire. Find out what they want or need and give it to them. This is the role of the marketer backed by development.Gather the data. Using multiple touch points across multiple sources and channels, find what works. What product offers usability and determine how design choices can help to create a seamless experience for your customer.Design your idea and create a prototype. Brainstorm your design. What are its product features, user interface, and aesthetics? Does it look user friendly? Would you pick it up off the shelf? Why? What is it about the product that makes you want to have it? What problems can it solve for you?Time to Test it. Is your product user friendly? What are its useful functions? How does it look? Feel? Incorporate feedback to improve its performance, function, or aesthetic. What does your test market say? Would they buy it? Why or why not? Bridging the Gap with collaboration We can forget sometimes, lost in our jargon and our buzzwords, that it’s the customer who we hope will benefit from our product or service. Yet, traditionally, marketers gathered customer preferences and drove sales, while developers designed products based on those preferences. However, the two departments were often siloed and creativity, usability, function, and aesthetics either got overshadowed or underrepresented to varying degrees. Enter customer feedback an integral point of reference for all parties involved. Customers are at the heart of user experience and it’s their feedback which can inform the user experience. What better marketing insights than those straight from the customer? Working with Marketers and Developers, customers provide a crucial component to helping marketers understand market dynamics. On the flip side, customer feedback can help mitigate risk or issues down the road by providing solutions and helping to resolve problems. the impact on Product Development By conducting user experience testing, marketers and developers can determine if a product is a good fit for customer needs. At the same time, they may identify issues to be resolved which can be learned of in real-time for a better user experience once the product is launched. Each has their role to play in designing the user experience and contributing to market insights for more informed business decisions.  These include: Marketers are part of the design experience from conception to inception. They are responsible for gathering the data to identify problem areas, working with Developers to create a product or service to solve a problem, and gathering data from the customer. Do they like this product? Why? What pain points does it serve? And how can it be made better or improved? Developers are the designers. They must take the information the marketers have collected and try to make the product into something functional and aesthetically-pleasing. Though they operate more at the back-end, they too much collaborate with customers to capture issues and solve problems. Developers test the products, making improvements as needed. Each stage a constant in UX design.Customers offer invaluable data and metrics through their feedback and reviews. The insights they contain as the end user about using the product, revealing its challenges, and suggesting room for improvement, make this three-part collaboration the final link in the chain between marketers, developers, and customers when it comes to designing the ultimate user experience. If you’re interested in the relationship between insights and UX, we may have a role for you. Check out our current opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to learn more. 

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Web Analytics have long been used to help companies understand their customers’ online behaviour, extracting and interrogating an abundance of information; from time spent on pages to bounce rates and conversion rates. Having provided a lot of insight as to what customer are doing online, these techniques have been less useful for understanding why they do it. This is where psychology comes in. As the why of Web Analytics becomes more and more important, with companies always looking ways to edge out the competition, there are more links to psychological principles than you might expect.  Of course, traditional Web Analytics and metrics remain very important. However, what psychology can do is help us speculate as to why customers may be behaving the way they do and, by doing so, allow businesses to make more informed changes to their websites, or conduct more conscious testing.  Without directly asking we will never know the real reason behind customer’s actions, but we can use a number of established psychological constructs to make well informed assumptions. We can then work this backwards and use these constructs to make changes to our sites that will fall in line with these assumptions in order to convert more customers.  Familiarity People tend to favour that which they are familiar with, whether it be items of clothing that match their preferred style or holidays like ones they have been on before. A customer visiting a page to find a series of unfamiliar products is more likely to leave without making a purchase. This is why personalisation is important; it gets rid of unnecessary information and leaves the user with products they are more likely to want.  By working backwards, businesses can personalise their sites to each individual customer. If you’ve ever bought an item of clothing from an online shop only to be shown a number of similar items the next time you log on, you’ll know what I’m talking about. The thinking is that, as these items are more familiar to you, you’ll be more likely to either purchase them, or remain on the site to purchase something else.  Social Proof  Research into social proof has shown psychologists that the more people who reinforce a certain concept, the more likely it is that other individuals will perceive it as correct. This heuristic is used widely by companies like Just Eat and Deliveroo who allow customers to leave comments about their restaurants and give them a star rating. It is much more likely that conversion rate will be higher on restaurants with better reviews as the rating allows the customer to make a quick judgments on its quality.  Scarcity This is a cognitive bias where humans put more value on things that are scarce over those that are in abundance. If one site is showing a product with no indication to the quantity left but another company is showing a similar product where there are only three left, the customer is more likely to convert on the second site. Where an item is nearly unavailable, this suggests a number of things; it is more valuable and it is desired by more people (social proof) etc. Companies like Amazon and Asos use this technique by showing visitors when an item is low in stock or even showing how few are left, giving them an edge on conversion over their competitors.   Web Analysts and CRO professionals should take note of user psychology and start to implement it in their day to day practice. In fact, some might be already without even knowing the fundamentals of the psychology behind these techniques. Applying the above techniques and testing these ideas could produce a boost in conversion that simple changes to user experience, like changing the position of the checkout basket, aren’t providing.  A number of businesses are now looking for Analysts who can explain why customers are behaving in a certain way and tell a story with the Data, rather than just explaining what was found. Finding someone with this deeper understanding of user psychology has therefore an integral part to many hiring processes. By looking into this area, candidates are likely to increase their chances of securing the role they want.  Whether you’re looking to expand your Web Analytics function or want to take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

RELATED Jobs

Salary

£30000 - £35000 per annum

Location

City of London, London

Description

This charity who are the forefront of analytics in the charity sector are seeking a digital analyst!

Salary

£40000 - £45000 per annum

Location

Manchester, Greater Manchester

Description

A brand new role leading a team for a large online retail company, working on all digital analytics projects.

Salary

£30000 - £45000 per annum

Location

London

Description

Optimise content marketing performance for a vast array of clients in this Senior Web Analyst role

Salary

US$125000 - US$126000 per annum

Location

New York

Description

The perfect role for a technical Web Analytics Developer who wants to be part of a growing, boutique Web Analytics agency.

recently viewed jobs