Data & Berlin: Looking to 2020

Peter Schroeter our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 10/23/2019 1:26 PM
Following our recent Data & Analytics meet-up at our new Berlin offices, I’ve been reflecting on some recurring challenges faced in our industry. A number of our speakers all touched on the same topics and, having looked around, it seems they aren’t the only ones who are concerned about staying ahead of the curve. 

In a market of constantly shifting priorities and 2020 just around the corner, I’ve highlighted some of the main themes that keep coming up, and are worth bearing in mind as you begin to look at your Data & hiring strategies for next year:

Retention


Retention remains a highly important issue for businesses, as covered here, and we heard a number of insightful talks on the topic at our event. In particular, both the optimisation of workloads and the essence of customer centricity and autonomous teams were highlighted as key issues. Both providing interesting approaches to ensuring your workforce remains engaged and happy and  we will be releasing further information on these talks soon so, if you missed the event, watch this space or sign up to our mailing list to keep up to date.

Cyber Security


Following a number of high-profile data leaks (including the sensitive data belonging to hundreds of German politicians, celebrities and public figures less than one year ago), security really is at the forefront of everyone’s minds. Integrating Security into the DevOps cycle is becoming more and more popular as businesses increase their security and reliability alongside their speed of deployment. If you're interested in knowing more, the Puppet “State of DevOps Report 2019,” is well worth a read.

Analysing Data


How we analyse and use Data as a business is becoming more and more important as enterprises look to stay at the forefront of their fields and remain relevant in this Data-centric world. With so many different technologies and techniques used to quickly process & analyse data, Data Science, Machine Learning & Business Intelligence professionals are becoming more and more sought after.

Recruiting & onboarding


The recruitment and retention of staff is frequently the most important thing on the agenda of many businesses, not just in Data. Making sure your recruitment process in a candidate-led market is as streamlined and relevant as possible is something that should be a priority for any expanding business. From my experience, many companies write up their process, then stick with it for years and, whilst this can create consistency, in such a fast-paced and evolving industry is this necessarily the right thing to do? Here's one of my colleagues on attracting the right candidates and I also intend to put together my own article on creating an effective Recruitment Process for your business next week. 

If you’re looking for support with your Data Science hiring process, get in touch with one of our expert consultants and we'll able to advise you on the best way forward. 

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