How To Get The Most Out Of Your Recruiter

Talitha Boitel-Gill our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 1/16/2019 11:54 AM
As a recruiter I’ve had some great relationships with candidates over the years. I view these relationships like partnerships and an ideal partnership is one where communication is natural and transparent. 

Some partnerships have worked better than others, and I’ve seen some common denominators in the ones that work (and the ones that don’t). Let me preface this with one thing: 

We want to help you get the job.  

However, we are working with specific guidelines and role requirements. Sometimes that means we have to give feedback to you and let you know that you’re not qualified or you’re not exactly what our client is looking for. 

When I give this kind of feedback it is because we are trying to help you streamline your efforts towards processes that you will nail, and ultimately get you a job that you’re happy with.

If you’re looking for your next job and would like to collaborate with a recruiter, my biggest tip would be that in order to get the most out of you recruiter you should:

BE HONEST


About your salary expectations

Salary can be a taboo subject. As your recruiter we need to know what salary you would be happy with because our clients have a budget that they need to stick to. By being open about what your current earnings are, and what you’d like to earn in your next role, we can make sure you don’t get an offer which is ultimately too low for you. Be 100% honest about your ambitions and current levels, and we will advocate for you all the way.

About your current role and responsibilities

When we chat, I’ll often ask a lot of questions and try to get a lot of detail. Speaking to a recruiter can feel like an interview, but we’re not trying to trip you up. We’re trying to find out what you’re doing right now – all of it. Not because your next job is going to be the same, but because we need to find out how transferrable what you’re doing right now is to our client and if you’re able to take on a new set of skills. 

We also use this conversation to assess your communication skills, and if you’re unable to explain what your current role involves then we can work together on your interviewing technique.

About other processes that you’re in

Sometimes when I ask candidates about their other processes they feel uncomfortable. If you’re working with another recruiter or if you’ve already applied directly to one of my clients, that’s okay but I need to know so I can:

  • Find out if you have impending offers that my clients should know about. Understand which roles you’ve been targeting and thus which types of businesses you naturally felt inclined to pursue (maybe I have similar roles at similar companies).
  • Help you with time management and ensure you can prepare accordingly. 
  • Avoid accidentally meddling in an existing process that you’re already in through a speculative conversation.


About reasons you’re looking for opportunities

Tell your recruiter why you’re on the market, so that we can make sure you’re not on the market again for the same reason in six months. That means you need to be honest about why you’re leaving! How else can I make sure that we’re alleviating your current frustrations? For example:

  • Hate your manager? That’s too bad! What management style would you prefer?
  • Do you want to learn a new skill? Let me find out which of my clients can help you.
  • Looking for a more senior role? Which responsibilities would you like to have 
  • Passionate about getting into driverless cars? I won’t tell you about my retail roles!
  • Just curious? Absolutely fine – but that means we need to discuss the root of your curiosity in more detail so that we don’t talk about every job from here to the moon.

The list goes on but the more detail I have, the more efficient I can be in selecting the right role based on your motivations.

About your interview experience

I’m not looking for one-liners when I ask about your most recent interview. I want to know how you're feeling, what you learnt, and more.

Did the interview leave something to be desired? OK, how can I help you get your hands on it?

If you already know you don’t want this job, that’s absolutely fine. But it would be great to know why so we can avoid similar situations. 

Maybe you feel like you underwhelmed the interviewer and that you should have answered something differently? I can be your messenger after the fact, so you have another chance to get your message across.

Ultimately, recruiters are here to support you through a stressful process. We want to make your search easier by being your agent. To make sure we are able to represent you to the best of our ability, we need a great candidate/recruiter relationship, a relationship that is honest and transparent. 

As I mentioned at earlier, ultimately, we just want you to find the right role for you. If you’re looking for a role and would like to partner with a recruiter, take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch

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