HOW DEEP LEARNING IS TREATING HEALTH-BASED ISSUES

Lucia Pizzola our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 8/30/2018 8:00 AM
Hospitals are a complicated system of many moving parts both human and machine. In recent years, the role of humans driving the process, entering information, gathering individual records, or arranging medical and billing follow ups, has shifted.

Paper records have become electronic health records and AI is helping streamline bulky processes. AI bots and programs free up time when it comes to arranging follow up medication or helping to make diagnoses and, in some cases, can assist physicians or surgeons making remote calls and decisions.

As Machine Learning and AI enter healthcare, the application of Deep Learning, using data rather than task-based algorithms, is coming into its own. At this year’s KDD event, both Healthcare and Deep Learning were hot topics, with a day of programming dedicated to each.

The Three Ingredients Driving AI Advances:


  • Supply of digital data which can now be created.
  • Development of algorithms to make artificial neural networks.
  • Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) chip architecture pioneered by NVIDIA.

GPUs are used by anyone working in Deep Learning and can be used in any number of ways, such as videos, graphics, and audio recordings to name a few. This type of usage has huge impact on Healthcare’s image, clinical data interpretation, and management. 

For example, Radiology requires consultants to look at medical imagery to determine whether or not there are abnormalities. With the inclusion of Deep Learning, this process could be done in minutes or seconds rather than hours. This is especially important as a diagnosis made is based on findings in the radiological images.

However, Radiology, is not the only instance where health management can utilise Deep Learning and AI. From helping to identify ideal treatments for patients, to helping administrators utilise their resources more effectively and efficiently, there is huge potential for implementation. 

Predictive Analytics in Deep Learning


Healthcare can be hard to predict. But, with the application of Machine Learning, there are some things we can focus on, starting by asking ourselves the following:

  • Is it scalable? This may differ based on different hospital systems and how much data wrangling is involved. But, the more straightforward the answer, the better.
  • Is it accurate?  Using Deep Learning data for electronic health records can greatly improve accuracy and avoid the distraction of false alarms.

Predictive modelling can help Healthcare professionals answer the questions above more accurately, including determining which patient will have a particular outcome versus which patient will not. Though this model does not diagnose the patient, it does use the information from data gathered to identify the conditions in which the patient was being treated and predict outcomes. Like a human might pick up nonverbal signals, AI picks up signals based on the data it receives to and helps inform physician’s decisions.

The Patient Journey 


Whether it’s the customer journey or the patient journey, there is a path that needs to be followed. As Deep Learning helps fuel the use of AI in Healthcare, our patient journey becomes less stressful and more streamlined. 

Below are a few ways Deep Learning is helping to facilitate a more efficient health management system:

  • At Home: You go to a doctor because you don’t know what’s wrong. But, how do you know which doctor you should make an appointment with? AI can help. From your home PC, a few clicks and few questions can direct you to the correct provider for your needs.
  • In the Waiting Room: To avoid long wait times, you can check in via an app, have an AI bot ask a number of questions for you to answer to help better prepare the physician for your visit with the goal of a quicker diagnosis.
  • With the Doctor: Referrals are great. But, having to explain your health issue or record, can be daunting. In addition, the doctor to whom you’re referred may have to call your traditional physician and discuss, or he or she may have papers to read cutting into their time with you. Instead, AI standardises how the doctor reads the notes and can lay it out the way the doctor prefers, increasing your time with them and streamlining their process.
  • Patient Follow Up: An AI bot based on Deep Learning algorithms can become part of a provider’s team, checking in, asking a few questions, and sending a friendly reminder email, text, or phone call to remind patients to take continue their course of treatment. 

The introduction of Deep Learning into Data & Analytics has made an impact across many industries, but especially Healthcare. not the least of which has been healthcare. From speech recognition to Natural Language Processing, the effects have been informative and transformational.

If you’re interested in Deep Learning, predictive analytics, or AI we may have a role for you. We specialise in Junior and Senior roles.  To learn more, check out our vacancies. You can also call us at +44 20 8408 6070 or email us at info@harnham.com.

Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

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Hunted’s Ben & Danni On Cybersecurity

Hunted’s Ben & Danni On Cybersecurity

Ben Owen and Danni Brooke are the Co-Directors for the EMEA Practice at Fortalice Solutions, a leading global cyber security and intelligence operations company.  They travel globally to assist clients with their cyber security requirements, bespoke training needs, intelligence and investigations both online and physical and counter fraud training/consultation. They deliver and manage a portfolio of pro-active intelligence solutions to keep people, nations and businesses safe from threats and head up the EMEA operations.  Ben and Danni also feature on the hit Channel 4 show, Hunted and Celebrity Hunted which has been airing for over four years with another series set to be filmed this summer. I caught up with them recently to discuss the latest Fraud, tools and challenges for the Cybersecurity industry. Cybersecurity is an ever-changing landscape. What trends do you anticipate for the next 12 months and beyond? It is always difficult to pin down what the next real trend is going to be in the Cybersecurity space as adversaries are becoming ever more sophisticated.  What was once a very difficult process for skilled individuals is becoming more readily available to novices with advances in software, particularly those shared on the Dark Web. What is an inevitable threat trend in the next 12-months and beyond is the exponential rise in the Internet of Things (IoT).  With a world where everything is hooked up to the web, it is apparent that tech companies selling these devices are under immense pressure to get products to market. The need for speed could mean that some security principles and best practices may be overlooked.   As the UK encountered during the Mirai Botnet attack of 2016, a network of electronic devices acting in concert can cripple the internet or, worst case, become a weapon that could cause actual physical damage as well as cyber damage, power stations, hospital networks to name but a few.   How have Data & Analytics impacted the detection, and prevention, of cyber-crime? A company will have to protect themselves against an enormous amount of cyber threats every second.  A cyber-criminal will only need one successful attempt. Data & Analytics are proving successful in the fight against cyber-crime and their proactive and holistic approach is at keeping people and businesses safe.  Of course, it is Data that is being stolen, but very often Data can come to the rescue.  It helps in a number of ways, e.g. identifying anomalies in employee and contractor computer usage and patterns, detecting irregularities in networks, identifies irregularities in device behaviour (a huge advantage with the rise of the IoT). What one must remember, however, is the people behind the Data.  You can’t simply collect Data and assume you will be able to detect and respond with the right actions.  You need the people with the right analytical skills to sift through the Data, find the right signals and then react to the threat with an appropriate and timely response.   What tools and technologies do you think will become increasingly important in the fraud and cyber-crime landscape? Here at Fortalice we are investing a lot of time into coverage of the Dark Web.  We live in a rapidly changing digital landscape. Criminals, fraudsters, and others are now operating with more sophistication and anonymity. Where do they go to exchange fraudulent details and ideas about current victims? What medium do they use to discuss organisational targets or new ways of defrauding companies? The answer is the Dark Web.  Traditionally, companies fight fraud from the inside out. We want to change this landscape by accessing the entirety of the Dark Web, its pages, shady storefronts, and treasure troves of Data, and drawing on monitoring toolsets to give our clients a 360-degree resource for identifying adversarial communications and movements. It’s all about Internet coverage.  Wherever it is difficult to find – that’s where your threat will be.   A final point to this question is one of sharing tools and techniques.  A collaborative approach is always a good way of making sure the wider audience benefits.  We always work with our clients and offer other services and support outside of our remit to make sure they’re fully protected from a cyber and physical space.   What are the biggest security threats for businesses? Security is fundamentally broken because the design of many security solutions does not design for the human psyche.  Security solutions are bolted on, clunky, and hard to use but because security teams prioritise defending against easier cyber threats, they often don’t focus on the hardware side. The biggest risk to companies and individuals is always defined by the Data that is most important to you or to the business.  For individuals, this might be privacy or identity. For businesses, this could be customer Data, intellectual property, and the company’s money in the bank. The reality is that business executives can’t outspend the (cybersecurity) issue and they must be prepared. Cybersecurity no longer exists in a vacuum and it must be elevated to the conversations held in the boardroom and with senior leadership as well as entire divisions, departments, and organisations. For someone trying to get into security analytics, what skills do you think are key to being successful in the industry? The detail is in the name of the role.  A huge ability to interpret large amounts of technical Data is key to the role, as well as being able to assimilate what it means and how to action it.  Risk management is also key to this role.  Very often you will identify potential risks and you will have to triage those priorities on your own as co-workers won’t have the technical expertise to assist.  You will need to be able to communicate successfully to all levels of a workforce and last but by no means least – a good sense of humour!  When you think you have gotten to understand a new threat or vulnerability a new one will replace it within seconds.  Time to put the kettle on, smile, and get back to work with your analytical prowess.   Within fraud, it's well known that criminals are sharing their approaches, is this mirrored in cyber-security and if so, how is the industry combating this? Criminal collaboration is huge on the web.  First of all, there is no talent shortage for fraud rings or cybercriminals. There are no requirements for fancy university degrees or certifications and the crime ring pays for performance.  They don’t care what you look like, how you dress, or if you clock in during normal work hours. They care about getting the job done - hacking into and stealing information from others. Together they are sadly stronger and more effective.  On Dark Web forums, you will see fraudsters sharing and selling their ‘IP’ knowing that others will also contribute. That way they are all winners.  In the private world ideas equal money. That is of course not a bad thing for business, but it is bad for collaboration. Businesses generally don’t like to share ideas with one another because it has taken them lots of time and expense to get to their product or solution. As cliché as this comment sounds - we have to change this landscape for the greater good.  There are lots of smart government initiatives for national defences in cyber security and fighting high-end cyber-crime but seldom does this have a positive impact locally with smaller businesses.  There is a huge amount of information out there for individuals and advice, but we need to bridge the gap still between criminal collaboration and that of the good guys. If you could change one thing in the industry, what would it be? The mind set of security professionals that humans are the weakest link. We’re not! Humans are at risk because technology is by design, open.  I’d also change the mind set of those not in the Cyber Security industry.  All too often the severity of what is being reported is not taken seriously, nor are budgets set aside for cyber security issues.  That said, it is improving but there is a long way to go.  Ben and Danni spoke to Senior Consultant, Rosalind Madge. Get in touch with Rosalind or take a look at our latest job opportunities here.

Harnham Named one of the Sunday Times' Top 100 Companies to Work For

Harnham Named one of the Sunday Times' Top 100 Companies to Work For

I am thrilled to announce that we've been named one of The Sunday Times' Top 100 Small Companies to Work For 2019.   This is the first year we've been eligible for the award and, fantastically, we've managed to place 26th.   Coming off the back of our three-star accreditation from Best Companies for 'Extraordinary Levels' of workplace engagement, and being named APSCo's Recruitment Company of the Year (£10m-£50m) this is something else for the whole business to be proud of.  Crucially, for both myself and the leadership team, is the fact that this accolade is based entirely on employee feedback. Our success has always been built on the success of our employees and we have always tried to nurture an environment where they can flourish. To be recognised for our efforts. and to know that our staff are happy here, means a tremendous amount to us. And, as ever, we're looking to grow our team. If you're determined, ambitious and driven, get in touch about our latest opportunities. 

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