HOW DEEP LEARNING IS TREATING HEALTH-BASED ISSUES

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Author: Mark Proud
Posting date: 8/30/2018 8:00 AM
Hospitals are a complicated system of many moving parts both human and machine. In recent years, the role of humans driving the process, entering information, gathering individual records, or arranging medical and billing follow ups, has shifted.

Paper records have become electronic health records and AI is helping streamline bulky processes. AI bots and programs free up time when it comes to arranging follow up medication or helping to make diagnoses and, in some cases, can assist physicians or surgeons making remote calls and decisions.

As Machine Learning and AI enter healthcare, the application of Deep Learning, using data rather than task-based algorithms, is coming into its own. At this year’s KDD event, both Healthcare and Deep Learning were hot topics, with a day of programming dedicated to each.

The Three Ingredients Driving AI Advances:


  • Supply of digital data which can now be created.
  • Development of algorithms to make artificial neural networks.
  • Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) chip architecture pioneered by NVIDIA.

GPUs are used by anyone working in Deep Learning and can be used in any number of ways, such as videos, graphics, and audio recordings to name a few. This type of usage has huge impact on Healthcare’s image, clinical data interpretation, and management. 

For example, Radiology requires consultants to look at medical imagery to determine whether or not there are abnormalities. With the inclusion of Deep Learning, this process could be done in minutes or seconds rather than hours. This is especially important as a diagnosis made is based on findings in the radiological images.

However, Radiology, is not the only instance where health management can utilise Deep Learning and AI. From helping to identify ideal treatments for patients, to helping administrators utilise their resources more effectively and efficiently, there is huge potential for implementation. 

Predictive Analytics in Deep Learning


Healthcare can be hard to predict. But, with the application of Machine Learning, there are some things we can focus on, starting by asking ourselves the following:

  • Is it scalable? This may differ based on different hospital systems and how much data wrangling is involved. But, the more straightforward the answer, the better.
  • Is it accurate?  Using Deep Learning data for electronic health records can greatly improve accuracy and avoid the distraction of false alarms.

Predictive modelling can help Healthcare professionals answer the questions above more accurately, including determining which patient will have a particular outcome versus which patient will not. Though this model does not diagnose the patient, it does use the information from data gathered to identify the conditions in which the patient was being treated and predict outcomes. Like a human might pick up nonverbal signals, AI picks up signals based on the data it receives to and helps inform physician’s decisions.

The Patient Journey 


Whether it’s the customer journey or the patient journey, there is a path that needs to be followed. As Deep Learning helps fuel the use of AI in Healthcare, our patient journey becomes less stressful and more streamlined. 

Below are a few ways Deep Learning is helping to facilitate a more efficient health management system:

  • At Home: You go to a doctor because you don’t know what’s wrong. But, how do you know which doctor you should make an appointment with? AI can help. From your home PC, a few clicks and few questions can direct you to the correct provider for your needs.
  • In the Waiting Room: To avoid long wait times, you can check in via an app, have an AI bot ask a number of questions for you to answer to help better prepare the physician for your visit with the goal of a quicker diagnosis.
  • With the Doctor: Referrals are great. But, having to explain your health issue or record, can be daunting. In addition, the doctor to whom you’re referred may have to call your traditional physician and discuss, or he or she may have papers to read cutting into their time with you. Instead, AI standardises how the doctor reads the notes and can lay it out the way the doctor prefers, increasing your time with them and streamlining their process.
  • Patient Follow Up: An AI bot based on Deep Learning algorithms can become part of a provider’s team, checking in, asking a few questions, and sending a friendly reminder email, text, or phone call to remind patients to take continue their course of treatment. 

The introduction of Deep Learning into Data & Analytics has made an impact across many industries, but especially Healthcare. not the least of which has been healthcare. From speech recognition to Natural Language Processing, the effects have been informative and transformational.

If you’re interested in Deep Learning, predictive analytics, or AI we may have a role for you. We specialise in Junior and Senior roles.  To learn more, check out our vacancies. You can also call us at +44 20 8408 6070 or email us at info@harnham.com.

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