2018 Top Five Data & Analytics News Stories

Joshua Carter our consultant managing the role
Posting date: 12/20/2018 9:13 AM
2018 has seen Big Data & Analytics come to the forefront on the public’s attention like never before. A series of scandals, new laws, and technological developments have opened up fresh conversations about who has access to our data, and what privacy really means in the 21st Century. 

In a year with a lot of news, it’s no surprise that some of the biggest stories have had a major impact on the Data & Analytics marketplace. As 2018 comes to a close, we’ve pulled together five of the biggest stories that have not only had a huge impact this year, but will continue to have repercussions in 2019 and beyond. 

#5. Apple Become the World’s First $1 Trillion Company


At the beginning of August, Apple became the first company to be valued at $1 Trillion. A result of the launch of their premium iPhone X, they beat rivals Microsoft, Amazon and Alphabet to the milestone. Initial fears that the death of Steve Jobs in 2011 would stall the company’s growth proved to be unfounded, highlighting that product and brand still play the largest role in consumer loyalty. 

This achievement has raised the bar for what a tech company can achieve, and expect to see numerous others attempting to reach this level over the next decade. For an idea of what they’ll have to achieve, however, take a look at the New York Times’ visualisation of what a $1 Trillion value really means. 

#4. Google Walk Out Over Women’s Rights


Following the #MeToo movement coming to precedence in 2017, businesses are now being properly scrutinised for their treatment of women. From the gender pay gap, to cases of sexual harassment, people are demanding transparency and accountability. Within Data & Analytics, the protests at Google were the leading example. 

Allegations surrounding the company’s handling of claims of sexual misconduct led to staff around the world walking out. Looking for several key changes, in particular the end of forced arbitration, employees highlighted Google’s key mission statement of ‘Don’t Be Evil’. 

Diversity and equality will continue to take centre stage in the years to come, with smaller businesses likely to face similar amounts of scrutiny. We’ll be releasing our report on the state of Diversity in Data & Analytics in early 2019, so come back soon to get your copy.  

#3. The Crypto Crash


Having peaked at $19,783.06 in December ’17, 2018 saw Bitcoin, and numerous other cryptocurrencies, finally crash. Whilst this had been predicted for a while, it looks as though it may take some time for any of the currencies to gather any new momentum and regain stability. 

Tough new restrictions in China, one of the biggest countries for crypto, as well as ICO Ad bans on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram will limit the number of new and returning buyers. Furthermore, initial moves into the mainstream, such as Barclay’s crypto trading project, appear to have stalled. In contrast to the past few years, the future of crypto is no longer looking so bright. 

#2. GDPR Comes Into Play


Anyone who works with any form of data couldn’t miss the introduction of GDPR, as it became enforced in April this year. A complete rewrite of the rules for data protection, we’re only beginning to see its true impact, as the first UK enforcement finally arrives. 

Many industries are already feeling a more specific impact, however. In particular, those working in Ad Tech have found the new regulations to be frustratingly limiting to their capabilities. Despite these issues, this is far from the end of GDPR, as both the US and India look to introduce similar regulations in the not-too-distant future. 

#1. THE CAMBRIDGE ANALYTICA SCANDAL


The biggest Data & Analytics story of the year is, undoubtedly, the Cambridge Analytica scandal. A watershed moment in the public’s perception of how their data is used, concern grew from privacy issues to potential large-scale election rigging. The resulting chaos has seen an immense amount of pressure on Facebook and, in particular, Mark Zuckerberg, who has been called in front of numerous governments.

Whilst the outcomes don’t appear to have ultimately been too dire for Facebook as a business, the consequences of the scandal will continue to be felt for a long time to come.  Data breaches now regularly make headline news and the way we scrutinise how companies use our data is forever changed. 

If you’re looking to make a big impact in 2019 and beyond, we may have a role for you. Check out our latest roles or get in touch with one of our specialist consultants. 

Related blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out the related posts below.

The Harnham 2019 Data & Analytics Salary Guide Is Here

We are thrilled to announce the launch of our 2019 UK, US and European Salary Guides. With over 3,000 respondents globally, this year’s guides are our largest and most insightful yet.  Looking at your responses, it is overwhelmingly clear that the Data & Analytics industry is continuing to thrive. This has led to an incredibly active market with 77% of respondents in the UK and Europe, and 72% in the US, willing to leave their role for the right opportunity.  Salary expectations remain high, although we’re seeing that candidates often expect 2-10% more than they actually achieve when moving between roles.  Globally, we’ve also seen a change in the reasons people give for leaving a position, with a lack of career progression overtaking an uncompetitive salary as the main reason for seeking a change.   There also remains plenty of room for industry improvement when looking at gender parity; the UK market is only 25% female and this falls to 23% in the US and 21% across the rest of Europe.  In addition to our findings, the guides also include insights into a variety of markets and recommendations for both those hiring, and those seeking a new role.  You can download your copies of the UK, US and European guides here.

Where Tech Meets Tradition

Where Tech Meets Tradition

If you’re lamenting the decline of handmade traditional products, cast your cares aside. There’s a new Sheriff in town and its name is, Tech. Just a generation ago, children would leave the farm or the family business, go to school, and then move on to make their place in the world doing their own thing. Away from family.  Today, the landscape has changed and those who have left are coming home. But this time, they’re bringing technology with them to help make things more efficient and more productive. Is Tech-Assisted Still Handmade? In a word, yes. Artists still make things “from scratch”, except now technologies allow them to not only see their vision in real-time, but their customers, too. Have you ever wondered what the image in your head might look like on paper or in metal? What about the design of prosthetic arms and healthcare devices by 3D printers? You’re still designing, creating.  But just like any new technology, there’s still a learning curve. Even for cutting-edge craftspeople who find that sometimes, the line between craftsmanship and high-tech creativity may be a bit of a blur. Not to mention the expense for either the equipment required or being able to offer art using traditional tools at technology-assisted prices. Somewhere between the two, there is a trade-off. It’s up to the individual to determine where and what that trade-off is. Life in the Creative Economy One of Banksy’s paintings shredded itself upon purchase at an auction recently. AI is making music and writing books. Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Blockchain all have their place in the creative economy from immersive entertainment to efficient manufacturing processes. Each of these touches the way we live now. In a joint study between McKinsey and the World Economic Forum, 'Creative Disruption: The impact of emerging technologies on the creative economy', the organisations broke down the various technologies used in the creative economy and how they’re driving change. For example: AI is being used to distill user preferences when it comes to curating movies and music. The Associated Press has used AI to free up reporters’ time and the Washington Post has created a tool to help it generate up to 70 articles a month, many stories of which they wouldn’t have otherwise dedicated staff.Machine Learning has begun to create original content. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality have come together as a new medium to help move people to get up, get active, and go play whether it’s a stroll through a virtual art gallery or watching your children play at the playground.  Where else might immersive media play out? Content today could help tell humanitarian stories or offer work-place diversity training. But back to the artisan handicrafts.  Artistry with technology Whilst publishing firms may be looking to use AI to redefine the creative economy, they are not alone. Other artists utilising these technologies include:  SculptorsDigital artistsPaintersJewellery makersBourbon distillers America’s oldest distiller has gotten on the technology bandwagon and while there is no rushing good Bourbon, but you can manage the process more efficiently. They’ve even taken things a step further and have created an app for aficionados to follow along in the process. Talk about crafted and curated for individual tastes and transparency. It may seem almost self-explanatory to note how other artisans are using technology. But what about distilleries? What are they doing? They’re creating efficiency by: Adding IoT sensors for Data Analytics collection Adding RFID tags to their barrels Creating experimental ageing warehouses (AR, anyone?) to refine their craft. Don’t worry, though. These changes won’t affect the spirit itself. After all, according to Mr. Wheatley, Master Distiller, “There’s no way to cheat mother nature or father time.” Ultimately, the idea is to not only understand the history behind the process, but to make it more efficient and repeatable. A way to preserve the processes of the past while using the advances of the present with an eye to the future. If you’re interested in using Data & Analytics to drive creativity, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expect consultants to find out more. 

RELATED Jobs

Salary

US$90000 - US$100000 per year

Location

Los Angeles, California

Description

Oversee the programmatic team for a major automotive client in this independent ad agency.

Salary

€70000 - €90000 per annum

Location

Heidelberg, Baden-Württemberg

Description

Ein deutscher Retailer sucht für seinen Standort in Heidelberg nach einem Spezialisten in Performance Marketing.

Salary

€70000 - €80000 per annum + BONUS

Location

München (81249), Bayern

Description

Bist du bereit für den nächsten Schritt in deiner Karriere als Programmatic Advertising Specialist?

Salary

£35000 - £40000 per annum + bonus + benefits

Location

London

Description

DMP and audience specialist? Great publisher-side role to lead DMP activity

recently viewed jobs