Becoming a Recruitment Consultant

Our Recruitment Consultant Graduate Scheme is a two year programme aimed at taking you from Rookie to Expert in two years



WHY 
HARNHAM

Recruitment isn't an easy job and we are very aware that there are lots of opportunities for an aspiring consultant to grasp. So why us?

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  • We've invested in a leading training structure and have an onsite trainer whose experience spans 10 years, having trained over 10,000 recruiters so far. The initial three months of your career are dedicated to training - learning about recruitment, our markets and how we do it after which you will receive frequent training as you develop your career.

  • We're still privately owned and the Partners run the business day to day - this means that we only hire people that truly want to carve themselves a career in recruitment, developing into the future leaders of our business. They spend time and money investing in your career and want you to be the best you can be, and make as much money as you possibly can.

  • We work in a thriving market and are the Global leaders in what we do - Data & Analytics might not mean anything to you now but it's a part of your everyday life. We generate over 2.5 quintillion bytes every day from consumer transactions, communication devices, online behaviour and streaming services - someone needs to analyse that and we place the people that do. When you start working on the roles, you quickly learn just how relevant they are to your everyday life.

  • Companies talk about 'hot desks' all the time, but when experienced consultants join us they are shocked to see its actually true, we're lucky enough to have worked with our clients for a number of years, often having made hundreds of placements with them.

  • We're competitive but friendly - it's a hard mix to get right, but it works here. Everyone works to their own targets and gets their own commission - but teams work together just as much. You'll have managers and mentors from day one, and they're committed to making you a superstar too, you'll always have someone to ask advice from.

  • We spend time together outside of work too - A lot of our consultants have relocated to London to start their careers, so naturally colleagues also become a friend pool from the get go. It's a regular occurrence that consultants spend a few hours after work hitting the gym (or the pub). Some of them even live together!

  • We are a high-performance company - because we hire people that are looking for a career and that match our business culture, we tend to find consultant performance is high and consistent. Rather than having a few 'top billers' and the rest in the middle - our experienced consultants are always close to beating one another, with 90% of them hitting over £200k+ per year from year 2 onwards.

THE 
ROLE

Recruitment is, at its core, a sales role, but it's a sales role with a high degree of sophistication, complexity and satisfaction. Recruitment is split into two parts; Clients and Candidates

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Clients

Client's pay recruitment agencies lots of money to find them the talent they can’t source themselves. These relationships typically arise through cold calling, and so you'll need to be comfortable cold calling businesses to sell your service and expertise (as well as Harnhams). Once you're through that, you negotiate an agreement with the business to work on the roles before going out to market to find candidates. During the process you work closely with the client to ensure you've got a solid brief on the role, are clearly communicating your updates and, when the candidate is made an offer, working hard to negotiate an agreement that will get the candidate off the market.

Candidates

Sourcing candidates is one of the main parts of the role. Once you've landed the client, you need to find them the best candidate as soon as you can. This is often done through headhunting, advertising, networking and referrals. You will carefully work with your candidates to understand what they are looking for, and seeing if their skills and requirements match the client's needs, before working with them to get through the interview process and receiving an offer.

Incentives & Benefits on offer…

  • Company holidays 
    Each year our top billers across the Globe make their way to a high-flying location for an all-expenses paid trip of a life time. Last year it was pool parties in the top venues of Vegas and this year our winners will be sipping cocktails in the Caribbean.

  • Is fine dining your thing? 
    We love to get ourselves suited and booted once in a while and experience the finer things in life. We have outstanding lunch club trips each quarter to some of the top Michelin Starred restaurants in London and it’s all paid for.

  • Uncapped commission
    The sky is the limit with our incredible commission structure.

  • Office bar
    If you like to start your weekend in style with a nice cold beverage then we have something in common. We like to crack open our fully stocked fridges filled with soft drinks, beers and wine for those special occasions and Friday afternoons.

  • Dress down Fridays
    No explanation needed, it’s all in the name.

  • Other great perks include free breakfast, free fruit, discounted gym membership, cycle to work scheme, interest free travel loan, charity days, sports teams

THE IDEAL 
CANDIDATE

The best people in recruitment have real drive, ambition, resilience and motivation so, to us, these are the most important requirements. Throughout your interview process you will be tested in all of these areas and more, so please don’t apply unless you are sure you can compete with the best.

At the end of our interview process, you will also have a chance to experience what being a recruitment consultant involves on a day-to-day basis with some time on the sales floor and even calling some of our candidates, so be ready to be put out your comfort zone and to learn a lot.

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Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

The Power Of Programmatic: How It Keeps On Converting

Applying to anything from digital out-of-home to mobile, social media to TV, Programmatic tech continues to develop at a furious pace. And as it gets more sophisticated so, too, does its power to fuel growth across multiple industries.  So it goes without saying that Programmatic is set to remain a valuable part of the Ad Tech toolkit. As it evolves, brands can measure and enhance their creative campaigns with ever-greater accuracy to improve conversion rates and engagement. Here are some of the latest ways automated ads have been helping brands increase their influence over customers. SHORTENING THE RETAIL SALES FUNNEL  The former might of traditional brand and advertising agency models is fading. Instead, we’re seeing the old sales funnel being redefined into a more direct buying journey. Omnichannel shopping is now the norm, and screens with their accompanying ads wield plenty of power in influencing how we shop.  Thanks to growing numbers of mobile purchases coupled with Programmatic technology, brands use Data to improve the customer experience, reduce acquisition costs and push more products into online shopping baskets.  And as more retailers prioritise selling stuff online, they gain more control over customer data. Which in turn feeds their automated ads and speeds up the buying journey further. BOOSTING BRANDED CONTENT REACH  No worldwide media corporation would last long without using technology to make the best use of its resources. So it makes sense that the BBC uses Programmatic ads to create greater access to its branded content. Using data, the BBC can see what particular audience segments are into, from trending topics to the devices they’re choosing to devour news and entertainment. From there, the broadcaster twins its own data with wider industry stats to form insights that help to shape its content strategy. Automated media buying also reduces the labour that traditionally accompanied ad campaigns. The key advantage being that it frees up staff to concentrate on more creative tasks, according to Luke Fox, the BBC’s Head of Programmatic for the Asia Pacific. As a direct result of the automated ads, the BBC’s media placement has become more focused and effective, with branded content “getting to the right people at the right time.” An advertiser’s dream come true, essentially.  It is minimal effort, too. Using Programmatic tech gives organisations better access to consumers all over the world, across a wide array of media such as podcasts.  CUSTOMISED MESSAGING We all know that personalisation is a tried-and-tested marketing strategy. So it’s no surprise that programmatic ads adapt to whoever they’re targeting. Ads adapt to multiple audience variants, from age, gender, income and location right down to the device we’re using. Through constant feedback, marketers can adjust their campaigns in real time, changing their message according to where customers are, what they’re doing and how they’re responding to the ad. In theory, as more brands move their media-buying in-house, the Programmatic process becomes easier to control and adapt. Zendesk’s director of digital Aurélien Dubot certainly thinks so. After the company moved its advertising in-house, Dubot says the decision has enabled them to make instant tweaks: “We don’t wait a week or three days to adjust things, we adjust it straight away.” Whether brands choose in-house or an agency for their media buying, one thing’s for certain: programmatic is a complex system that continues to bear fruit, provided brands set clear goals for what they’re trying to achieve. Ultimately, the results will only be as good as the data, along with the marketing team’s ability to analyse it. The Programmatic industry is growing. If you’re interested in Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with our expert consultants.  

Harnham's 2019 Salary Guide: The Launch Event

The 2019 Harnham Salary Guides are nearly here. Last night saw a hundred of Data & Analytics' top professionals gather to get their hands on an advanced copy and hear from some of the best in the industry.  With talks from Tom Spencer (Aviva), Mark Ainsworth (Schroders), and Anna Decoudu (118 118 Money), attendees were treated to insights into some of the world's best Data teams.  A huge thank you to everyone who came along, we hope you found the evening as enlightening as we did.  Our UK, US and European Salary Guides will all launch online mid-June. To be one of the first to get your hands on a copy, sign up to our mailing list here. 

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Computer Vision

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Computer Vision

“Don’t judge a book by its cover”. We use this adage to remind ourselves to go deeper and to look beyond the superficial exterior. Except, sometimes, we can’t, or won’t. Sometimes, our perceptions are pre-programmed. Think family, peer pressure, and social influences. But what about computers? What do they see? In a digital landscape that demands privacy but needs information, what are the advantages and disadvantages of Computer Vision? The Good: Digital Superpowers  Let’s be clear, Computer Vision is not the same as image recognition, though they are often used interchangeably. Computer Vision is more than looking at pictures, it is closer to a superpower. It can see in the dark, through walls, and over long distances and, in a matter of moments, rifle through massive volumes of information and report back its findings. So, what does this mean? First and foremost, it means Computer Vision can support us in our daily activities and business. It may not seem like it at first glance, but much of what the computer sees is to our advantage. Let’s take a deeper look into the ways we use Computer Vision today. Big Data: From backup cameras on cars to traffic patterns, weather reports to shopping behaviours and everything in between. Everything we do, professional to personal, is being watched, recorded, and used for warning, learning, saving, spending, and social. Geo-Location: Want to know how to get from Point A to Point B? This is where Geo-location comes in. In order to navigate, the satellite must first pinpoint where we are and along the way, it can point out restaurants, shops, and services to ease us on our way.Medical Imaging: X-rays, ultrasounds, catheterisations, MRIs, CAT Scans, even LASIK are already in use. Add telemedicine and the possibilities are endless. The application of these functions will allow faster and more accurate diagnoses and help save lives.Sensors: Motion sensors that only turns a light on when a heat signature is nearby are already saving your home or business money on your electric bill. Now, during a shop visit when you are eyeing an intriguing product, your phone may buzz with a coupon for that very item. Computer Vision sensors are now tracking shopper movements to help optimize your shopping experience.Thermal Imaging: Heat signatures already help humans detect heat or gas and avoid dangerous areas, but soon this function will be integrated into every smart phone. Thermal imaging is no longer used just to catch dangerous environments, it’s used in sport. From determining drug use to statistics and strategy, this is yet another example . The Bad: Privacy Will Forever Change  Google is 20 years old this year. Facebook is 15. Between these two media tech giants, technological advances have ratcheted steadily toward the Catch-22 of both helping our daily lives, whilst exposing our data to our employers, governments, and advertisers. Computer Vision will allow them to see you and what you’re doing in photos and may make decisions based on something you did in your school or university days. We’re already pre-wired to make snap judgements and judge books by their cover, but what will these advancements do to our daily lives? Privacy will change forever.  We document our lives daily with little regard to the privacy settings on our favourite social media apps. GDPR has been a good start, but it’s deigned to protect businesses and create trust from consumers, rather than truly offer privacy. So far, the impact on our privacy has been limited as it still takes such a long time to sift through the amount of data available. However, the time is coming soon, where we’ll need to perhaps think of a privacy regulation businesses, employers, and governments must follow to protect the general population. Fahrenheit 451, 1984, and Animal Farm were once cautionary tales of a far-off future. But Big Brother is already watching and has been for quite some time. Police monitor YouTube videos. Mayors cite tweets to justify their actions. And we, thumb through our phones tagging friends and family without discretion.  Like every new technological advancement there are advantages and disadvantages. As Computer Vision becomes increasingly prevalent, we’ll all need to be aware of the kind of data we supply from to text to image. We can’t go back to the way things were, but we can learn about ourselves through the computer’s lens. And when it comes to computers and their capabilities, don’t judge a book its cover. If you’re interested in Data & Analytics, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants for more information. 

A Q&A With Dyson’s Data Governance CDO

A Q&A With Dyson’s Data Governance CDO

Mridul Mathur is a skilled Senior Program Director with more than 15 years of experience working in businesses from Deutschebak to Dyson. He has a proven track record of successfully delivering large and complex cross-functional programs and building high performing teams from scratch. In last five years the main focus of his work has been in the area of Data Management to address the issues and challenges organisations have faced in the wake of various new regulations. Data Management and Data Governance are hot topics at the moment. Do you feel that attitudes have changed towards the fields since the beginning of your career? It’s been a very big shift. Going back to my involvement at Deutsche Bank around 2007, we were managing Data purely because we needed to create a Credit Risk position so that we could explain to the Bank of England and other regulators what we were doing. We didn’t really look beyond that.  But now, if you look at the industry, we want to use Data to not only calculate our Risk position but to derive value out of that Data.  It's something that can give a company a competitive advantage  one of those things that can significantly change a business. I personally feel that the turning point, not just for Deutsche Bank but for everybody was the market crash that happened in 2008.  A lot of the company did not have Data Management skills, or the ability to bring the Data together to understand exposures. Those who had exposure against Lehman, for example, could not recover any of the money they lost. That was the big turning point for all of them, when they actually lost hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of revenue and loans overnight. They didn’t have the right Data, in the right place, and it cost them. What major issues do you see successful Data Governance facing over the next 12 months? I think we're still going through a phase of understanding and internalizing the issue. By that I mean that we understand that our Data is important and how it can help us not only manage Risk but create value. But, when it comes to actually applying it, we are hamstrung by two things:  One is that we haven't quite grasped the ways in which we can internalise that Data. We understand the value but the actual application is not really out there currently. Secondly, I think that in some places, we have too much activity. I've been in places where there have been competing Data agendas and competing Data Governance ideas. When people are not taking their organisational view and just looking to get ahead, it’s hard to achieve any real success.  If you were advising a company about to commence on a large Data Management transformation project, what advice would you give them? This links to the previous point really, and it’s a bigger issue in large companies. You need to have a business approach to Data Governance, as well as the IP capabilities to deal with a project of that scale. And what you find sometimes is that multiple groups get together and they each have a different view of what good looks like. They end up not communicating throughout the organisation and properly aligning everybody’s roles and responsibilities. These different agendas then end up causing issues because everyone has a different idea of what they want.  We need to be able to plan across the organization to get the right agenda and get the right properties in place. Then you can start the work, as opposed to each team just working where they think the biggest problem lies first.  What would you say are the biggest threats to a successful Data Management program? Obviously the above is one, but it leads to another which is really the lack of Senior Management sponsorship. If you don’t get the right level of sponsorship, then you don’t get the mandate to do what you need. This can cause huge delays and is definitely one of the biggest threats to your program being a success.  In finance, you worked within a highly regulated industry. How have your approaches changed now that you’re in a highly innovative, tech-driven environment? The approach is different. We do have challenges that others don't, but over and above, because we innovate and create things, there is an abundance of new information. Information protection and intellectual property protection is therefore at the top of the agenda. That drives the need for effective Data Governance and it really has to be at the forefront of the approach.  Data breaches have caused widespread reputational damage to companies such as Facebook and Yahoo. Have you found that companies now view Data protection as central to their commercial performance? Absolutely. People realize that they not only need Data to do their business, but they also need to protect that Data. These breaches have resulted in a greater importance being given to this function and every year I see it moving closer to the center of the organisation. There are very few large organisations left that haven’t recognized Data Protection as one of their formal functions. A lot of companies are now looking to build out their Data Protection teams from the ground up, starting with lower levels of analysts, but also management as well. It’s becoming a much greater priority and these big breaches are one of the driving factors.  What do you feel will be the most effective technical advancement within Data Management in 2019? I think, from a technological perspective, we still have some way to go with digital rights management. There’s now one or two solutions that are supposed to be at Enterprise level, but they’re not enough and they’re still not joining the digital rights management side of things with the Big Data Loss Prevention side.  So companies are having to rely on seeing this together with a combination of plugin software and various tools and technology. It’s sticking around the edges of the edges of a fix, but it’s not actually doing the job. I'd like to see these technologies develop because I think we're crying for some help in this area.  What is the biggest risk to their Data that businesses should be aware of? Not knowing where to get hold of Data. It is just mind boggling to me, that there has not been a single company that I have been a part of where we started a program and we knew where to get all our Data from. Obviously we knew where most of it was,  but we didn’t know where else it was and that what we were looking at was a comprehensive set of maps. It just continues to be the same at every business I have worked at.   What role does data governance have to play in protecting a business’ intellectual property? It plays a huge role. Firstly, a company needs to be very clear on their Data policies. This means regularly training teams on the importance of this, much like you would with health and safety. By clearly defining and educating people on the dos and don’ts of data handling you can better protect your intellectual property. I think getting the policy framework right and implementing it using digital rights management is crucial and good Data Governance relies on this.  When hiring for your teams, which traits or skills do you look for in candidates? There are two key parts; one is technical and the other non-technical. In my mind, it’s less about the technical because, ultimately, I just want someone who knows how to use ‘technology x’. They need to be able to make use of Data from a database, or be able to spot Data in an unstructured environment. But, for me, the most important skill is more of a characteristic: tenacity. I use the word tenacity because you have to put yourself out there. You have to ask people questions and you have to educate them. You can’t assume that people just understand Data you’re presenting them and you have to become their friends and learn to speak their language. It also really brings in the skill of being able to work with teams and across teams. Being a team player would absolutely be top of my list. Mridul spoke to Femi Akintoye, a Recruitment Consultant in our Data & Technology function. Take a look at our latest roles or get in touch with Femi.