STAFF BIOLOGICAL MACHINE LEARNING ENGINEER

San Francisco, California
US$260000 - US$300000 per annum + BENEFITS

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STAFF MACHINE LEARNING ENGINEER

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

$260,000 - $300,000 + BENEFITS

THE COMPANY

This biotech company is transforming the immuno-oncology. Private and well-funded, they are utilizing machine learning and the cloud to develop new therapies. As a staff machine learning engineer, you would be setting strategic direction and developing new algorithms for biological problems on NGS data sets.

THE ROLE

Responsibilities will include:

  • Developing machine learning algorithms for biological data
  • Productionizing and implementing on the cloud
  • Interfacing cross functionally with internal teams

YOUR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

Your skills include:

  • Degree in Computer Science, Applied Math, Computational Biology, Bioinformatics, or other related fields
  • Experience developing NGS, DNA-seq, RNA-seq based algorithms
  • Industry experience using machine learning packages and Python
  • Industry experience using AWS, Google Cloud, or Azure

THE BENEFITS

  • Base salary range of $260,000 - $300,000
  • Comprehensive healthcare, vision, and dental
  • Commuter benefits, catered lunches, work from home days and more!
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89565/AL
San Francisco, California
US$260000 - US$300000 per annum + BENEFITS
  1. Permanent
  2. Bioinformatics

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