Senior Research Scientist

Washington, District of Columbia
US$120000 - US$180000 per year + Bonus, Benefits

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Senior Autonomy / Robotics Engineers

Washington D.C.

$120,000 + Equity + Bonus

 

Harnham have been retained by an established defense and space business, specializing in autonomy, unmanned systems and robotics. Having been established for over 60 years and with over 30 multi-million dollar programs with DARPA, the DoD and Homeland Security, they are looking for senior software engineers with expertise in robotics, autonomy, unmanned systems or computer vision team to join an established group focused on multi-vehicle autonomy.

 

The Role

  • Building algorithms to allow up to 30 UAV's to communicate and operate in the field completely autonomously
  • Building algorithms for fully autonomous amphibious unmanned vehicles to work completely independent from human interaction
  • Writing proposals to expand and win new clients and projects
  • Liaising with clients directly, presenting on program progress
  • Reporting directly into the Principal Investigator

 

Experience Required

  • 4+ years in real world industry in working within autonomy, unmanned vehicles, robotics or computer vision
  • Heavy Software engineering experience with C++ and Python
  • Real world examples of applying, building and using machine learning or computer vision algorithms
  • Experience in path planning, SLAM, perception and other forms of robotics autonomy
  • PhD/Master's Degree - Computer Science or related
  • Must be US citizen and eligible for security clearance

The Company

  • Established business, staple of the Washington D.C.defense industry
  • Great relationships with DARPA and the government through years of building relationships
  • 80 employees in the business
  • Global leaders in defense
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JMCVDC
Washington, District of Columbia
US$120000 - US$180000 per year + Bonus, Benefits

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Where Tech Meets Tradition

Where Tech Meets Tradition

If you’re lamenting the decline of handmade traditional products, cast your cares aside. There’s a new Sheriff in town and its name is, Tech. Just a generation ago, children would leave the farm or the family business, go to school, and then move on to make their place in the world doing their own thing. Away from family.  Today, the landscape has changed and those who have left are coming home. But this time, they’re bringing technology with them to help make things more efficient and more productive. Is Tech-Assisted Still Handmade? In a word, yes. Artists still make things “from scratch”, except now technologies allow them to not only see their vision in real-time, but their customers, too. Have you ever wondered what the image in your head might look like on paper or in metal? What about the design of prosthetic arms and healthcare devices by 3D printers? You’re still designing, creating.  But just like any new technology, there’s still a learning curve. Even for cutting-edge craftspeople who find that sometimes, the line between craftsmanship and high-tech creativity may be a bit of a blur. Not to mention the expense for either the equipment required or being able to offer art using traditional tools at technology-assisted prices. Somewhere between the two, there is a trade-off. It’s up to the individual to determine where and what that trade-off is. Life in the Creative Economy One of Banksy’s paintings shredded itself upon purchase at an auction recently. AI is making music and writing books. Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Blockchain all have their place in the creative economy from immersive entertainment to efficient manufacturing processes. Each of these touches the way we live now. In a joint study between McKinsey and the World Economic Forum, 'Creative Disruption: The impact of emerging technologies on the creative economy', the organisations broke down the various technologies used in the creative economy and how they’re driving change. For example: AI is being used to distill user preferences when it comes to curating movies and music. The Associated Press has used AI to free up reporters’ time and the Washington Post has created a tool to help it generate up to 70 articles a month, many stories of which they wouldn’t have otherwise dedicated staff.Machine Learning has begun to create original content. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality have come together as a new medium to help move people to get up, get active, and go play whether it’s a stroll through a virtual art gallery or watching your children play at the playground.  Where else might immersive media play out? Content today could help tell humanitarian stories or offer work-place diversity training. But back to the artisan handicrafts.  Artistry with technology Whilst publishing firms may be looking to use AI to redefine the creative economy, they are not alone. Other artists utilising these technologies include:  SculptorsDigital artistsPaintersJewellery makersBourbon distillers America’s oldest distiller has gotten on the technology bandwagon and while there is no rushing good Bourbon, but you can manage the process more efficiently. They’ve even taken things a step further and have created an app for aficionados to follow along in the process. Talk about crafted and curated for individual tastes and transparency. It may seem almost self-explanatory to note how other artisans are using technology. But what about distilleries? What are they doing? They’re creating efficiency by: Adding IoT sensors for Data Analytics collection Adding RFID tags to their barrels Creating experimental ageing warehouses (AR, anyone?) to refine their craft. Don’t worry, though. These changes won’t affect the spirit itself. After all, according to Mr. Wheatley, Master Distiller, “There’s no way to cheat mother nature or father time.” Ultimately, the idea is to not only understand the history behind the process, but to make it more efficient and repeatable. A way to preserve the processes of the past while using the advances of the present with an eye to the future. If you’re interested in using Data & Analytics to drive creativity, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expect consultants to find out more. 

Machine Learning: How AI Learns

Machine Learning: How AI Learns

Amazon has begun curating summer reading lists. How? Patterns. Facebook shows you ads for items you may have been searching for online. How? It learns from your browsing habits. Ever wondered how Facebook knows you were just looking at that pair of shoes or that particular guitar. The Data you feed it, feeds its brain. In other words, this is how Artificial Intelligence learns. Machine Learning. Whilst it can be disconcerting to know that a machine understands our buying habits, that’s not the only thing it’s used for. It’s also a pivotal tool in such areas as Bionformatics, Biostatistics, Computational Biology, Robotics, and more.  What is Machine Learning? Ultimately, it’s a method of Data Analysis which helps to automate model building and is part of Artificial Intelligence. In other words, it helps to solve Computational Biology problems by learning from Data to identify patterns and make decisions with little human intervention. This helps scientific researchers learn about many aspects of biology. However, running a Machine Learning project can be difficult for beginners, who may experience issues when trying to navigate the information without making mistakes or second guessing themselves. This is one of the reasons a Computational Biologist might want to upskill with a course or two in Machine Learning for a more robust understanding of the information being learned and applied.  The Good News and the Bad With each shift of industrial revolution, there has been one system which has made an indelible mark on our daily lives and the Fourth Industrial Revolution is no different. Just like we can no longer imagine factories without assembly lines, we can also no longer imagine not having Siri, Google Maps, or online recommendations. But, as exciting and as important as these things are, Machine Learning has become so crucial to our daily lives, so complex, it takes a technology expert to master it leaving it nearly inaccessible to those who could benefit from it. Why is Machine Learning Important? By building models to peel back the layers and discover connections, organisations can more easily and more quickly make improved decisions with little to no human intervention. Computational processing is both more affordable and more powerful. It’s possible to quickly scale and produce models which can analyse bigger and more complex data and there’s also a chance to identify opportunities and to help avoid any unknowns such as risk. Machine Learning is used in every industry from Retail to Financial Services to Healthcare. Here are just a few ways it has already transformed our world. Retail – Retailers are able to learn from their customers buying habits, predictive buying habits, how to personalise a shopping experience, price optimisation, and customer insights.Financial services – Machine Learning helps to prevent fraud and identify Data insights.Healthcare – Wearable devices allow for real-time data to assess a patient’s health. Medical professionals can also more quickly find red flags which can help improve diagnoses and treatment.Oil and gas – It cannot only help find where oil might be, but also predict refinery sensory failure, and streamline distribution.Transportation – Help to make routes more efficient and predict problems that could affect the bottom line. While humans can create at least one or two models a week; Machine Learning can create thousands.  Ultimately, the goal of Machine Learning is to understand the structure of Data. As it learns to determine what Data is needed for its structure, it can be easily automated and sift through Data until a pattern is found. This is how machines learn. If you’re looking to take your next step in the field of Machine Learning, we may have a role for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities, or get in touch to see if we can help you take that next step.

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