PRINCIPAL COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGIST

San Francisco, California
US$150000 - US$175000 per annum + BENEFITS

PRINCIPAL COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGIST

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

$150,000-$175,000 + BENEFITS

THE COMPANY

This food startup is looking for a principal computational biologist to join their data team. This company is developing an innovative technique in food sustainability. Using your demonstrated experience in Python, R, and Bash, you would be driving scientific discussion and discovery and leading projects to change the way the world approaches food.

THE ROLE

Responsibilities will include:

  • Interfacing cross functionally with wet lab scientists, data engineers, and software engineers
  • Executing scientific projects in RNA seq, CRISPR and metabolomics
  • Driving computational biology innovation using demonstrated core techniques

YOUR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

Your skills include:

  • A PhD in bioinformatics, computational biology, biology, genomics, or related fields
  • Industry experience in Python, R and Bash
  • Demonstrated expertise in NGS, RNA seq, CRISPR, Cas9 or metabolomics
  • Experience using AWS
  • Algorithm development experience

THE BENEFITS

  • A salary range of $150,000- $175,000
  • Comprehensive medical, dental, and vision coverage
  • Subscription to - apps, personal development coaching, and more!

HOW TO APPLY

Please register your interest by sending your CV to Alyssa Liew via the Apply link on this page.

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Al/45985
San Francisco, California
US$150000 - US$175000 per annum + BENEFITS
  1. Permanent
  2. Bioinformatics

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Weekly News Digest: 10th - 14th May 2021

This is Harnham’s weekly news digest, the place to come for a quick breakdown of the week’s top news stories from the world of Data & Analytics.       Personnel Today: Mental Health Awareness Week: Concerns up 24% from last year It was Mental Health Awareness week this week, and this year, the focus was on the theme of nature. Personnel Today revealed some worrying statistics on the back of research from Close Brothers into the state of the population’s wellbeing in 2021.  Reports of mental ill-health has increased by nearly a quarter since this time last year as a direct consequence of the stresses and strains of COVID-19. From yo-yoing in and out of lockdowns to extended periods of isolation, job uncertainty and illness, this year has been like no other and it’s most certainly taken its toll.  63 per cent of 16–34-year-olds report mental health worries, up a seventh from last year.For those who are 55+, this worry has risen by a third. In this piece, it is made clear that the underlying issue lies not only with COVID-19, but the lack of support given by employers. The research revealed that 70 per cent of employers don’t have a wellbeing budget in place, and only 8 per cent of firms invest more than £126 per employee each year in health and wellbeing.  To read the full research, visit Personnel Today here.  Towards Data Science: 5 unique skills every Data Scientist should know We know that career tip articles for Data Scientists can all feel pretty ‘samey’. But this article in Towards Data Science mixes up the usual advice, looking at how those in, or aiming to be in, the industry need to brush-up on their softer skills if they are to be successful.  Tips include: Cutting down the jargon in order to communicate effectively with stakeholders. Don’t be hasty to overpromise, or you’re at risk of seriously under-delivering. Become friendly with your team’s software engineer, they’ll only be able to help you be more efficient and effective in your role.  Of course, there has to be some mention of coding in there – it wouldn’t be a data-based article without it. Make sure you’re mastering your SQL Optimisation. Don’t leave your Git out in the cold, become familiar with the practice to ensure you can update your model code quickly.  To read the full article, click here.  Analytics India Mag: What SMBs can learn from Big Tech’s AI playbook? AI has come on leaps and bounds in a short space of time, and its popularity has boomed. For the monster-sized companies, where budget is of no question and innovation can happen overnight if need be - embracing AI has been a total no-brainer. Workflows become more efficient, technology becomes smarter, and the scope of growth seems infinite.  However, despite all the benefits of AI that are so regularly shouted about, it’s been clear since the birth of the technology that there’s a huge divide in those who can and those who cannot afford to implement this innovation.  Up until now.  In this piece from Analytics India Mag, author Ritka Sagar, highlights how SMEs are finally finding ways to become ‘inventive’ with how they implement and use AI systems without breaking the bank.  To read how SMEs are managing this, click here. Silicon Republic: For smart cities to work, they need to be neutral and objective The concept of a smart city seems like something out of a futuristic, sci-fi film but, in fact, they are closer to becoming a reality than we may think.  The idea being that urban areas use sensors and other electronic methods to collect data. From citizens to traffic, water supply networks to crime detection, all of these assets of life, and more, are monitored, data collected, and insights given to make ‘life’ more efficient.  On the surface, it’s all very cool, but there are, of course, worries that come with it. In this Silicon Republic article, Computer Scientist, Larissa Suzuki, discusses the importance of ‘neutral and objective’ smart cities if they are to work.  She says; “Data and services in smart cities must be neutral and objective when reporting information about the city environment. They should encompass the entire population and respect data licences, regulation and privacy laws,” she said. “In a similar fashion, the digital services and the backbone technology – including algorithms – should be free from any ideology or influence in their conception, operation, integration and dissemination.” To read more on the future of smart cities, visit Silicon Republic here. We've loved seeing all the news from Data & Analytics in the past week, it’s a market full of exciting and dynamic opportunities. To learn more about our work in this space, get in touch with us at info@harnham.com.     

How Are Life Science Analytics Innovating For A Post-Pandemic World?

As COVID-19 unfolded, the Life Science discipline was thrust into the spotlight. The pandemic has shown the extent of the Life Sciences industry’s ability to innovate and collaborate. When facing a new disease, Life Sciences adapted quickly. The rate at which pharmaceutical companies successfully developed COVID-19 vaccines was unprecedented. Approaches that may have previously been labelled risky, were implemented to manage changing demand and deliver increased throughput. Embracing digitisation and innovation enabled organisations to adapt and accept constant change. The pandemic has shown just how well the Life Science industry is able to innovate and develop according to changing demands. As the world looks to the future, how can Life Sciences continue to remain dynamic?  Cloud data The cloud is becoming a CEO agenda item for Life Sciences. The cloud has the potential to enable more effective and profitable ways of doing business throughout the life science industry. It offers a powerful, secure platform for innovation and collaboration, with immense transactional power and data throughput. The cloud is necessary for creating data enablement, ensuring the right data is in the right place at the right time. It enables companies to innovate faster, work at a greater scale and increase collaboration.  Virtual communication According to Accenture, sixty-one per cent of healthcare professionals now communicate more with pharmaceutical sale reps than before the pandemic. 87 per cent now want either purely virtual or a blend of in-person and virtual meetings post-pandemic.  New means of virtual communication have created new opportunities in the industry. Digitisation allows for increased communication with trial participants and new opportunities to educate people about their conditions and care. There was already a growing trend for virtual healthcare interactions, but the pandemic has shifted this is into becoming the new normal. Collaboration ecosystem COVID-19 has led to increasing collaboration between companies. The race for a vaccine has seen cooperation evolve at an extraordinary pace. Companies who usually compete are now coming together to share data and cooperate. Organisations have created collaborative agreements in a matter of weeks; partnerships that pre-pandemic would have taken years to create.  The industry is now seeing the value of ecosystem partnership. The success of organisations post-pandemic relies on this continued collaboration.  AI and blockchain technology COVID-19 has increased the focus on AI in Life Sciences. Yet, Life Sciences have only scratched the surface of AI capabilities. AI has the potential to transform the industry; it can design novel compounds, identify genetic targets, expedite drug development and improve supply chains. The use of AI in Life Sciences is expected to continue to grow and organisations will need to focus ever more on merging human knowledge and AI capabilities.  Blockchain is also becoming increasingly trusted in Life Sciences. Its ability to create tamper-proof records makes it a key resource in increasing patient trust in remote clinical trials. As more of the industry understands the skills needed to use blockchain and increases collaboration, blockchain has the potential to become ubiquitous in Life Sciences. The pandemic has shown the importance of digital technology in Life Sciences. Digitisation increases efficiency and, collaboration, and also helps create a framework for future scientific discoveries. As we look towards a post-pandemic world, a successful Life Science industry must continue to embrace this mindset of innovation, collaboration and dynamism.  If you’re in the world of Data & Analytics and looking to take a step up or find the next member of your team, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.

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