Portfolio Analytics Manager

London
£50000 - £70000 per annum + Competitive Benefits

Portfolio Analytics Manager
Staines
Up to £65,000 + benefits + bonus

Lead a team and drive the growth of an exciting Mortgage portfolio through Analytics and Strategy development across the full customer life-cycle, with a focus on Acquisitions and growth of the book!

THE COMPANY

A fast growing brand with a distinctive start-up feel are seeking an experienced Credit Risk Analytics to grow a start-up Mortgage portfolio. If you're looking for a business that will offer you an opportunity to have a huge impact on the business and the bottom line, be a leader within the business and not be bound by a complex organisational structure - this role could be the role chance you've been waiting for!

THE ROLE:

  • Manager a small team of Credit Risk Analysts performing analysis, driving portfolio growth and developing Credit Risk strategies
  • Own Credit Risk Analytics along the full consumer life-cycle with a focus on Acquisitions and portfolio growth
  • Own analytics behind data driven retail lending portfolio (mortgages)
  • Analyse current strategies and work proactively to optimise strategies and portfolio performance
  • Work with stakeholders to improve model use and strategies
  • Be a leader within the business


SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

  • Experience designing, developing and implementing strategies in a Credit Risk environment
  • Experience maintaining, monitoring and optimising the performance of a Mortgage portfolio
  • Strong stakeholder engagement experience and communication skills
  • Strong SAS, SQL, Python or R skills
  • Highly numerate degree required


THE BENEFITS:

  • £65,000
  • Comprehensive benefits
  • Drive the strategic direction of a a major portfolio at a top lender

HOW TO APPLY:

Email your CV or use the apply feature on this page

KEY SKILLS:

Credit Risk Analysis, Portfolio Analysis, SAS, SQL, Retail Banking, Strategy, Commercial, Acquisitions Strategy, New Business Strategy, Loan Optimisation, Collections Strategy, Existing Customer Management, Portfolio Analytics, Product Strategy, Digital Optimisation, Marketing Analytics

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20059/cl
London
£50000 - £70000 per annum + Competitive Benefits
  1. Permanent
  2. Portfolio Analyst

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