Head of Analytics

Gibraltar
£120000 per annum

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Head of Analytics, Gibraltar
Gibraltar
£120,000 package

This is a chance to work for a new player in the igaming space. The organisation have recently set up new offices in Gibraltar and are looking for a Head of Analytics to take ownership of all analytics across their entire product portfolio.

THE COMPANY:

This business is a household brand back in the UK and has an award-winning online product portfolio. Due to growth they are investing millions into their advanced analytics capability.

THE ROLE:

- To work across the business to deliver insight on their Poker, Casino and Sports products.
- Build a dedicated team focusing on Web Analytics, Conversion and Data analytics
- Senior Stakeholder management
- Lead BI projects
- Provide thought leadership around new product development
- Deliver the global BI/Advanced analytics strategy

YOUR SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE:

- Extensive leadership experience
- Strong background in iGaming(Poker, Sports, Casino)
- Excellent technical background(advanced modeling, SQL)
- Strong communicator
- Ability to drive and influence a global analytics agenda.


THE BENEFITS:

- Marketing leading salary
- 300 days of sunshine
- Relocation fund
- Low tax rates

HOW TO APPLY:

Please register your interest by sending your CV via the Apply link on this page.

KEYWORDS:

crm/analytics/kpi/a/btesting/conversion/igaming/gibraltar/gaming/customer/marketing/reporting/data analysis/stakeholder/insight

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18160
Gibraltar
£120000 per annum
  1. Permanent
  2. Marketing & Insight

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National Storytelling Week: Telling A Story Through Data

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The Harnham 2019 Data & Analytics Salary Guide Is Here

We are thrilled to announce the launch of our 2019 UK, US and European Salary Guides. With over 3,000 respondents globally, this year’s guides are our largest and most insightful yet.  Looking at your responses, it is overwhelmingly clear that the Data & Analytics industry is continuing to thrive. This has led to an incredibly active market with 77% of respondents in the UK and Europe, and 72% in the US, willing to leave their role for the right opportunity.  Salary expectations remain high, although we’re seeing that candidates often expect 2-10% more than they actually achieve when moving between roles.  Globally, we’ve also seen a change in the reasons people give for leaving a position, with a lack of career progression overtaking an uncompetitive salary as the main reason for seeking a change.   There also remains plenty of room for industry improvement when looking at gender parity; the UK market is only 25% female and this falls to 23% in the US and 21% across the rest of Europe.  In addition to our findings, the guides also include insights into a variety of markets and recommendations for both those hiring, and those seeking a new role.  You can download your copies of the UK, US and European guides here.

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