Computer Vision Engineer

City of London, London
£45000 - £50000 per annum + Benefits

Computer Vision Engineer
London (Shoreditch)
£45,000-£50,000 + Equity

OVERVIEW

Harnham are currently working with a start-up who are working on complex problems in the Augmented Reality space related to computer vision.

The role will be to come in and use your machine learning/computer vision expertise to design algorithms which will allow the company to build mobile games.

There are exciting growth plans here, along with the opportunity to take ownership over the end-to-end production life cycle for Data Science.

There is a flexible and grown-up culture here with regular events and a sociable atmosphere.

THE ROLE

On a daily basis you will be:

  • Researching and developing machine learning algorithms for computer vision and image problems
  • Research into the use of deep learning techniques in computer vision
  • Working alongside the CTO, mobile game developers and designers.

SKILLS AND EXPERTISE

  • An MSc in Computer Science, Computer Vision, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning etc.
  • A strong knowledge of machine learning, applied to vision problems
  • A passion for researching new techniques and pushing the boundaries within machine learning/vision
  • The desire to take full ownership over a range of problems for the business

HOW TO APPLY

To be considered for this exciting opportunity, please submit your details using the Apply button on this page. Or for more information regarding other roles please contact Nick Mandella at Harnham.

KEYWORDS

Python, SQL, Tensorflow, Kaffe, Keras, Computer Vision, Deep Learning, Machine Learning, Data Scientist, Data Science, research, image recognition, video processing.

Send similar jobs by email
VANCM20
City of London, London
£45000 - £50000 per annum + Benefits
  1. Permanent
  2. Computer Vision

Similar Jobs

Salary

£70000 - £75000 per annum + bonus, flexible working

Location

City of London, London

Description

Do you have interested in robotics and would like to be at the forefront of the field?

Salary

US$140000 - US$180000 per annum + competitive bonus & benefits package

Location

Dallas, Texas

Description

An opportunity work with huge amounts of data, solve some really complex computer vision problems and have end-to-end ownership of projects!

Salary

£50000 - £51000 per annum + Yes

Location

City of London, London

Description

Data Scientist , London United Kingdom.

Salary

£45000 - £50000 per annum + Benefits

Location

City of London, London

Description

Brand new role in for a Computer Vision Engineer to join a tech start-up in the Augmented Reality space!

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

3 Ways Machine Learning Is Benefiting Your Healthcare

With Data-led roles leading the list in the World Economic Forum’s ‘Jobs of the Future’ report, it is no surprise that Data Science continues to be the main driving force behind a number of technological advancements. From the Natural Language Processing (NLP) that powers your Google Assistant, to Computer Vision identifying scanning pictures for specific objects and the Deep Learning techniques exploring the capability of computers to become “human”, innovation is everywhere.  It’s unsurprising, then, that the world of healthcare is fascinated by the possibilities Data Science can offer,  possibilities which could not only make your and my life better, but also save several thousands of lives around the world. To just scrape the surface, here are three examples of how Machine Learning (ML) techniques are being used to benefit our healthcare.  COMPUTER VISION FOR IMAGING DIAGNOSTICS  Have you ever had a broken leg or arm and saw a x-ray scan of your fracture? Can you remember how the doctor described the kind of fracture to you and explained where exactly you can see it in the picture? The same thing that your doctor did a few years ago, can now be done by an algorithm that will identify the type of fracture, and provide insights into how you should treat it. And it’s not just fractures; Google's AI DeepMind can spot breast cancer as well as your radiologist. By feeding a Machine Learning model the mammograms of 76,000 British women, Google’s engineers taught the system to spot breast cancer in a screen scan. The result? A system as accurate as any radiologist.  We‘ve already reached the point where Machine Learning and AI can no longer just outsmart us at a board game, but can benefit our everyday lives, including in as sensitive use-cases as the healthcare industry. NLP AS YOUR PERSONAL HEALTH ASSISTANT  When we go to our GP, we go to see someone with a medical education and clinical understanding who can evaluate our health problems. We go there because we trust in the education of this person and their ability to give us the best information possible. However, thanks to the rise of the internet, we’ve turned to search engines and WebMD to self-diagnose online, often reading blogs and forums that will convince us we have cancer instead of a common cold.  Fortunately, technology has advanced to the point where it can assist with an on-the-spot (much more accurate) evaluation of your medical condition. By conversing with an AI, like the one from Babylon Health, we can gain insights into possible health problem, define the next steps we need to take and know whether or not we need to see a doctor in person.  There’s no need to wait for opening times or to sit bored in a waiting room. Easy access from your phone democratises the process and advice can be received by anyone, at any time.    DEEP LEARNING DRAWS CONCLUSIONS BETWEEN MEDICAL STUDIES Despite their extensive qualifications, even medical researchers can feel overwhelmed by the sheer amount of Insights and Data that are gathered around the world in hospitals, labs, and across various studies. No wonder it’s not uncommon for important Insights and Data to get forgotten in the mix. Once again, Machine Learning can help us out. Instead of getting lost in a sea of medical data, ML algorithms can dig deep and find the information medical researchers really need. By efficiently sifting a through vast amounts of medical data, combining certain datasets and providing insights, ML sources ways for treatments to be improved, medicines to be altered, and, as a result, can save lives. And this is only the beginning. As Machine Learning continues to improve we can expect huge advances in the following years, from robotic surgery to automated hospitals and beyond. If you’re an expert in Machine Learning, we may have a job for you. Take a look at our latest opportunities of get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

How Big Data Is Impacting Logistics

How Big Data is Impacting Logistics

As Big Data can reveal patterns, trends and associations relating to human behaviour and interactions, it’s no surprise that Data & Analytics are changing the way that the supply chain sector operates today.  From informing and predicting buying trends to streamlining order processing and logistics, technological innovations are impacting the industry, boosting efficiency and improving supply chain management.  Analysing behavioural patterns Using pattern recognition systems, Artificial Intelligence is able to analyse Big Data. During this process, Artificial Intelligence defines and identifies external influences which may affect the process of operations (such as customer purchasing choices) using Machine Learning algorithms. From the Data collected, Artificial Intelligence is able to determine information or characteristics which can inform us of repetitive behaviour or predict statistically probable actions.  Consequently, organisation and planning can be undertaken with ease to improve the efficiency of the supply chain. For example, ordering a calculated amount of stock in preparation for a busy season can be made using much more accurate predictions - contributing to less over-stocking and potentially more profit. As a result, analysing behavioural patterns facilitates better management and administration, with a knock-on effect for improving processes.  Streamlining operations  Using image recognition technology, Artificial Intelligence enables quicker processes that are ideally suited for warehouses and stock control applications. Additionally, transcribing voice to text applications mean stock can be identified and processed quickly to reach its destination, reducing the human resource time required and minimising human error.  Artificial intelligence has also changed the way we use our inventory systems. Using natural language interaction, enterprises have the capability to generate reports on sales, meaning businesses can quickly identify stock concerns and replenish accordingly. Intelligence can even communicate these reports, so Data reliably reaches the next person in the supply chain, expanding capabilities for efficient operations to a level that humans physically cannot attain. It’s no surprise that when it comes to warehousing and packaging operations Artificial Intelligence can revolutionise the efficiency of current systems. With image recognition now capable of detecting which brands and logos are visible on cardboard boxes of all sizes, monitoring shelf space is now possible on a real-time basis. In turn, Artificial Intelligence is able to offer short term insights that would have previously been restricted to broad annual time frames for consumers and management alike.  Forecasting  Many companies manually undertake forecasting predictions using excel spreadsheets that are then subject to communication and data from other departments. Using this method, there’s ample room for human error as forecasting cannot be uniform across all regions in national or global companies. This can create impactful mistakes which have the potential to make predictions increasingly inaccurate.  Using intelligent stock management systems, Machine Learning algorithms can predict when stock replenishment will be required in warehouse environments. When combined with trend prediction technology, warehouses will effectively be capable enough to almost run themselves  negating the risk of human error and wasted time. Automating the forecasting process decreases cycle time, while providing early warning signals for unexpected issues, leaving businesses better prepared for most eventualities that may not have been spotted by the human eye.  Big Data is continuing to transform the world of logistics, and utilising it in the best way possible is essential to meeting customer demands and exercising agile supply chain management.  If you’re interested in utilising Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to help improve processes, Harnham may be able to help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more.  Author Bio: Alex Jones is a content creator for Kendon Packaging. Now one of Britain's leading packaging companies, Kendon Packaging has been supporting businesses nationwide since the 1930s.

Recently Viewed jobs