Digital Analytics jobs in France

What We Do

We help the best talent in the Digital Analytics market find rewarding careers.

We know Web Analytics, PPC, User Experience and Search Engine Optimisation of websites and online campaigns now command as much, if not more, focus than traditional marketing analysis techniques.

Today’s businesses know that innovation and technology are data-driven. With the right talent, they can see real time benefits of measuring and analysing their online activity. Our specialist knowledge of the French Data & Analytics market allows us to specialise in the support of this rapidly growing marketplace.

how We Do it

At Harnham, we strive to deliver an exceptional recruitment experience by taking the time to understand what drives our clients and candidates to excel.

We recruit at all levels across the full remit of digital analytics skills including Web Analytics, Conversation Rate Optimisation, UX design/architecture, Search Engine Marketing, Digital Analytics Strategy and Planning, and E-commerce. We understand the wide range of tools and specialist knowledge required to work within this continuously evolving industry.

Our team is always on the look-out for top talent and are continually developing our network of contacts throughout France and Europe. With our knowledge of analytical and behavioural targeting tools, from Google Analytics and Omniture to Adobe tools to Webtrends, no role in the Digital Analytics sector is beyond our reach.

What sets us apart?

Harnham works with a wide range of organisations, from SMEs to large corporations, digital analytics and media agencies and consultancies, specialist web metrics providers, and research companies. Whatever your skill set, we have an established network of Digital Analytics companies to help you find your perfect fit.

Before we pair people with our clients, we look at their respective mentalities. Our long-standing partnerships within the marketplace enable this. By going beyond CVs and company descriptions, we are able to only recommend professionals to companies they share a mindset with and achieve an optimal outcome for all involved.

Our teams are composed of local recruiters, speaking the native tongue for each country we recruit in. Our French team grows and entertains a local French network specific to the Digital Analytics market. If you are looking for that next career step in Digital Analytics, let us help you find it.

Latest Jobs

Salary

€50000 - €60000 per annum

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Opportunité de CHEF DE PROJET DIGITAL ANALYTICS au sein d'une agence 100% digitale.

Salary

€45000 - €50000 per annum

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Cette société leader dans le conseil stratégique digital recherche un Consultant Implémentation Senior.

Salary

€50000 - €60000 per annum

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Opportunité de Responsable Web Analytics au sein de la Digital Factory du leader du E-Commerce.

Salary

€45000 - €55000 per annum

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Dans le cadre d'une création d'équipe, cette société leader dans le conseil stratégique digital de ses clients recherche son consultant senior tracking.

Salary

€35000 - €40000 per annum + 10% prime sur objectif

Location

Paris, Île-de-France

Description

Nouvelle opportunité pour un WEB ANALYST junior de rejoindre le leader du transport.

Salary

€40000 - €45000 per annum

Location

Marseille, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur

Description

Nouvelle opportunité de Consultant SEA Senior à Marseille. Si tu maîtrises AdWords et Facebook Ads et que tu aimes le bord de mer, ce poste est fait pour toi !

Harnham blog & news

With over 10 years experience working solely in the Data & Analytics sector our consultants are able to offer detailed insights into the industry.

Visit our Blogs & News portal or check out our recent posts below.

The Next Generation Of French Web Analysts

The Next Generation Of French Web Analysts

The role and purpose of Web Analysts has evolved over the last few years, and now there are a number of different types of candidate profile across the French marketplace. Whilst, traditionally, Web Analysts focused on Data pulled from websites before using their findings to make business recommendations on how to improve the site and streamline user experience.  However, as, digital channels, including apps, social media and mobile devices have multiplied, the amount of Data available to gather insights from has increased dramatically. Web Analytics has become Digital Analytics as a result of the need to quantify and better understand customer behaviour regardless of the channel or device used.  Across the world’s leading technology hubs, the role of the Digital Analyst is no longer to just relay insights from a company’s website, but to analyse different Data sources, work with complex technologies and tell stories with their findings. We’re now seeing the same evolution take place across the French market.  Today's Web Analysts  Throughout the era of digital measurement and optimisation tools, the use of AB tests and MVT tests has allowed Web Analysts to trial different online solutions for their enterprises. Nevertheless, until recently, these have remained centred on only one channel; the website. Over recent years, however, new categories of Analytics have now emerged, all of which need to be viewed as equally important:  In-store Analytics: The measurement of physical store Data, a real-world equivalent of web analytics. Mobile Analytics: The analysis of users’ traffic and behaviour on mobile sites and applications. Social Analytics: The analysis of Data from social networks such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.  As a result of this diversification, businesses are now not only looking for technical Web Analysts who can work with Google Analytics or Adobe Analytics and implement tags with GTM or DTM. There is now an appetite to go further and deeper with their analysis and Web Analysts who can use tools such as Big Query/ SQL, R or Python are high in-demand. A candidate with ‘Data Web’ vision, a strong knowledge of Data and KPIs in different business models, stands out amongst ever-increasing competition.  Furthermore, as Web Analysts use a lot of Data, particularly personal Data, a strong knowledge of GDPR and the legal implications of their work are also incredibly beneficial.  In other words, Web Analysts are becoming more versatile. No longer siloed to their own space, Web Analysts should have experience of collaborating with marketing and technical teams, as well as to top management and senior stakeholders.  Tomorrow's Web Analytics With this progression of Analytics tools and skillsets, Digital Analysts are now playing a more important role in businesses than ever before.  As they continue to present new ways of interpreting and visualising Data, their impact on the bottom line is being felt more significantly than ever.   As a result, Web Analysts are now open to significantly more professional opportunities. Specifically, if they have a strong technical skillset and a business mindset, they can move into a Digital Business Analyst or Data Scientist position. This means that the best candidates are in incredibly high-demand and businesses need to be sure of what skillset they need before beginning a recruitment process.  For example, a company recently going through a big change in tools migration, such as moving from Adobe to GA, would be in need of a strong technical Web Analyst who can implement those tools. A business that is further down the line with their capabilities, on the other hand, may be looking for a candidate with a real business vision, in additional to an analytical skillset, who can make informed business recommendations. Whilst the French market may be in transition, we’re already seeing these changes take place in other regions. In the UK, there is a large amount of conversation around ‘Digital Intelligence’, and Web Analysts are now beginning to be viewed as important as Data Scientists within many leading organisations, partially because these roles are overlapping more and more. In fact, the lack of appreciation for Web Analysts in France is a point of contention for many candidates, something that was discussed frequently at this year’s MeasureCamp Paris.  Businesses who are looking to hire, and retain, Web Analysts need to be aware of this mindset. Candidates often share their apprehensions around the lack of training offered within their companies, as well as concerns about investment in their area. As Web Analysts continue to upskill, enterprises need to make sure they continue to offer growth, opportunity and a good working environment, particularly if they are seeking domestic talent.  Whether you are looking to expend your Web Analytics function or take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expect consultants to find out more. 

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Using Psychology To Enhance Your Web Analytics

Web Analytics have long been used to help companies understand their customers’ online behaviour, extracting and interrogating an abundance of information; from time spent on pages to bounce rates and conversion rates. Having provided a lot of insight as to what customer are doing online, these techniques have been less useful for understanding why they do it. This is where psychology comes in. As the why of Web Analytics becomes more and more important, with companies always looking ways to edge out the competition, there are more links to psychological principles than you might expect.  Of course, traditional Web Analytics and metrics remain very important. However, what psychology can do is help us speculate as to why customers may be behaving the way they do and, by doing so, allow businesses to make more informed changes to their websites, or conduct more conscious testing.  Without directly asking we will never know the real reason behind customer’s actions, but we can use a number of established psychological constructs to make well informed assumptions. We can then work this backwards and use these constructs to make changes to our sites that will fall in line with these assumptions in order to convert more customers.  Familiarity People tend to favour that which they are familiar with, whether it be items of clothing that match their preferred style or holidays like ones they have been on before. A customer visiting a page to find a series of unfamiliar products is more likely to leave without making a purchase. This is why personalisation is important; it gets rid of unnecessary information and leaves the user with products they are more likely to want.  By working backwards, businesses can personalise their sites to each individual customer. If you’ve ever bought an item of clothing from an online shop only to be shown a number of similar items the next time you log on, you’ll know what I’m talking about. The thinking is that, as these items are more familiar to you, you’ll be more likely to either purchase them, or remain on the site to purchase something else.  Social Proof  Research into social proof has shown psychologists that the more people who reinforce a certain concept, the more likely it is that other individuals will perceive it as correct. This heuristic is used widely by companies like Just Eat and Deliveroo who allow customers to leave comments about their restaurants and give them a star rating. It is much more likely that conversion rate will be higher on restaurants with better reviews as the rating allows the customer to make a quick judgments on its quality.  Scarcity This is a cognitive bias where humans put more value on things that are scarce over those that are in abundance. If one site is showing a product with no indication to the quantity left but another company is showing a similar product where there are only three left, the customer is more likely to convert on the second site. Where an item is nearly unavailable, this suggests a number of things; it is more valuable and it is desired by more people (social proof) etc. Companies like Amazon and Asos use this technique by showing visitors when an item is low in stock or even showing how few are left, giving them an edge on conversion over their competitors.   Web Analysts and CRO professionals should take note of user psychology and start to implement it in their day to day practice. In fact, some might be already without even knowing the fundamentals of the psychology behind these techniques. Applying the above techniques and testing these ideas could produce a boost in conversion that simple changes to user experience, like changing the position of the checkout basket, aren’t providing.  A number of businesses are now looking for Analysts who can explain why customers are behaving in a certain way and tell a story with the Data, rather than just explaining what was found. Finding someone with this deeper understanding of user psychology has therefore an integral part to many hiring processes. By looking into this area, candidates are likely to increase their chances of securing the role they want.  Whether you’re looking to expand your Web Analytics function or want to take the next step in your career, we can help. Take a look at our latest opportunities or get in touch with one of our expert consultants to find out more. 

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